14TB of secure portable spinning rust from iStorage

Subject: Storage | November 9, 2018 - 01:34 PM |
Tagged: iStorage, diskAshur, 12TB, external hdd

Not everyone needs the speed a portable SSD offers, however at $870 US the diskAshur DT2  is still a fairly large investment.  The cost is split between the Seagate IronWolf HDD and the case itself, which is fairly impressive.  The drive can be encrypted with AES-XTS 256 requiring a PIN be entered onto the numpad on the front, and supports multiple PINs so the drive can be shared with multiple users.  Inside the enclosure is a Common Criteria EAL4+ processor which offers protection against a wide variety of attacks if you happen to lose the drive and some unscrupulous person gets their hands on it.  Not only is it secure, it is the fastest external HDD Nikktech have tested.  

Drop by to take a look at a handy way to securely store a large amount of data.

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"Combining state of the art security measures with the highest available storage capacities the diskAshur DT2 Desktop Hard Drive by iStorage is the one stop to safeguarding all your sensitive data."

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Source: Nikktech

Western Digital Launches 15 TB Ultrastar DC HC620 SMR Hard Drive

Subject: Storage | November 7, 2018 - 06:44 PM |
Tagged: western digital, SMR, hgst, HelioSeal, datacenter

Western Digital is expanding its data center hard drive offerings with the reveal of a 15TB model based on fourth generation HelioSeal and second generation Host Managed SMR (Shingled Magnetic Recording) technology. The new 15 TB Ultrastar DC HC620 is aimed at data center customers doing surveillance, object storage for cloud services, streaming media storage, online backup and archival storage, and other sequential write focused tasks. The 7200 RPM hard drive comes in SATA (6Gbps) or SAS (12Gbps) flavors, but is not a direct drop-in replacement for just any drive as it works with host managed SMR to optimize how data is written to the drive which needs to be sequentially to get any amount of decent performance out of it. Random performance (writes in particular) isn’t great in other words, but it does offer up to 31% lower idle watts/TB than prior generation drives while delivering respectable (for mechanical drives) sequential performance and areal density with 900TB of storage being able to fit in a 40U (60-unit) rack or 40TB more compared to using 14TB drives
 
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Western Digital’s 15 TB DC HC620 (PDF)is a 7200 RPM hard drive with a 512 MB buffer. It is rated at 255 MB/s sustained transfer rates, 4.16 ms average latency, and 7.7ms read and 12ms write seek times. Further, the datacenter focused drives are rated for 550TB per year with a 2.5 million hour MTBF and a five year warranty.
 
While enthusiasts will not be using these new SMR drives, they may well be being used by the various cloud service providers and their services that end users take advantage of. It is interesting to see that shingled magnetic recording is still being developed and the increasing amount of data that is able to be crammed into the same 3.5-inch hard drive form factor. I am looking forward to future technologies like MAMR and HAMR as well to see just how far spinning rust can be pushed. While end users are enjoying the speed of solid state storage, hard drives are still alive and well in the data center thanks to TCO (total cost of ownership) and TB/watt/area metrics and the drive to optimize them being paramount. According to Western Digital, global data storage demands are going to approach 100 zetabytes within the next five years so I am curious how we will end up storing all of that and the kinds of technologies involved!
 
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: MyDigitalDiscount

MyDigitalDiscount doesn't seem to have been satisfied with their performance BPX line or their value SBX line, and have now launched a BPX Pro, which looks to carry the budget pricing of the SBX while offering performance *higher* than the original BPX. How much faster is the BPX Pro than the BPX? That's what this review sets to find out, so let's get to it.

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Specs:

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Internals:

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With the label peeled back, we find the Phison E12, coupled to Toshiba BiCS3 TLC NAND. PCBs are single sided up to 480GB. 960GB (and 2TB - not in this review) employ a different PCB with additional DRAM and two more flash packages on the flip side.

Read on for the results and conclusion!

Hyper Savage Exo USB SSD X! Kingston is a wee bit excited about their new external SSD

Subject: Storage | October 22, 2018 - 02:06 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyperx, HyperX Savage, Savage Exo, external ssd, M.2

The new USB 3.1 Gen2 external SSD from Kingston sports quite a name, which might help it sell with the console crowd as the drive will work on PlayStation 4s and Xbox Ones as well as PCs.  Those devices are limited to USB 3.0 but this drive will still be miles faster than the internal HDD.  Inside is Marvell's 88SS1074 controller and Kingston branded 64-layer Toshiba BiCS flash, however the implementation does not seem up to snuff when compared to other portable SSDs.  Check out the performance as well as The Tech Reports recommendations right here.

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"The latest gaming peripheral from HyperX is... a portable SSD? Parent company Kingston wants to woo the console crowd with a fast USB external drive. Read our review of the HyperX Savage Evo to see whether it delivers."

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1TB of Thunderbolt 3 connected flash for less than $500? Patriot's Evlvr

Subject: Storage | October 15, 2018 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: patriot, evlvr, thunderbolt 3, external ssd, 1TB, phison e8

Patriot's external SSD is available for about $200 less than Samsung's, though it's warranty is a year shorter at two and it doesn't feature hardware encryption acceleration.  On the other hand it also contains the brand new Phison E8 controller and 64-layer BiCS 3D TLC NAND which might make the drive more interesting than it appears at first glance.  The Tech Report put the drive through its paces, comparing it to Samsung's X5 as well as other USB drives; check out the results right here.

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"We were floored by the performance—and price tag—of Samsung's Portable SSD X5. Patriot's Evlvr 1 TB promises some of the same Thunderbolt 3 goodness without asking the buyer to take out a second mortgage. We ran Patriot's TB3 external through our test suite to see whether it captures lightning in a bottle."

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Hyper X RGB; if you can't make your flash faster you can make your fast flashier!

Subject: Storage | October 4, 2018 - 06:59 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyper x fury rgb, rgb ssd, 88SS1074

Team Group may have been first to offer an SDD to the terminal RGB addict but they are by no means the last.  Kingston are the next to display a flare of colour as they've added RGB to the HyperX Fury line of SSDs.  The Marvell 88SS1074 controller and Toshiba 3D TLC keep offer the performance that you would expect and keep the price trending towards $0.20/GB but there is still a premium to be paid to make yourself glow.  Pop by Benchmark Reviews for a closer look.

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"HyperX Fury RGB lights up that dark space in your case with customizable lighting effects, and is fully compatible with all modern RGB controllers. Utilizing the economical Marvell 88SS1074 storage controller with Toshiba 3D TLC NAND flash components, the Kingston HyperX Fury RGB SSD advertises 550 MB/s peak read speeds and 480 MB/s writes."

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Gigabyte Launches M.2 PCI-E NVMe x2 SSDs

Subject: Storage | September 27, 2018 - 12:41 AM |
Tagged: gigabyte, M.2, M.2 2280, NVMe, PCI-E 3.0

Gigabyte recently announced a new series of M.2 form factor PCI-E NVMe solid state drives. Following the company’s Ultra Durable technology and testing methodologies, the new Gigabyte M.2 SSDs come in three capacities at 128GB, 256GB, and 512GB in a M.2 2280 package.

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The new M.2 SSDs feature a PCI-E 3.0 x2 interface and support for NVMe 1.3 as well as Host Memory Buffer technology that allows for system RAM to be used as the drive’s cache in lieu of on-board DRAM. The 128GB and 256GB models are official today, and the 512GB model is reportedly coming soon. Gigabyte has not yet released specifications on the top capacity drive, but performance information on the two lower capacity drives is available on its website. The Gigabyte M.2 128GB SSD is rated at up to 1100 MB/s sequential reads, 500 MB/s sequential writes, 90K random read IOPS, and 100K random write IOPS. The mid-tier 256GB capacity SSD steps things up a bit to 1200 MB/s sequential reads, 800 MB/s sequential writes, 80K random read IOPS, and 150K random write IOPS. It seems to take a hit on the random reads, but the random write performance is much better, at least on paper. I am curious what the 512GB SSD will offer in terms of performance.

The new M.2 drives come with three-year warranties and 1.5 million hours MTBF ratings. The 128GB is limited (under warranty) to 100 TBW and the 256GB drive rated at 200 TBW. The drives will reportedly be available soon though I was not able to find online listings or pricing at the time of writing.

Source: Gigabyte
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Intel
Tagged: U.2, ssd, Optane, Intel, HHHL, AIC, 905P

Review

Intel just sent over a note that they have officially launched the 1.5TB capacity for the Optane SSD 905P (for both HHHL and U.2 form factors). We'd been expecting this for a while now, considering we had tested a full system incorporating the U.2 version of this very capacity two months ago. That system has now been given away, but I borrowed the SSD while Ken was tearing down the system for his review. With the product now officially launched, I thought it appropriate to take a quick look at this higher capacity part, both inside and out.

Outside

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Inside

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7 packages on one side of a single PCB. This is unexpected for a U.2 SSD since there is usually some sort of folded-over PCB sandwich, which doubles the available area for packages. Odd finding a single PCB here given the large 1.5TB capacity combined with XPoint dies only holding 16GB each.

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7 more packages along with the now standard XPoint controller. No DRAM necessary because, well, XPoint can easily pull double duty in that respect. Alright, so we have 1.5TB spread across only 14 packages. Throughout every Intel SSD we have ever laid our hands on for review, we've never seen *any* product (NAND or 3D XPoint) stack more than 4 dies per package. Had Intel stuck with that limit here, we would only have a maximum raw media capacity of 896GB. This is a 1.5TB SSD, so the only possible answer here is that we apparently have the first 8-die-per-package SSD to come out of Intel.

Read on for the test results!

ADATA's HD830 External HDD would be a lot of fun to test

Subject: Storage | September 17, 2018 - 04:51 PM |
Tagged: ruggedized, adata, HD830, 5TB

Able to withstand 3000kg of downwards pressure?

Check!

Able to survive being submerged completely in sand or water?

Check!

Able to live through a drop of 1.22m?

Check!

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Testing out ADATA's ruggedized 5TB HD830 sounds like a lot of fun.  Stick it under a hydraulic press and as long as it isn't set to over 3000kg spread over the body of the drive, though it would be educational to up the pressure a bit.

With an IP68 rating, or as the PR implies better than IP68, you can store your data under up to 2m of water for two hours or bury it in the dirt for even longer.  As long as that USB cover is closed your data will survive.  What if you wanted to bury it in the bottom of a 3m lake?  We will never know until we can test it.

As for drop-kicking the enclosure, as long as you keep it under 1.22m of height you should be good.  ADATA claims a MIL-STD-810G 516.6 rating, which means it went through a specific series of tests but they do not specify the results.  That shouldn't worry though, most devices now claim MIL-SPEC without considering how the militaries of the world judge contracts nor specifying the actual results.

Still, with this in our hands we could certainly find out ... eventually, or pick it up to use yourself.

Check out the full PR below the glamour shot.

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Taipei, Taiwan – September 13, 2018– ADATA today announces the launch of the HD830, its most rugged external hard disk drive (HDD) to date. It features an ultra-sturdy aluminum exterior, triple-layer construction, and IP68 rating for the ultimate protection of data. What’s more, the HD830 is MIL-STD-810G 516.6 compliant and can withstand up to 3000kg of downward pressure. The HDD is also equipped with shock sensors that prevent errors and bad sectors due to accidental impact and shaking.

Virtually Indestructible
The HD830’s tough aluminum exterior is not just capable of surviving nasty drops and blunt force, but can also handle 3000kg of downward pressure, roughly equivalent to the combined weight of fifty average-sized people. The HD830 also meets the U.S. Military’s MIL-STD-810G 516.6 standard and can survive falls from up to 1.22 meters. A three-layer construction provides complete protection inside and outside, including a tough outer silicone casing that comes in red or blue, shock-absorbing buffer, and cushioned mounting that firmly holds the drive in place.

Shock Sensor Protection
Lesser external drives continue to operate when dropped, potentially resulting in errors and bad sectors. The HD830 features shock sensors that stop drive activity when an impact is detected, such as when accidentally dropped. Users will know the sensors are activated when the LED indicator blinks in red. When the threat has passed the LED indicator will light up in blue and resume normal operation.

Stylishly Armored, Plenty of Storage Capacity The HD830’s robust aluminum exterior is crafted with a boldly grooved surface texture with a sandblasted finish and two sturdy side columns that give the HD830 the look of a true warrior. In an era of 4K Ultra HD videos and other high-resolution content, users can never have too much storage capacity. The HD830 has them covered with 2TB, 4TB and 5TB of storage capacity.
As with all ADATA external hard drives, the HD830 is backed by a 3-year warranty.

MSRP
ADATA HD830 External HDD

  • 2TB/$109.99
  • 4TB/$149.99
  • 5TB/$209.99

 

Source: ADATA

How does that 14TB BarraCuda Pro perform?

Subject: Storage | September 14, 2018 - 03:52 PM |
Tagged: Seagate, hdd, BarraCuda Pro, 14tb

Inside the Barracuda Pro are eight platters each 1.75 TB in size and comes with a nice addition to the warranty, if the drive dies before two years have expired you can ship the drive to Seagate and they will attempt to recover your data for free.  The Guru of 3D's testing showed the accuracy of the 250MB/sec rating, as expected from a modern SATA HDD. The total warranty is five years and the drive is rated for 24/7 use with a 300TB/yr rating so there are certainly plenty of usages for the drive.

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"It's here! We review the Megalodon among the HDDs, the Barracuda Pro 14TB from Seagate is unleashed today, that's a 14.000GB HDD folks! This, by far, is the biggest single consumer unit storage device to date. It might not offer SSD performance, but it certainly isn't slow. It's the year 2018, it's big but with these massive HDD platters, will it be fast enough?"

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Source: Guru of 3D