Rumor: NVIDIA Working on GTX 1660 Ti without Ray Tracing

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 17, 2019 - 01:29 PM |
Tagged:

Citing word from a board partner, VideoCardz.com has published a rumor about an upcoming NVIDIA GeForce GPU based on Turing, but without ray tracing support. While such a product seems inevitable as we move further down the chain into midrange and mainstream graphics options, where ray tracing makes less sense from a performance standpoint, the name accompanying the report is harder to fathom: GTX 1660 Ti.

GTX_1660Ti_VideoCardz.jpg

Image via VideoCardz.com

"The GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is to become NVIDIA’s first Turing-based card under GTX brand. Essentially, this card lacks ray tracing features of RTX series, which should (theoretically) result in a lower price. New SKU features TU116 graphics processor and 1536 CUDA cores. This means that GTX 1660 Ti will undoubtedly be slower than RTX 2060." - VideoCardz.com

Beyond the TU116 GPU and 1536 CUDA cores, VideoCardz goes on to state that their sources also claim that this new GTX card will still make use of GDDR6 memory on the same 192-bit bus as the RTX 2060. As to the name, while it may seem odd not to adopt the same 2000-series branding for all Turing cards, the potential for confusion with RTX vs GTX branding might be the reason - if indeed cards in a 1600-series make it to market.

Source: VideoCardz

Generations of GeForce GPUs in Ubuntu

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 16, 2019 - 04:33 PM |
Tagged: linux, geforce, nvidia, ubuntu 18.04, gtx 760, gtx 960, RTX 2060, gtx 1060

If you are running an Ubuntu system with an older GPU and are curious about upgrading but unsure if it is worth it, Phoronix has a great review for you.  Whether you are gaming with OpenGL and Vulkan, or curious about the changes in OpenCL/CUDA compute performance they have you covered.  They even delve into the power efficiency numbers so you can spec out the operating costs of a large deployment, if you happen to have the budget to consider buying RTX 2060's in bulk.

cards.PNG

"In this article is a side-by-side performance comparison of the GeForce RTX 2060 up against the GTX 1060 Pascal, GTX 960 Maxwell, and GTX 760 Kepler graphics cards."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: Phoronix

GeForce Driver 417.71 Now Available, Enables G-SYNC Compatibility With FreeSync Monitors

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 15, 2019 - 03:25 AM |
Tagged: variable refresh rate, nvidia, graphics driver, gpu, geforce, g-sync compatibility, g-sync, freesync

One of NVIDIA's biggest and most surprising CES announcements was the introduction of support for "G-SYNC Compatible Monitors," allowing the company's G-SYNC-capable Pascal and Turing-based graphics cards to work with FreeSync and other non-G-SYNC variable refresh rate displays. NVIDIA is initially certifying 12 FreeSync monitors but will allow users of any VRR display to manually enable G-SYNC and determine for themselves if the quality of the experience is acceptable.

gsync-compatible-freesync.jpg

Those eager to try the feature can now do so via NVIDIA's latest driver, version 417.71, which is rolling out worldwide right now. As of the date of this article's publication, users in the United States who visit NVIDIA's driver download page are still seeing the previous driver (417.35), but direct download links are already up and running.

The current list of FreeSync monitors that are certified by NVIDIA:

Users with a certified G-SYNC compatible monitor will have G-SYNC automatically enabled via the NVIDIA Control Panel when the driver is updated and the display is connected, the same process as connecting an official G-SYNC display. Those with a variable refresh rate display that is not certified must manually open the NVIDIA Control Panel and enable G-SYNC.

NVIDIA notes, however, that enabling the feature on displays that don't meet the company's performance capabilities may lead to a range of issues, from blurring and stuttering to flickering and blanking. The good news is that the type and severity of the issues will vary by display, so users can determine for themselves if the potential problems are acceptable.

Update: Users over at the NVIDIA subreddit have created a public Google Sheet to track their reports and experiences with various FreeSync monitors. Check it out to see how others are faring with your preferred monitor.

Update 2: Our friends over at Wccftech have published a short video demonstrating how to enable G-SYNC on non-G-SYNC VRR monitors:

Source: NVIDIA

Slow light, testing ray tracing performance with Port Royal

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 14, 2019 - 02:23 PM |
Tagged: 3dmark, port royal, ray tracing

3D Mark recently released an inexpensive update to their benchmarking suite to let you test your ray tracing performance; you can grab Port Royal for a few dollars from Steam.  As there has been limited time to use the benchmark as well as a small sample of GPUs which can properly run it, it has not yet made it into most benchmarking suites.  Bjorn3D took the time to install it on a decent system and tested the performance of the Titan and the five RTX cards available on the market. 

As you can see, it is quite the punishing test, not even NVIDIA's flagship card can maintain 60fps.

3DMark-Port-Royal-screenshot-3-1024x576.jpg

"3DMark is finally updated with its newest benchmark designed specifically to test real time ray tracing performance. The benchmark we are looking at today is Port Royal, it is the first really good repeatable benchmark I have seen available that tests new real time ray tracing features."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Source: Bjorn3D

AMD Supplies First Radeon VII Benchmarks

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 12, 2019 - 08:17 AM |
Tagged: vega 64, Vega, RX VEGA 64, radeon vii, gpu, benchmarks, amd, 7nm

After announcing the Radeon VII this week at CES, AMD has quietly released its own internal benchmarks showing how the upcoming card potentially compares to the Radeon RX Vega 64, AMD's current flagship desktop GPU released in August 2017.

radeon-vii.jpg

The internal benchmarks, compiled by AMD Performance Labs earlier this month, were released as a footnote in AMD's official Radeon VII press release and first noticed by HardOCP. AMD tested 25 games and 4 media creation applications, with the Radeon VII averaging around a 29 percent improvement in games and 36 percent improvement in professional apps.

AMD's test platform for its gaming Radeon VII benchmarks was an Intel Core i7-7700K with 16GB of DDR4 memory clocked at 3000MHz running Windows 10 with AMD Driver version 18.50. CPU frequencies and exact Windows 10 version were not disclosed. AMD states that all games were run at "4K max settings" with reported frame rate results based on the average of three separate runs each.

For games, the Radeon VII benchmarks show a wide performance delta compared to RX Vega 64, from as little as 7.5 percent in Hitman 2 to as much as 68.4 percent for Fallout 76. Below is a chart created by PC Perspective from AMD's data of the frame rate results from all 25 games.

radeon-vii-benchmarks-games.jpg

In terms of media creation applications, AMD changed its testing platform to the Ryzen 7 2700X, also paired with 16GB of DDR4 at 3000MHz. Again, exact processor frequencies and other details were not disclosed. The results reveal between a 27% and 62% improvement:

radeon-vii-benchmarks-apps.jpg

It is important to reiterate that the data presented in the above charts is from AMD's own internal testing, and should therefore be viewed skeptically until third party Radeon VII benchmarks are available. However, these benchmarks do provide an interesting first look at potential Radeon VII performance compared to its predecessor.

Radeon VII is scheduled to launch February 7, 2019 with an MSRP of $699. In addition to the reference design showcased at CES, AMD has confirmed that third party Radeon VII boards will be available from the company's GPU partners.

Source: AMD

AMD Promises Full Radeon GPU Lineup Refresh in 2019

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 11, 2019 - 04:35 PM |
Tagged: video cards, Vega VII, Vega, Refresh, radeon, Mark Papermaster, graphics, gpus, cto, amd, 7nm

AMD CTO Mark Papermaster spoke with The Street in a video interview published yesterday, where he made it clear that we can indeed expect a new Radeon lineup this year. “It’s like what we do every year,” he said, “we’ll round out the whole roadmap”.

AMDRadeon_RGB.png

Part of this refresh has already been announced, of course, as Papermaster noted, “we’re really excited to start on the high end” (speaking about the Radeon VII) and he concluded with the promise that “you’ll see the announcements over the course of the year as we refresh across our Radeon roadmap”. It was not mentioned if the refreshed lineup will include 7 nm parts derived from the Vega VII shown at CES, but it seems reasonable to assume that we haven’t seen the last of Vega 2 in 2019.

Source: The Street

AMD's Radeon 7 and Third Gen Ryzen

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 9, 2019 - 01:14 PM |
Tagged: radeon 7, ces 2019, amd

AMD is still mid-keynote but that's no reason not to start filling you in on what we know, especially since the CES gang just got a free copy of The Division 2 so we may not see them for a while. 

r7 release.PNG

The new Radeon 7 looks similar to the Vega series but offers improved performance, especially at 4K resolutions.   According to their internal benchmarks you will see a noticeable improvement from the VEGA series on a number of games.

r7 game.PNG

The new card is not just for gaming, they also showed a slide covering the increases you can expect on a variety of creative software.

cc r7.PNG

As far as the specifications go, we know the card will feature 60 CUs, or 3840 Stream Processors and an impressive 16GB of HBM2 memory with a 1.8GHz GPU at the core.  It will require a pair of 8pin PCIe power connectors to drive all of that.

AMD-Radeon-VII.jpg

The card will be available on Feb 7th for an MSRP of $699, with a free copy of The Division 2 for as long as supplies last, you can also enjoy that deal on select Ryzen chips  That places it under the cost of NVIDIA's top GPUs, but significantly more than the new RTX 2060, but we still have to see where it sits in the benchmark charts!

3rd-Gen Ryzen CPUs Coming

chipllet.PNG

The new third generation Ryzen uses AMD's chiplet design, with a smaller core and a large IO chip. Code-named Matisse, the 7nm Zen 2 desktop parts are not yet ready for release, with final clock speeds not announced. (AnandTech was able to go a little deeper into the the matter before the announcement, and they offer some analysis of the feasability of adding another chiplet to the die and meeting the 16-core number some expected based on the rumors we saw prior to this event. Ed.)

power.PNG

Dr. Su did not share much information of the new chip with us on stage, though we know it may pull less power than a Core i9, at least in Cinebench.  Owners of AM4 boards can rest assured knowing that upgrading to the new chips will be as easy as a BIOS update as the socket will indeed remain the same.

am4.PNG

Expect more coverage as we catch up!

Source: AMD

VisionTek Unveils Thunderbolt 3 Mini eGFX External Graphics Enclosure

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 8, 2019 - 05:46 PM |
Tagged: visontek, thunderbolt 3, external gpu, ces 2019

VisionTek announced a new external GPU enclosure today at CES, costing $350 for the enclosure and 240W power (cinder) block.  The dual Thunderbolt 3 controllers provide enough bandwidth for your GPU as well as a pair of USB 3.0 ports, Gigabit ethernet and a SATA III port. 

mini_egpu4.jpg

At 8.5x6x2.75" it is small enough to be easily accomodated on a desk whle still able to hold a variety of cards, up to about the size of an AMD Vega 56 8GB.   It is compatible with Windows 10 and OS X and will let you string together up to six 4K displays @ 60fps.  You can see the full PR below.

The VisionTek Thunderbolt 3 Mini eGFX Enclosure is ideal for creative professionals, IT/enterprise power users, professional users in healthcare, finance, scientific research labs, etc., and gaming enthusiasts seeking the ultimate GPU performance improvement to Thunderbolt 3 equipped laptops. Delivering up to 40Gbps of bandwidth, Thunderbolt 3 is the industry’s fastest interface that is rapidly becoming popular on new generation of laptops and mini PCs. VisionTek’s Mini eGFX combined with a graphics add-in card significantly boosts the GPU performance of a Thunderbolt 3 enabled laptop, via a plug and play connection to the enclosure.

Sleek, Portable, and Future Proof for the Most Demanding Applications

The VisionTek Thunderbolt 3 Mini eGFX Enclosure combines a sleek and portable design that easily fits discretely on a desk, or hidden away, to handle all your graphic intensive applications. VisionTek’s Mini eGFX Enclosure can be plugged into any Thunderbolt 3 enabled laptop or mini-PC to accelerate the most demanding 3D intensive software programs. Best of all, the Mini eGFX enclosure can be upgraded to perfectly match the application’s performance requirements. Consumers have the option of selecting from many mini ITX cards or standard compatible graphic card models for the Mini eGFX to optimize GPU processing requirements for each user’s specific needs.

"With the launch of the Mini eGFX external enclosure, users can turbocharge their Thunderbolt 3 enabled laptops with cutting edge discrete GPU add-in cards on the fly," said Michael Innes, President, VisionTek Products, LLC. “VisionTek embraces technology innovations from Intel that enhance the way we utilize our GPU technology to increase the efficiency, performance, and resolution of 3D visual PC applications.” “The VisionTek Thunderbolt 3 Mini eGFX enclosure is one of the most compact, yet flexible eGFX enclosures available in the market today,” said Jason Ziller, General Manager, Client Connectivity Division at Intel. “With this solution, VisionTek can broadly address the many professional graphics verticals, enterprise and consumer gaming markets as it can be easily configured to fit the needs of the customer with many inter-changeable graphic cards available.”

Expansive Selection of Laptop Compatibility
Thunderbolt 3 enabled laptops and mini-PCs connected to the new VisionTek Mini eGFX dock enclosure drives the most demanding 3D graphic intensive applications. Visiontek is proud to announce compatibility and availability with many new Thunderbolt 3 equipped laptops and mini-PCs in 2019. The speed, reliability, efficiency and compact size of VisionTek’s Mini eGFX Enclosure eliminates limitations of a laptop or mini-PC environment and opens possibilities for the perfect combination of portability and performance when required.

Select from a wide performance range of add-in graphics cards certified by VisionTek to improve 3D imaging rendering, 4K HD applications, video editing, run multi-monitor displays, improve PC gaming, and more. The VisionTek Mini eGFX is design to fit most mini ITX discrete graphics cards, as well as select reference card designs. Visit VisionTek’s product page for the most current list of graphics cards recommended. Benefits of the VisionTek Thunderbolt 3 Mini eGFX Enclosure for external GPUs include:

  • Compact Design – Form & function collide to create one of the most compact and flexible enclosure designs in the industry to accommodate a variety of graphics cards (enclosure dimensions: 8.5” x 6” x 2.75”)
  • 3D Graphics Performance – Whether you’re rendering complex 3D images or playing intense first-person shooters, the eGFX enclosure supports a wide range of mini ITX size graphics cards.
  • Power – 240W of dedicated power is provided with the VisionTek Mini eGFX Enclosure.
  • Multiple Displays – Supports up to six 4K displays @ 60fps from laptops & mini PC’s. Scalable to the needs of the user with the addition of a graphics card to fit the application’s needs.
  • Maximum 3D Resolution Control –Set limits using the GPU’s proprietary firmware controls to customize resolution settings, enhance 3D performance, and assign multi-monitor layouts.
  • Additional High-Speed USB 3.0, Ethernet Connection, and SATA III Port – The design uses a second Thunderbolt controller with PCIe-to-USB and PCIe-to-LAN controllers to provide Two (2) additional USB 3.0 ports that are conveniently accessible on the front panel of the eGFX enclosure and one (1) RJ45 ethernet Gigabit LAN connection located on the back side of the enclosure.

 

Source: VisionTek

Is it midrange or not? Meet the RTX 2060

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 7, 2019 - 04:34 PM |
Tagged: video card, turing, tu106, RTX 2060, rtx, nvidia, graphics card, gpu, gddr6, gaming

After months of rumours and guesses as to what the RTX 2060 will actually offer, we finally know.  It is built on the same TU106 the RTX 2070 uses and sports somewhat similar core clocks though the drop in TC, ROPs and TUs reduces it to producing a mere 5 GigaRays.  The memory is rather different, with the 6GB of GDDR6 connected via 192-bit bus offering 336.1 GB/s of bandwidth.  As you saw in Sebastian's testing the overall performance is better than you would expect from a mid-range card but at the cost of a higher price.

If we missed out on your favourite game, check the Guru of 3D's suite of benchmarks or one of the others below. 

RTX2060_Box.jpg

"NVIDIA today announced the GeForce RTX 2060, the graphics card will be unleashed next week the 15th at a sales price of 349 USD / 359 EUR. Today, however, we can already bring you a full review of what is a pretty feisty little graphics card really."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: Guru of 3D
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Formidable Mid-Range

We have to go all the way back to 2015 for NVIDIA's previous graphics card announcement at CES, with the GeForce GTX 960 revealed during the show four years ago. And coming on the heels of this announcement today we have the latest “mid-range” offering in the tradition of the GeForce x60 (or x060) cards, the RTX 2060. This launch comes as no surprise to those of us following the PC industry, as various rumors and leaks preceded the announcement by weeks and even months, but such is the reality of the modern supply chain process (sadly, few things are ever really a surprise anymore).

RTX2060_Box.jpg

But there is still plenty of new information available with the official launch of this new GPU, not the least of which is the opportunity to look at independent benchmark results to find out what to expect with this new GPU relative to the market. To this end we had the opportunity to get our hands on the card before the official launch, testing the RTX 2060 in several games as well as a couple of synthetic benchmarks. The story is just beginning, and as time permits a "part two" of the RTX 2060 review will be offered to supplement this initial look, addressing omissions and adding further analysis of the data collected thus far.

Before getting into the design and our initial performance impressions of the card, let's look into the specifications of this new RTX 2060, and see how it relates to the rest of the RTX family from NVIDIA. We are  taking a high level look at specs here, so for a deep dive into the RTX series you can check out our previous exploration of the Turing Architecture here.

"Based on a modified version of the Turing TU106 GPU used in the GeForce RTX 2070, the GeForce RTX 2060 brings the GeForce RTX architecture, including DLSS and ray-tracing, to the midrange GPU segment. It delivers excellent gaming performance on all modern games with the graphics settings cranked up. Priced at $349, the GeForce RTX 2060 is designed for 1080p gamers, and delivers an excellent gaming experience at 1440p."

RTX2060_Thumbnail.jpg

  RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 RTX 2070 RTX 2060 GTX 1080 GTX 1070
GPU TU102 TU104 TU106 TU106 GP104 GP104
GPU Cores 4352 2944 2304 1920 2560 1920
Base Clock 1350 MHz 1515 MHz 1410  MHz 1365 MHz 1607 MHz 1506 MHz
Boost Clock 1545 MHz/
1635 MHz (FE)
1710 MHz/
1800 MHz (FE)
1620 MHz
1710 MHz (FE)
1680 MHz 1733 MHz 1683 MHz
Texture Units 272 184 144 120 160 120
ROP Units 88 64 64 48 64 64
Tensor Cores 544 368 288 240 -- --
Ray Tracing Speed 10 Giga Rays 8 Giga Rays 6 Giga Rays 5 Giga Rays -- --
Memory 11GB 8GB 8GB 6GB 8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  14000 MHz 14000 MHz 10000 MHz 8000 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit GDDR6 256-bit GDDR6 256-bit GDDR6 192-bit GDDR6 256-bit GDDR5X 256-bit GDDR5
Memory Bandwidth 616 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 336.1 GB/s 320 GB/s 256 GB/s
TDP 250 W /
260 W (FE)
215W /
225W (FE)
175 W / 185W (FE) 160 W 180 W 150 W
MSRP (current) $1200 (FE)/
$1000
$800 (FE)/
$700
$599 (FE)/ $499 $349 $549 $379

Continue reading our initial review of the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060!