Graphics Cores Past and Present; looking back at AMD's recent GPUs

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 5, 2018 - 05:50 PM |
Tagged: amd, GCN, R9 290X, r9 390x, R9 Fury X, RX VEGA 64

[H]ard|OCP have been examining the generational performance differences between GPUs, starting with NVIDIA and moving onto AMD.  In this review they compare Hawaii GCN 1.1, Fiji GCN 1.3 and Vega10 GCN 1.5 on a wide variety of games.  AMD is a more interesting case as they have made more frequent changes to their architecture, while at the same time tending towards mid-range performance as opposed to aiming for the high end of performance and pricing.  This has led to interesting results, with certain GCN versions offering more compelling upgrade paths than others.  Take a close look to see how AMD's GPUs have changed over the past five years.

AMD-Radeon-RX-Vega-64-Specifications.jpg

"Wonder how much performance you are truly getting from GPU to GPU upgrade in games? We take GPUs from AMD and compare performance gained from 2013 to 2018. This is our AMD GPU Generational Performance Part 1 article focusing on the Radeon R9 290X, Radeon R9 390X, Radeon R9 Fury X, and Radeon RX Vega 64 in 14 games."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

The Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.8.2 is live

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 28, 2018 - 01:46 PM |
Tagged: Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition, radeon, amd, 18.8.2

Hot on the heels of the NVIDIA update, AMD has released a new driver for your Radeon and Vega cards or your APU, with optimizations for Strange Brigade and F1 2018 with a focus on high resolution performance. 

rase.PNG

In addition to the new games, there are fixes for Far Cry 5 and solutions to problems some users encountered with FRTC and Instant Replay enabled.  You can grab them right here.

Support For

  • Strange Brigade
    • Up to 5% faster performance in Strange BrigadeTM using Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.8.2 on the RadeonTM RX Vega 64 (8GB) graphics card than with RadeonTM Software Adrenalin Edition 18.8.1 at 3840x2160 (4K).
    • Up to 3% faster performance in Strange BrigadeTM using Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.8.2 on the RadeonTM RX 580 (8GB) graphics card than with RadeonTM Software Adrenalin Edition 18.8.1 at 2560x1440 (1440p).
  • F1 2018

Fixed Issues

  • Some games may experience instability or stutter when playing with FRTC and Instant Replay enabled.
  • Upgrade Advisor may not appear in Radeon Settings game manager.
  • Far Cry 5 may experience dimmed or grey images with HDR10 enabled on some system configurations.
  • Far Cry 5 may experience an application hang when changing video settings on some system configurations.
  • Radeon Chill min and max values may not sync on multi GPU system configurations.
  • Radeon FreeSync may fail to enable when playing Call of Duty®: Black Ops 4.
Source: AMD
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

Your Mileage May Vary

One of the most interesting things going around in the computer hardware communities this past weekend was the revelation from a user named bryf50 on Reddit that they somehow had gotten his FreeSync display working with his NVIDIA GeForce GPU. 

For those of you that might not be familiar with the particular ins-and-outs of these variable refresh technologies, getting FreeSync displays to work on NVIDIA GPUs is potentially a very big deal.

While NVIDIA GPUs support the NVIDIA G-SYNC variable refresh rate standard, they are not compatible with Adaptive Sync (the technology on which FreeSync is based) displays. Despite Adaptive Sync being an open standard, and an optional extension to the DisplayPort specification, NVIDIA so far has chosen not to support these displays.

However, this provides some major downsides to consumers looking to purchase displays and graphics cards. Due to the lack of interoperability, consumers can get locked into a GPU vendor if they want to continue to use the variable refresh functionality of their display. Plus, Adaptive-Sync/FreeSync monitors, in general, seem to be significantly more inexpensive for similar specifications.

01.jpg

Click here to continue reading our exploration into FreeSync support on NVIDIA GPUs!

 

NVIDIA teases RTX 2080 performance and features

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Shows and Expos | August 22, 2018 - 02:06 PM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 2080, nvidia, geforce, ansel

NVIDIA has been showing off a slideshow in Germany, offering a glimpse at the new features Turing brings to the desktop as well as in-house performance numbers.  As you can see below, their testing shows a significant increase in performance from Pascal, it will be interesting to see how the numbers match up once reviewers get their hands on these cards.

TuringVsPascal_EditorsDay_Aug22_2-.png

While those performance numbers should be taken with a grain of salt or three, the various features which the new generation of chip brings to the table will appear as presented.   For fans of Ansel, you will be able to upscale your screenshots to 8k with Ansel AI UpRes, which offers an impressive implementation of anti-aliasing.  They also showed off a variety of filtres you can utilize to make your screenshots even more impressive.

up yer rez.PNG

The GigaRays of real time ray tracing capability on Turing look very impressive but with Ansel, your card has a lot more time to process reflections, refractions and shadows which means your screenshots will look significantly more impressive than what the game shows while you are playing.  In the example below you can see how much more detail a little post-processing can add.

rt scale.PNG

There are a wide variety of released and upcoming games which will support these features; 22 listed by name at the conference.  A few of the titles only support some of the new features, such as NVIDIA Highlights, however the games below should offer full support, as well as framerates high enough to play at 4k with HDR enabled.

TuringVsPascal_EditorsDay_Aug22.png

Keep your eyes peeled for more news from NVIDIA and GamesCom.

Source: NVIDIA

Turing vs Volta: Two Chips Enter. No One Dies.

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 21, 2018 - 08:43 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, Volta, turing, tu102, gv100

In the past, when NVIDIA launched a new GPU architecture, they would make a few designs for each of their market segments. All SKUs would be one of those chips, with varying amounts of it disabled or re-clocked to hit multiple price points. The mainstream enthusiast (GTX -70/-80) chip of each generation is typically 300mm2, and the high-end enthusiast (Titan / -80 Ti) chip is often around 600mm2.

nvidia-2016-gtc-pascal-banner.png

Kepler used quite a bit of that die space for FP64 calculations, but that did not happen with consumer versions of Pascal. Instead, GP100 supported 1:2:4 FP64:FP32:FP16 performance ratios. This is great for the compute community, such as scientific researchers, but games are focused on FP32. Shortly thereafter, NVIDIA releases GP102, which had the same number of FP32 cores (3840) as GP100 but with much-reduced 64-bit performance… and much reduced die area. GP100 was 610mm2, but GP102 was just 471mm2.

At this point, I’m thinking that NVIDIA is pulling scientific computing chips away from the common user to increase the value of their Tesla parts. There was no reason to either make a cheap 6XXmm2 card available to the public, and a 471mm2 part could take the performance crown, so why not reap extra dies from your wafer (and be able to clock them higher because of better binning)?

nvidia-2017-sc17-japanaisuper.jpg

And then Volta came out. And it was massive (815mm2).

At this point, you really cannot manufacture a larger integrated circuit. You are at the limit of what TSMC (and other fabs) can focus onto your silicon. Again, it’s a 1:2:4 FP64:FP32:FP16 ratio. Again, there is no consumer version in sight. Again, it looked as if NVIDIA was going to fragment their market and leave consumers behind.

And then Turing was announced. Apparently, NVIDIA still plans on making big chips for consumers… just not with 64-bit performance. The big draw of this 754mm2 chip is its dedicated hardware for raytracing. We knew this technology was coming, and we knew that the next generation would have technology to make this useful. I figured that meant consumer-Volta, and NVIDIA had somehow found a way to use Tensor cores to cast rays. Apparently not… but, don’t worry, Turing has Tensor cores too… they’re just for machine-learning gaming applications. Those are above and beyond the raytracing ASICs, and the CUDA cores, and the ROPs, and the texture units, and so forth.

nvidia-2018-geforce-rtx-turing-630-u.jpg

But, raytracing hype aside, let’s think about the product stack:

  1. NVIDIA now has two ~800mm2-ish chips… and
  2. They serve two completely different markets.

In fact, I cannot see either FP64 or raytracing going anywhere any time soon. As such, it’s my assumption that NVIDIA will maintain two different architectures of GPUs going forward. The only way that I can see this changing is if they figure out a multi-die solution, because neither design can get any bigger. And even then, what workload would it even perform? (Moment of silence for 10km x 10km video game maps.)

What do you think? Will NVIDIA keep two architectures going forward? If not, how will they serve all of their customers?

Asus Announces ROG Strix, Dual, and Turbo Series RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 Graphics Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 03:08 PM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, nvidia, geforce, asus

Following Jensen Huang's reveal of the RTX family of Turing-based graphics cards, Asus announced that it will have graphics cards from its ROG Strix, Dual, and Turbo product lines available in mid-September. The new graphics cards will be based around the NVIDIA Geforce RTX 2080 Ti and the Geforce RTX 2080 GPUs.

Asus ROG Strix RTX 2080.jpg

According to Asus, their new Turing-based graphics cards will be built using their Auto-Extreme technology and with redesigned coolers to increase card-to-card product consistency and cooling efficiency. The triple fan ROG Strix and dual fan Dual series cards use a new 2.7 slot design that results in 20% and 50% increases (respectively) in cooling array surface area versus their 1000 series predecessors. The ROG Strix card uses Axial fans that reportedly offer better airflow and IP5X dust resistance while the Dual series cards use Wing Blade fans that also offer dust resistance along with being allegedly quieter while pushing more air. Meanwhile, the Turbo series uses a blower-style cooler that has been redesigned and uses an 80mm dual ball bearing fan with a new shroud that allows for more airflow even in small cases or when cards are sandwiched together in a multi-GPU setup.

The ROG Strix RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 cards will have one USB Type-C (VirtualLink), two HDMI 2.0b, and two Display Port 1.4a outputs. The Dual RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 cards will have one USB Type-C, one HDMI 2.0b, and three Display Port 1.4 outputs. Finally, the Turbo series RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 cards will have one USB Type-C, one HDMI 2.0b, and two Display Port 1.4 ports.

  RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 
GPU TU102 TU104
GPU Cores 4352 2944
Base Clock 1350 MHz (Turbo model) 1515 MHz (Turbo model)
Boost Clock 1545 MHz (Turbo model) 1710 MHz (Turbo model)
Tensor Cores 576 384
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 8 GRays/s
Memory 11GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz 
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 256-bit G6
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 448 GB/s
TDP ?
Process Tech 12nm 12nm

Exact specification are still unknown though Asus did reveal clockspeeds for the Turbo models which are listed above. The clockspeeds for the Dual and ROG Strix cards should be quite a bit higher than those thanks to the much beefier coolers, and the OC Editions in particular should be clocked higher than reference specs.

Asus Turbo RTX 2080 Ti.jpg

Asus did not disclose exact MSRP pricing, but it did state that several models will be available for pre-order starting today and will be officially avaialble in the middle of September. It appears that a couple RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 cards have already appeared on Newegg, but not all of them have shown up yet. The models slated to be available for preorder include the Dual GeForce RTX 2080 Ti OC Edition, Turbo RTX 2080 Ti, ROG Strix GeForce RTX 2080 OC Edition, and the Dual RTX 2080 OC Edition.

Related reading:

Source: Asus

NVIDIA Announces GeForce RTX 2070, RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti at Gamescom 2018

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 01:58 PM |
Tagged: turing, tensor cores, rtx 2080ti, RTX 2080, RTX 2070, rtx, rt cores, ray tracing, quadro, preorder, nvidia, gtx, geforce

Amazon.com has its preorder and product listing pages for the various GeForce RTX cards live!

* Update *

NVIDIA's pre-order page is now live, as well as info on the RTX 2070! Details below:

2018-08-20-13-22-43-.png

*Update 2 *

Post-Founders Edition pricing comes in a bit lower than the Founders pricing noted above:

2018-08-20-13-59-58-.png

* End update *

Much to no one's surprise after the launch of the Quadro RTX lineup and the many subsequent leaks, today NVIDIA officially announced their next generation GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti gaming GPUs.

Just like we saw with the Quadro RTX lineup, NVIDIA is designating these gaming-oriented graphics card with the RTX brand to emphasize their capabilities with ray tracing.

Through the combination of dedicated Ray Tracing  (RT) cores and Tensor cores for AI-powered denoising, NVIDIA is claiming these RTX GPUs are capable of high enough ray tracing performance to be used real-time in games, as shown by their demos of titles of Battlefield V, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, and Metro: Exodus.

Not every GPU in NVIDIA's lineup will be capable of this real-time ray tracing performance, with those lower tier cards retaining the traditional GTX branding.

Here are the specifications as we know them so far compared to the Quadro RTX cards, as well as the previous generation GeForce cards, and the top offering from AMD.

  RTX 2080 Ti Quadro RTX 6000 GTX 1080 Ti RTX 2080  Quadro RTX 5000 GTX 1080 TITAN V RX Vega 64 (Air) RTX 2070
GPU TU102 TU102 GP102 TU104 TU104 GP104 GV100 Vega 64 ?
GPU Cores 4352 4608 3584 2944 3072 2560 5120 4096 2304
Base Clock 1350 ? 1408 MHz 1515 ? 1607 MHz 1200 MHz 1247 MHz 1410
Boost Clock 1545
1635 FE
? 1582 MHz 1710
1800 FE
? 1733 MHz 1455 MHz 1546 MHz 1620
1710 FE
Texture Units ? ? 224 ? ? 160 320 256 ?
ROP Units ? ? 88 ? ? 64 96 64 ?
Tensor Cores 576 576 -- 384 384 -- 640 -- ?
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 10 GRays/s -- 8 GRays/s 6? GRays/s -- -- -- 6 GRays/s
Memory 11GB 24GB 11GB 8GB 16GB 8GB 12GB  8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  11000 MHz 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  10000 MHz 1700 MHz 1890 MHz 14000 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 384-bit G6 352-bit G5X 256-bit G6 256-bit G6 256-bit G5X 3072-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2 256-bit G6
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 672GB/s 484 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 320 GB/s 653 GB/s 484 GB/s 448GB/s
TDP 250W
260 FE
300 watts 250 watts 215W
225W FE
? 180 watts 250W 292 175W
185 FE
Peak Compute ? ? 10.6 TFLOPS ? ? 8.2 TFLOPS 14.9 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS ?
Transistor Count ? ? 12.0 B ? ? 7.2 B 21.0 B 12.5 B ?
Process Tech 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 14nm ?
MSRP (current) $1200/
$1000
$6,300 $699 $800/
$700
$2,300 $549 $2,999 $499

$600/
$500

We hope to fill out the rest of the information on these GPUs in the coming days during subsequent press briefings during Gamescom.

One big change to the RTX lineup is NVIDIA's revised Founders Edition cards. Instead of the blower-style cooler that we've seen on every other NVIDIA reference design, the Founder's Edition RTX cards instead move to a dual-axial fan setup, similar to 3rd party designs in the past.

These new GPUs do not come cheaply, however, with an increased MSRP across the entire lineup when compared to the 1000-series cards. The RTX 2080 Ti's MSRP of $1200 is an increase of $500 over the previous generation GTX 1080 Ti, while the GTX 2080 sports a $200 increase over the GTX 2080. These prices will come down after the Founders Edition wave pricing passes (the same was done with the GTX 10xx launches).

Both the Founder's Edition card from NVIDIA, as well as third-party designs from partners such as EVGA and ASUS, are available for preorder from retailers including Amazon and Newegg starting today and are set to ship on August 27th.

Source: NVIDIA

Newegg Lists GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti Graphics Cards Before Announcement

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 12:15 PM |
Tagged: video card, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, nvidia, newegg, graphics, gpu, geforce

Newegg has listed NVIDIA GeForce RTX cards ahead of a probably announcement at today's "BeForTheGame" event in Germany, apparently confirming the rumors about the existence of these two GPUs. Both RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti cards are featured on this Newegg promo page:

RTX.PNG

Clearly this went live a bit early (none of the linked RTX products bring up a valid page yet) as NVIDIA's announcement has yet to take place, though live coverage continues on NVIDIA's Twitch channel now.

Source: Newegg

NVIDIA Announcement Live Stream at 12:00 PM Eastern Today

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 11:30 AM |
Tagged: video card, nvidia, live stream, graphics, gpu, announcement

The wait (and endless speculation) is nearly over, as NVIDIA will will be hosting their "BeForTheGame" event with probable product announcements at noon eastern today, and this will be streamed live on the company's Twitch channel.

You can watch the event right here:

Watch live video from NVIDIA on www.twitch.tv

Will there be new GeForce cards? Is it GTX or RTX? Were the rumors true or totally off-base? There is only one way to find out! (And of course we will cover any news stories emerging from this event, so stay tuned!)

Source: Twitch.tv

Rumor: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti Product and PCB Images Leak

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 17, 2018 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: VideoCardz, video card, rumor, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, report, pcb, nvidia, leak, graphics, gpu

The staff at VideoCardz.com have been a very busy of late, posting various articles on rumored NVIDIA graphics cards expected to be revealed this month. Today in particular we are seeing more (and more) information and imagery concerning what seems assured to be RTX 2080 branding, and somewhat surprising is the rumor that the RTX 2080 Ti will launch simultaneously (with a reported 4352 CUDA cores, no less).

MSI_RTX2080_Cards.jpg

Reported images of MSI GAMING X TRIO variants of RTX 2080/2080 Ti (via VideoCardz)

From the reported product images one thing in particular stand out, as memory for each card appears unchanged from current GTX 1080 and 1080 Ti cards, at 8GB and 11GB, respectively (though a move to GDDR6 from GDDR5X has also been rumored/reported).

Even (reported) PCB images are online, with this TU104-400-A1 quality sample pictured on Chiphell via VideoCardz.com:

RTX2080_PCB.jpg

The TU104-400-A1 pictured is presumed to be the RTX 2080 GPU (Chiphell via VideoCardz)

Other product images from AIB partners (PALIT and Gigabyte) were recently posted over at VideoCardz.com if you care to take a look, and as we near a likely announcement it looks like the (reported) leaks will keep on coming.

Source: VideoCardz