Drobo Launches 5C - 5-bay USB 3.0 Type-C (Type-A) Direct Attached Storage Solution

Subject: Storage | October 4, 2016 - 12:30 PM |
Tagged: usb 3.0, Type-C, Type-A, hdd, External, Drobo 5C, drobo, DAS, 5-bay

We looked at the third-gen 4-bay Drobo over a year back, and while the performance and price were great, it was held back by its limited number of drive bays. Drobo fixed that today:

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The new Drobo 5C is basically an evolution of the 4-bay model. Performance is similar, which justifies the choice to stick with USB 3.0 (5 Gbit), but we now have a Type-C port on the Drobo side (a Type-C to Type-A cable is included to cover most potential users). The added bay helps users increase potential capacity or alternatively select BeyondRAID's Dual Drive Redundancy mode without as much of an ultimate capacity hit compared to its 4-bay predecessor.

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The Drobo 5C supersedes the old 4-bay unit in their lineup.

The new Drobo 5C is available today for $349, with drive package deals offered direct from Drobo. Drobo is also offering a limited-time $50 discount to 2nd and 3rd gen 4-bay Drobo owners (valid until 11 Oct 2016). I have confirmed here that a disk pack from a 4-bay model can be moved directly to the new 5-bay model with no issue.

We have a full review of the Drobo 5C coming, but we have a few questions out to them that need answering before our article goes live.

Full press blast after the break.

Source: Drobo

Business on the front and back end, Kingston's SSDNow KC400 series

Subject: Storage | October 3, 2016 - 09:03 PM |
Tagged: kingston, ssdnow KC400, Phison PS3110-S10, mlc, sata ssd

Kitguru has another Phison PS3110-S10 based SSD up for review, the Kingston SSDNow KC400 512GB SATA SSD.  This drive is heavily packaged compared to others, with sixteen 32GB 15nm MLC NAND packages and a 256MB DDR3L-1600 paired with the eight channel controller.  The drive is marketed at businesses and with an 800TB lifetime, 450GB of writes everyday for the five year warranty as well as SmartECC and SmartRefresh it would fit that bill.  Consumers and businesses alike will appreciate the sequential read/write performance of 550MB/s and 530MB/s.  Overall it is another drive that fits into the existing pack of drives and is worth your consideration, especially if you have need of its error correction features.  Read the full review for more information.

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"Kingston’s SSDNow KC400 family is part of the company’s business-oriented SSD product line which features end-to-end data path protection, technologies to protect data in the NAND and guard against read errors, as well as good endurance."

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Source: Kitguru

Toshiba Announces OCZ TL100 2.5" SATA SSDs - 240GB at $0.28/GB!

Subject: Storage | September 27, 2016 - 09:51 PM |
Tagged: toshiba, tlc, TL100, ssd, sata, ocz, 2.5

Toshiba launched the OCZ TL100 series today:

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These are TLC SSDs aimed at the budget sector. They are using the ever more common SLC cached TLC hybrid configuration, and come in at bargain basement pricing. Here are the specs:

  • Capacity: 120 / 240 GB
  • Sequential read / write: 550 / 530 MB/s
  • Random read / write: 85k / 80k IOPS
  • Warranty: 3 years with advance replacement
  • Endurance (120/240GB): 30 / 60 TBW (27 / 54 GB/day)
  • Price:
    • 120GB: $45 ($0.38/GB)
    • 240GB: $68 ($0.28/GB)

Yes, that's $0.28/GB and a 240GB SSD at less than $70 bucks. The endurance is on the low side, but if these perform even half way decently, they will be a great low-cost way to go for most budget PC builds. We'll be testing these shortly on a new suite of tests with workloads that have been specifically optimized to more closely resemble real usage. These tests allow hybrid SSDs to use their SLC cache as opposed to flooding the drives with IO and forcing TLC writes. Don't be surprised if these perform surprisingly well for their cost. No guarantees as we haven't tested them yet, but we will soon!

Press blast after the break.

Source: OCZ

The AS330 Panther 960GB SSD is branded Apacer but what matters is what is inside

Subject: Storage | September 26, 2016 - 05:42 PM |
Tagged: tlc, Phison PS3110-S10, AS330 Panther, apacer, 960GB SSD

Almost everyone seems to be making SATA SSDs these days, the market is much more crowded that at this time last year which can make your purchasing decisions more complicated.  If you cannot afford the new M.2 and PCIe SSDs but are instead looking for a SATA SSD then your choices are varied and you cannot necessarily depend on price when you make your decision.

The internals are what really determines the value you are getting from an SSD, in this case the AS330 uses the four channel Phison PS3110-S10 controller, 15nm Toshiba TLC NAND and has a 512MB DDR3L-1600 cache.  This puts it in the same class as many other value priced SSDs from companies like PNY and Kingston.  Hardware Canucks' testing proves this to be true, the drive is a bit slower than the OCZ Trion 150 but is solidly in the middle of the pack of comparable SSDs.  The price you can find the drive will be the deciding factor, the 960GB model should sell around $200, the 480GB model is currently $120 on Newegg.

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"Apacer's AS330 Panther SSD is inexpensive, offers good performance and has capacity to burn. But can this drive roar or will a lack of brand recognition cause it to purr out to obscurity? "

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*Updated* Samsung 960 PRO and 960 EVO Announced - Details and Specifications Inside

Subject: Storage | September 21, 2016 - 04:00 AM |
Tagged: ssd, Samsung, pcie, NVMe, M.2, 960 PRO, 960 EVO

I'm currently running around at the various briefings and events here at Samsung's Global SSD Summit, but we did get some details on the 960 PRO and EVO that I've set to go live at the NDA time of 1 PM Seoul time.

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Here is a distilled version of the specs, capacities, and prices of the 960 PRO and EVO:

960 PRO

  • 512GB, 1TB, 2TB capacities
  • Sequential: 3.5 GB/s reads / 2.1 GB/s writes
  • 4K random (IOPS): 440,000 read / 360,000 write
  • Dynamic Thermal Guard (new version of their overtemperature protection - details below)
  • 5 year warranty, endurace peaks at 1.2PBW for the 2TB model
  • 512GB model = $329.99 ($0.64/GB)

960 EVO

  • 250GB, 500GB, 1TB capacities
  • Sequential: 3.2 GB/s reads / 1.9 GB/s writes (write speed is for TurboWrite SLC cache)
  • 4K random (IOPS): 380,000 read / 360,000 write
  • Dynamic Thermal Guard
  • 3 year warranty, endurance up to 400TBW for the 1TB model
  • 250GB = $129.99 ($0.52/GB)

I would certainly like to see Samsung push the 960 EVO capacities upwards of 4TB, and with competing M.2 NVMe products shipping at a lower cost, those prices use some tweaking as well.

More information and pics to follow later today (tonight for you USA folks)!

**UPDATE** - since everyone is in bed and hasn't read any of this yet, I'm just going to add the information from the presentation here.

First, some of you may be wondering about the inverted capacity difference between the PRO and EVO. Historically, Samsung has shipped their EVO line in higher capacities than the PRO line. The 850 EVO currently ships in capacities up to 4TB, while the 850 PRO remains limited to 2TB. If you look closely at the photos above, you'll note that there are four flash packages on the PRO, while there are only two on the EVO. The cause for this difference is that the DRAM package (visible on the EVO) is integrated within the controller package on the PRO model. This is similar to what Samsung has done with their PM971-NVMe SSD, which has not only the controller and DRAM, but the flash itself all stacked within a *single* package. Samsung calls this package-on-package (PoP):

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During the Q&A, Samsung's Unsoo Kim indicated that future 960 EVO's may also shift to the PoP design in order to shift to 4 packages, and therefore double (or quadruple) the capacity on that line in the future.

Samsung also tackled thermal throttling head-on with what they call Dynamic Thermal Guard. This is a combination of a few things. First is the reduced power consumption - the new controller draws ~10% less power despite moving to a 5-core design (up from a 3-core on the 950 PRO). Second, and perhaps more interesting, is a new heat spreading label:

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This new label contains a copper layer that helps spread heat across more of the surface area of the M.2 part. Samsung gets bonus points for outside the box thinking there. The combination of the reduced power draw and the heat spreader help to make thermal throttling even more impossible under typical use:

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While the above chart was for reads (writes produce more heat), that's still a very good improvement, and being able to move potentially the full drive capacity before throttling is pretty good, especially considering the new models are moving data at a much faster speed. About those faster speeds, here are some increased details on the per-capacity specs:

960 PRO

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960 EVO

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Take the 960 EVO write specs with a grain of salt - those are assuming writes are going into the SLC cache area but never fear because TurboWrite is getting a boost as well:

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This new 'Intelligent TurboWrite' increases the SLC cache area significantly over that of the 850 EVO we are all used to, with up to a 42GB area on the 1TB model! This should make it easier to swallow those boastful write performance claims, as there's a really good chance that all writes any typical user applies to the new EVO will go straight into that new larger cache. 

Apologies for the odd cutoffs on these pictures. They were corrected for parallax prior to posting. I also couldn't do anything about the presenter being in the way of the data :). I've requested slides from Samsung and will replace these here if/when they are provided.

Last but not least was a newly announced '2.0' version of the Samsung proprietary NVMe driver, which should help enable these increased speeds, as the Windows InBox driver is certainly not optimized to handle them. With the driver comes a new ground-up redesign of Samsung's Magician software, which added support for file-specific secure erasure and a special 'Magic Vault' secure encrypted area of the SSD that can be invisible to the host OS when locked.

This appears to be the bulk of what is to be announced at the Summit, so for now, I leave you with the endurance ratings and (MSRP) pricing for all capacities / models:

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Full press blast after the break.

Samsung Kicks Off Global SSD Summit With 960 EVO and 960 PRO

Subject: Storage | September 20, 2016 - 10:01 AM |
Tagged: Samsung, 960 PRO, 960 EVO, NVMe, pcie, ssd, Summit, Global

Your humble Storage Editor is once again in Seoul, Korea. With these trips comes unique skylines:

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...the Seoul Tower:

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...and of course, SSD announcements! Samsung has a habit of slipping product pics into the yearly theme. This year they were a bit more blunt about it:

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Yup, looks like tomorrow we will see Samsung officially announce their successor to the 950 PRO. We'll be hearing all about the 960 PRO and the new 960 EVO tomorrow, exactly three months after we broke the early news of these new models.

There will, of course, be more details tomorrow once we attend the relevant product briefings. This will be late at night for those of you back in the states. No further details for now. I'm off to get some dinner and recover from that 14-hour flight!

OCZ's VX500, next generation MLC for those who want price and performance in the same drive

Subject: Storage | September 14, 2016 - 09:53 PM |
Tagged: VX500, ocz, toshiba, TC35, mlc, sata 6Gbs

We've seen a lot of high end SSDs lately so it is nice to be able to link to the new VX500 series from OCZ, or Toshiba to be more technically correct.  Running with MSRPs of ~$150 for the 512GB model and ~$340 for the 1TB model these drives will fit more comfortably into many budgets.  The 1TB model does come with a bit of a price increase thanks to the use of larger MLC NAND chips and the presence of a RAM cache, the 512GB model forgoes the cache altogether.  Hardware Canucks put the 512GB and 1TB models to the test and their speeds hit the top of the SATA charts; if you can't afford the newest SSD tech this is a drive worthy of your consideration.  They did not have the time to fully test the durability but the five year hassle free warranty and rated total disk writes show that the NAND is unlikely to die any time soon.

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"OCZ is diving back into the mainstream SSD market in a big way. Their new VX500 series combines an affordable price with excellent performance and some incredible NAND durability."

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Crucial's new MX300 SSD; new NAND means new sizes

Subject: Storage | September 6, 2016 - 06:29 PM |
Tagged: crucial, MX300, 1050GB, sata ssd, M.2, 88SS1074, tlc

The MX300 series utilizes Micron 384G-bit, 32 tier floating gate, 3D TLC NAND which means that the capacities are a little different than we are used to.  1050GB is an odd number, the 978GB available after formatting even more so, but in the end the actual number matters less than the performance.  The SSD Review tested this drive which uses a four channel Micron 88SS1074 controller and sports eight NAND packages with Micron LPDDR3 1333MHz DRAM for a cache.  They tested a single drive as well as setting up two in RAID 0, the single drive could hit 535MB/s read and 516MB/s write and RAID 0 did indeed come close to doubling that.  Drop by to see their full results.

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"Due to the new 384G-bit TLC 3D NAND, the MX300 line up is now offered in 275GB, 525GB, 750GB, 1050GB, and 2TB options. From this announcement, the 2TB option intrigued us the most, however, they are still unavailable, so we opted to get two 1050GB models for today's review."

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Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Intel

Introduction, Specifications, and Packaging

Introduction:

It's been quite some time since we saw a true client SSD come out of Intel. The last client product to use their legendary 10-channel controller was the SSD 320 (launched in 2011), and even that product had its foot in the enterprise door as it was rated for both client and enterprise usage. The products that followed began life as enterprise parts and were later reworked for consumer usage. The big examples here are the SATA-based SSD 730 (which began life as the SSD DC S3500/3700), and the PCI/NVMe-based SSD 750 (which was born from the SSD DC P3700). The enterprise hardware had little support for reduced power states, which led Intel to market the 730 as a desktop enthusiast part. The 750 had a great NVMe controller, but the 18-channel design and high idle power draw meant no chance for an M.2 form factor version of the same. With the recent addition of low-cost 3D NAND to their production lines, Intel has now made began another push into the consumer space. Their main client SSD of their new line is the 600p, which we will be taking a look at today:

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Read on for our full review of the Intel SSD 600p M.2 NVMe SSD!

Samsung's 256GB Samsung EVO Plus MicroSD card, for your 4K recording pleasure

Subject: Storage | August 29, 2016 - 08:37 PM |
Tagged: microSD, Samsung, evo plus, U3, UHS-I

A while back Al broke down the specifications of SD cards and what each class meant and the proper usage for them.  The top class is U3 and it offers transfer speeds high enough to support recording 4K video on your devices and that happens to be the rating on the new 256GB Samsung EVO Plus MicroSD.  Legion Hardware just tested this MicroSD card and it now holds the title of best performing SD card they have tested.  The performance does come at a premium, the MSRP of the card is $250 and even with a 10 year warranty this is still an expensive purchase.  If you need the ability to record 4K video immediately this is the fast solution available but if you are still in the planning stages, remember that there is a new standard, UFS, which is due to hit the market soon and impact pricing of older products.

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"Running out of storage on your smartphone, tablet or 4K video camera? Well the good news is SD cards have never been more affordable and crucially offered such huge storage capacities. In fact, Samsung recently announced the availability of a 256GB version of their popular EVO Plus MicroSD card series"

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