Gigabyte's Aorus GTX 1070, the GPU you don't unbox

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 28, 2017 - 03:32 PM |
Tagged: external gpu, gigabyte, aorus, gtx 1070, thunderbolt 3, nvidia, gaming box

Have a laptop with Thunderbolt 3 and a mobile GPU that just doesn't cut it anymore?  Gigabyte now offers an incredibly easy way to upgrade your laptop, with no screwdriver required!  The Aorus GTX 1070 Gaming Box contains an external desktop class GTX 1070 and separate PSU, giving you a dock with some serious gaming prowess.  The Tech Report's benchmarks compare this external GPU against the GTX 1060 installed in their Alienware gaming laptop and Alienware's own external GPU enclosure, on both the internal display and an external monitor.  The results are somewhat mixed and worth reading through fully, however if you are on an integrated GPU then this solution is an incredible upgrade.

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"Gigabyte's Aorus GTX 1070 Gaming Box offers us a look into a future where a big shot of graphics performance is just a single cable away for ultraportable notebook PCs. We plugged the Gaming Box into a test notebook and gave it a spin to see just how bright that future looks."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Author:
Manufacturer: ASUS

Specifications and Design

With all of the activity in both the GPU and CPU markets this year, it's hard to remember some of the launches in the first half of the year—including NVIDIA's GTX 1080 Ti. Maintaining the rank of fastest gaming GPU for the majority of the year, little has challenged NVIDIA's GP102-based offering, making it the defacto choice for high-end gamers.

Even though we've been giving a lot of attention to NVIDIA's new flagship TITAN V graphics card, the $3000 puts it out of the range of almost every gamer who doesn't have a day job involving deep learning.

IMG_5011.JPG

Today, we're taking a look back to the (slightly) more reasonable GP102 and the one of the most premiere offerings to feature it, the ASUS ROG Strix GTX 1080 Ti.

Hardware Specifications

While the actual specifications of the GP102 GPU onboard the ASUS Strix GTX 1080 Ti hasn't changed at all, let's take a moment to refresh ourselves on where it sits in regards to the rest of the market.

  RX Vega 64 Liquid RX Vega 56 GTX 1080 Ti GTX 1080 GTX 1070 Ti GTX 1070
GPU Cores 4096 3584 3584 2560 2432 1920
Base Clock 1406 MHz 1156 MHz 1480 MHz 1607 MHz 1607 MHz 1506 MHz
Boost Clock 1677 MHz 1471 MHz 1582 MHz 1733 MHz 1683 MHz 1683 MHz
Texture Units 256 256 224 160 152 120
ROP Units 64 64 88 64 64 64
Memory 8GB 8GB 11GB 8GB 8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 1890 MHz 1600 MHz 11000 MHz 10000 MHz 8000 MHz 8000 MHz
Memory Interface 2048-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2 352-bit G5X 256-bit G5X 256-bit 256-bit
Memory Bandwidth 484 GB/s 410 GB/s 484 GB/s 320 GB/s 256 GB/s 256 GB/s
TDP 345 watts 210 watts 250 watts 180 watts 180 watts 150 watts
Peak Compute 13.7 TFLOPS 10.5 TFLOPS 11.3 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 7.8 TFLOPS 5.7 TFLOPS
MSRP (current) $699 $399 $699 $499 $449 $399

If you'd like some additional details on the NVIDIA GTX 1080 Ti, or it's GP102 GPU, take a look at our review of the reference Founder's edition.

The GTX 1000 series of products from NVIDIA has marked a consolidation in ASUS's GPU offerings. Instead of having both Strix and Matrix products available, the Strix has supplanted everything to be the most premium option from ASUS for any given GPU, and the Strix GTX 1080 Ti doesn't disappoint.

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While it might not be the largest graphics card we've ever seen, the ASUS Strix GTX 1080 Ti is more massive in all dimensions compared to both the NVIDIA Founder's Edition card, as well as the EVGA ICX option we took a look at earlier this year. Compared to the Founder's Edition, the Strix GTX 1080 Ti is 1.23-in longer, 0.9-in taller, and takes up an extra PCIe slot in width.

Continue reading our review of the ASUS ROG Strix GTX 1080 Ti!!

How deep is your learning?

Recently, we've had some hands-on time with NVIDIA's new TITAN V graphics card. Equipped with the GV100 GPU, the TITAN V has shown us some impressive results in both gaming and GPGPU compute workloads.

However, one of the most interesting areas that NVIDIA has been touting for GV100 has been deep learning. With a 1.33x increase in single-precision FP32 compute over the Titan Xp, and the addition of specialized Tensor Cores for deep learning, the TITAN V is well positioned for deep learning workflows.

In mathematics, a tensor is a multi-dimensional array of numerical values with respect to a given basis. While we won't go deep into the math behind it, Tensors are a crucial data structure for deep learning applications.

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NVIDIA's Tensor Cores aim to accelerate Tensor-based math by utilizing half-precision FP16 math in order to process both dimensions of a Tensor at the same time. The GV100 GPU contains 640 of these Tensor Cores to accelerate FP16 neural network training.

It's worth noting that these are not the first Tensor operation-specific hardware, with others such as Google developing hardware for these specific functions.

Test Setup

  PC Perspective Deep Learning Testbed
Processor AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920X
Motherboard GIGABYTE X399 AORUS Gaming 7
Memory 64GB Corsair Vengeance RGB DDR4-3000 
Storage Samsung SSD 960 Pro 2TB
Power Supply Corsair AX1500i 1500 watt
OS Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS
Drivers AMD: AMD GPU Pro 17.50
NVIDIA: 387.34

For our NVIDIA testing, we used the NVIDIA GPU Cloud 17.12 Docker containers for both TensorFlow and Caffe2 inside of our Ubuntu 16.04.3 host operating system.

AMD testing was done using the hiptensorflow port from the AMD ROCm GitHub repositories.

For all tests, we are using the ImageNet Large Scale Visual Recognition Challenge 2012 (ILSVRC2012) data set.

Continue reading our look at deep learning performance with the NVIDIA Titan V!!

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Looking Towards the Professionals

This is a multi-part story for the NVIDIA Titan V:

Earlier this week we dove into the new NVIDIA Titan V graphics card and looked at its performacne from a gaming perspective. Our conclusions were more or less what we expected - the card was on average ~20% faster than the Titan Xp and about ~80% faster than the GeForce GTX 1080. But with that $3000 price tag, the Titan V isn't going to win any enthusiasts over.

What the Titan V is meant for in reality is the compute space. Developers, coders, engineers, and professionals that use GPU hardware for research, for profit, or for both. In that case, $2999 for the Titan V is simply an investment that needs to show value in select workloads. And though $3000 is still a lot of money, keep in mind that the NVIDIA Quadro GP100, the most recent part with full-performance double precision compute from the Pascal chip, is still selling for well over $6000 today. 

IMG_5009.JPG

The Volta GV100 GPU offers 1:2 double precision performance, equating to 2560 FP64 cores. That is a HUGE leap over the GP102 GPU used on the Titan Xp that uses a 1:32 ratio, giving us just 120 FP64 cores equivalent.

  Titan V Titan Xp GTX 1080 Ti GTX 1080 GTX 1070 Ti GTX 1070 RX Vega 64 Liquid Vega Frontier Edition
GPU Cores 5120 3840 3584 2560 2432 1920 4096 4096
FP64 Cores 2560 120 112 80 76 60 256 256
Base Clock 1200 MHz 1480 MHz 1480 MHz 1607 MHz 1607 MHz 1506 MHz 1406 MHz 1382 MHz
Boost Clock 1455 MHz 1582 MHz 1582 MHz 1733 MHz 1683 MHz 1683 MHz 1677 MHz 1600 MHz
Texture Units 320 240 224 160 152 120 256 256
ROP Units 96 96 88 64 64 64 64 64
Memory 12GB 12GB 11GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 16GB
Memory Clock 1700 MHz MHz 11400 MHz 11000 MHz 10000 MHz 8000 MHz 8000 MHz 1890 MHz 1890 MHz
Memory Interface 3072-bit
HBM2
384-bit G5X 352-bit G5X 256-bit G5X 256-bit 256-bit 2048-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2
Memory Bandwidth 653 GB/s 547 GB/s 484 GB/s 320 GB/s 256 GB/s 256 GB/s 484 GB/s 484 GB/s
TDP 250 watts 250 watts 250 watts 180 watts 180 watts 150 watts 345 watts 300 watts
Peak Compute 12.2 (base) TFLOPS
14.9 (boost) TFLOPS
12.1 TFLOPS 11.3 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 7.8 TFLOPS 5.7 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS 13.1 TFLOPS
Peak DP Compute 6.1 (base) TFLOPS
7.45 (boost) TFLOPS
0.37 TFLOPS 0.35 TFLOPS 0.25 TFLOPS 0.24 TFLOPS 0.17 TFLOPS 0.85 TFLOPS 0.81 TFLOPS
MSRP (current) $2999 $1299 $699 $499 $449 $399 $699 $999

The current AMD Radeon RX Vega 64, and the Vega Frontier Edition, all ship with a 1:16 FP64 ratio, giving us the equivalent of 256 DP cores per card.

Test Setup and Benchmarks

Our testing setup remains the same from our gaming tests, but obviously the software stack is quite different. 

  PC Perspective GPU Testbed
Processor Intel Core i7-5960X Haswell-E
Motherboard ASUS Rampage V Extreme X99
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB DDR4-3200
Storage OCZ Agility 4 256GB (OS)
Adata SP610 500GB (games)
Power Supply Corsair AX1500i 1500 watt
OS Windows 10 x64
Drivers AMD: 17.10.2
NVIDIA: 388.59

Applications in use include:

  • Luxmark 
  • Cinebench R15
  • VRay
  • Sisoft Sandra GPU Compute
  • SPECviewperf 12.1
  • FAHBench

Let's not drag this along - I know you are hungry for results! (Thanks to Ken for running most of these tests for us!!)

Continue reading part 2 of our Titan V review on compute performance!!

SAPPHIRE Releases NITRO+ Radeon RX Vega (64 & 56)

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 15, 2017 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: vega 64 liquid, vega 64, vega 56, Vega, sapphire, radeon, amd

SAPPHIRE has just launched a pair of custom cooled, factory overclocked, RX Vega-based graphics cards. As you might guess: the SAPPHIRE NITRO+ Radeon RX Vega 64 uses the Vega 64 chip with its 4096 stream processors, while the SAPPHIRE NITRO+ Radeon RX Vega 56 uses the Vega 56 chip and its 3584 stream processors. Both cards have 8GB of HBM2 memory (two stacks of 4GB). The cooler design uses three fans and vapor chambers, with separate heat pipes for the GPU+Memory (six pipes) and VRMs (two pipes).

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It also has a back plate!

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The clock rate is where it gets interesting. The NITRO+ RX Vega 64 will have a boost clock of 1611 MHz out-of-the-box. This is above the RX Vega 64 Air’s boost clock (1546 MHz) but below the RX Vega 64 Liquid’s boost clock (1677 MHz). The liquid-cooled Radeon RX Vega 64 still has the highest clocks, but this product sits almost exactly half-way between it (the liquid-cooled RX Vega 64) and the air-cooled RX Vega 64.

The NITRO+ Radeon RX Vega 56, with its 1572 MHz boost clock, is well above the stock RX Vega 56’s 1471 MHz boost clock, though. It’s a clear win.

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As for enthusiast features, this card has quite a few ways to keep it cool. First, it will operate fanless until 56C. Second, the card accepts a 4-pin fan connector, which allows it to adjust the speed of two case fans based on the temperature readings from the card. I am a bit curious whether it’s better to let the GPU control the fans, or whether having them all attached to the same place allows them to work together more effectively. Either way, if you ran out of fan headers, then I’m guessing that this feature will be good for you anyway.

The SAPPHIRE NITRO+ Radeon RX Vega 64 and 56 are available now.

Source: SAPPHIRE
Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

A preview of potential Volta gaming hardware

This is a multi-part story for the NVIDIA Titan V:

As a surprise to most of us in the media community, NVIDIA launched a new graphics card to the world, the TITAN V. No longer sporting the GeForce brand, NVIDIA has returned the Titan line of cards to where it began – clearly targeted at the world of developers and general purpose compute. And if that branding switch isn’t enough to drive that home, I’m guessing the $2999 price tag will be.

Today’s article is going to look at the TITAN V from the angle that is likely most interesting to the majority of our readers, that also happens to be the angle that NVIDIA is least interested in us discussing. Though targeted at machine learning and the like, there is little doubt in my mind that some crazy people will want to take on the $3000 price to see what kind of gaming power this card can provide. After all, this marks the first time that a Volta-based GPU from NVIDIA has shipped in a place a consumer can get their hands on it, and the first time it has shipped with display outputs. (That’s kind of important to build a PC around it…)

IMG_4999.JPG

From a scientific standpoint, we wanted to look at the Titan V for the same reasons we tested the AMD Vega Frontier Edition cards upon their launch: using it to estimate how future consumer-class cards will perform in gaming. And, just as we had to do then, we purchased this Titan V from NVIDIA.com with our own money. (If anyone wants to buy this from me to recoup the costs, please let me know! Ha!)

  Titan V Titan Xp GTX 1080 Ti GTX 1080 GTX 1070 Ti GTX 1070 RX Vega 64 Liquid Vega Frontier Edition
GPU Cores 5120 3840 3584 2560 2432 1920 4096 4096
Base Clock 1200 MHz 1480 MHz 1480 MHz 1607 MHz 1607 MHz 1506 MHz 1406 MHz 1382 MHz
Boost Clock 1455 MHz 1582 MHz 1582 MHz 1733 MHz 1683 MHz 1683 MHz 1677 MHz 1600 MHz
Texture Units 320 240 224 160 152 120 256 256
ROP Units 96 96 88 64 64 64 64 64
Memory 12GB 12GB 11GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 16GB
Memory Clock 1700 MHz MHz 11400 MHz 11000 MHz 10000 MHz 8000 MHz 8000 MHz 1890 MHz 1890 MHz
Memory Interface 3072-bit
HBM2
384-bit G5X 352-bit G5X 256-bit G5X 256-bit 256-bit 2048-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2
Memory Bandwidth 653 GB/s 547 GB/s 484 GB/s 320 GB/s 256 GB/s 256 GB/s 484 GB/s 484 GB/s
TDP 250 watts 250 watts 250 watts 180 watts 180 watts 150 watts 345 watts 300 watts
Peak Compute 12.2 (base) TFLOPS
14.9 (boost) TFLOPS
12.1 TFLOPS 11.3 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 7.8 TFLOPS 5.7 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS 13.1 TFLOPS
MSRP (current) $2999 $1299 $699 $499   $399 $699 $999

The Titan V is based on the GV100 GPU though with some tweaks that lower performance and capability slightly when compared to the Tesla-branded equivalent hardware. Though our add-in card iteration has the full 5120 CUDA cores enabled, the HBM2 memory bus is reduced from 4096-bit to 3072-bit and it has one of the four stacks on the package disabled. This also drops the memory capacity from 16GB to 12GB, and memory bandwidth to 652.8 GB/s.

Continue reading our gaming review of the NVIDIA Titan V!!

Ti-ny bubbles in my card, watercooling the GTX 1080 Ti

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 13, 2017 - 02:05 PM |
Tagged: gtx 1080 ti, phanteks, G1080, watercooling

Phanteks announced their G1080 water block for GTX 1080 Ti's a while back but we hadn't seen it in action until now.  [H]ard|OCP installed the cooler on a Founders Edition card and created a video of the process.  Not only do they show how to properly install the water block they also cover a few of the possible issues you might encounter while doing so.  They also made a video showing how the coolant flows through the waterblock which is not only pretty but can help you determine where to insert your GPU into your watercooling loop.

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"Phanteks recently sent us its Glacier series water block for our Founders Edition GTX 1080 Ti. We take you through the full process of getting it installed. We check out the mating surfaces of the GPU, capacitors, and MOSFETs and show you just how well it all fits together. Then finally we show exactly how the coolant flows in 4K!"

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Video: What does a $3000 GPU look like? NVIDIA TITAN V Unboxing and Teardown!

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 12, 2017 - 07:51 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, titan, titan v, Volta, video, teardown, unboxing

NVIDIA launched the new Titan V graphics card last week, a $2999 part targeted not at gamers (thankfully) but instead at developers of machine learning applications. Based on the GV100 GPU and 12GB of HBM2 memory, the Titan V is an incredibly powerful graphics card. We have every intention of looking at the gaming performance of this card as a "preview" of potential consumer Volta cards that may come out next year. (This is identical to our stance of testing the Vega Frontier Edition cards.)

But for now, enjoy this unboxing and teardown video that takes apart the card to get a good glimpse of that GV100 GPU.

A couple of quick interesting notes:

  • This implementation has 25% of the memory and ROPs disabled, giving us 12GB of HBM2, a 3072-bit bus, and 96 ROPs.
  • Clock speeds in our testing look to be much higher than the base AND boost ratings.
  • So far, even though the price takes this out of the gaming segment completely, we are impressed with some of the gaming results we have found.
  • The cooler might LOOK the same, but it definitely is heavier than the cooler and build for the Titan Xp.
  • Champagne. It's champagne colored.
  • Double precision performance is insanely good, spanking the Titan Xp and Vega so far in many tests.
  • More soon!

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Source: NVIDIA
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

The flower, not the hormone

It was way back in December of 2014 that AMD and the Radeon group first started down the path of major driver updates on an annual cadence. The Catalyst Omega release marked the beginning of a recommitment to the needs of gamers (and now professionals) with more frequent, and more dramatic, software updates and improvements. Cognizant of the previous reputation the company had with drivers and software, often a distant second to the success that NVIDIA had created with it GeForce drivers, Radeon users were promised continuous increases.

And make no mistake, the team at AMD had an uphill battle. But with releases like Omega, Crimson, ReLive, and now Adrenalin, it’s clear that the leadership has received the message and put emphasis on the portion of its product that can have the most significant impact on experience.

AMD joins us at the PCPer offices to talk through all the new features and capabilities!

Named after the adrenalin rose, rather than the drug that flows through your body when being chased by feral cats, this latest major software release for Radeon users includes a host of new features and upgraded ones that should bring a fresh coat of paint to any existing GPU. Two big features will steal the show, the new Radeon Overlay and a mobile app called AMD Link. But expansions to ReLive, Wattman, Enhanced Sync, and Chill are equally compelling.

Let’s start with what I think will get the most attention and deservedly so, the Radeon Overlay. As the name would suggest, the overlay can be turned out through a hotkey in-game, and allows the gamer to access graphics card monitoring tools and many driver settings without leaving the game, having to alt-tab, or having to close the game to apply. By hitting Alt-R, a screen will show up on the right-hand side of the display, with the game continuing to run in the background. The user will be able to interact with the menu via mouse or keyboard, and then hit the same hotkey or Esc to return.

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Continue reading our look at the new AMD Radeon Softare Adrenalin Edition driver!!

NVIDIA Launches Titan V, the World's First Consumer Volta GPU with HBM2

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 7, 2017 - 11:44 PM |
Tagged: Volta, titan, nvidia, graphics card, gpu

NVIDIA made a surprising move late Thursday with the simultaneous announcement and launch of the Titan V, the first consumer/prosumer graphics card based on the Volta architecture.

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Like recent flagship Titan-branded cards, the Titan V will be available exclusively from NVIDIA for $2,999. Labeled "the most powerful graphics card ever created for the PC," Titan V sports 12GB of HBM2 memory, 5120 CUDA cores, and a 1455MHz boost clock, giving the card 110 teraflops of maximum compute performance. Check out the full specs below:

6 Graphics Processing Clusters
80 Streaming Multiprocessors
5120 CUDA Cores (single precision)
320 Texture Units
640 Tensor Cores
1200 MHz Base Clock (MHz)
1455 MHz Boost Clock (MHz)
850 MHz Memory Clock
1.7 Gbps Memory Data Rate
4608K L2 Cache Size
12288 MB HBM2 Total Video Memory
3072-bit Memory Interface
652.8 GB/s Total Memory Bandwidth
384 GigaTexels/sec Texture Rate (Bilinear)
12 nm Fabrication Process (TSMC 12nm FFN High Performance)
21.1 Billion Transistor Count
3 x DisplayPort, 1 x HDMI Connectors
Dual Slot Form Factor
One 6-pin, One 8-pin Power Connectors
600 Watts Recommended Power Supply
250 Watts Thermal Design Power (TDP)

The NVIDIA Titan V's 110 teraflops of compute performance compares to a maximum of about 12 teraflops on the Titan Xp, a greater than 9X increase in a single generation. Note that this is a very specific claim though, and references the AI compute capability of the Tensor cores rather than we traditionally measure for GPUs (single precision FLOPS). In that metric, the Titan V only truly offers a jump to 14 TFLOPS. The addition of expensive HBM2 memory also adds to the high price compared to its predecessor.

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The Titan V is available now from NVIDIA.com for $2,999, with a limit of 2 per customer. And hey, there's free shipping too.

Source: NVIDIA