Diminishing returns strikes again

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 17, 2009 - 05:39 PM |
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Picking up one EVGA GTX 280 will run you almost $500, in order to replicate motherboard.org's review you would need to spend $1500, plus the 1200W PSU needed to power your system.  Seeing as how performance is provided in bulk, you might hope buying a three pack of GTX 280's would result in a diminished cost but that is not the case.  Even leaving aside the fact that not every program can handle multiple graphics cards, the scalablity really make

New details on Intel Larrabee architecture and development coming

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 13, 2009 - 06:00 PM |
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We at PC Perspective are about as familiar with the upcoming Intel Larrabee technology as anyone outside of Intel can be; we have covered it at various stages of the development process since early 2007.  For those of you unfamiliar, Larrabee is a future graphics technology from Intel based around a many-core x86 architecture.  Our coverage thus far:

Caustic graphics threathens with ray tracing acceleration card

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 13, 2009 - 01:24 AM |
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Quoteth the wikipedia:

In optics, a caustic is the envelope of light rays reflected or refracted by a curved surface or object, or the projection of that envelope of rays on another surface. Caustic can also refer to the curve to which light rays are tangent, defining a boundary of an envelope of rays as a curve of concentrated light.

More interesting GPU moves coming from NVIDIA

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 13, 2009 - 12:50 AM |
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After the release and rebranding of the GeForce GTS 250 graphics card this month, it appears that NVIDIA might have some more "new" products coming down the pipeline.  And by "new" I mean "not really new at all."

Source: Fudzilla

Can two midranges make a high end?

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 12, 2009 - 01:18 PM |
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On the one hand,

Source: [H]ard|OCP

This little brother is worth watching

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 9, 2009 - 12:47 PM |
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Sitting somewhere between $300 and $350, the GTX 285 isn't a mid-range card, but it is not quite at the power level that the GTX 295 and HD4870 X2 are.  At Legit Reviews there are two different models of 285 up for review, PNY's GeForce GTX 285 is a stock card with 648MHz core, 1476MHz shader, and 2484MHz memory.

BFG TECHNOLOGIES ANNOUNCES WATERCOOLED GEFORCE GTX 285

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 9, 2009 - 11:54 AM |
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Lake Forest, IL - (March 9, 2009) - BFG Technologies, Inc., the leading North American and European supplier of advanced NVIDIA-based 3D graphics cards, power supplies, and the Phobos High-Performance Gaming/Home Theater System, announced today the BFG GeForce GTX 285 H2O graphics card with ThermoIntelligence Water Cooling Solution.

The BFG NVIDIA GeForce GTX 285 H2O 1GB graphics card features a totally silent, exceptionally efficient BFG ThermoIntelligence copper water block.

Author:
Manufacturer: AMD
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A Bit of History

Initial rumors had the RV790 pegged as a speed optimized RV770, which currently powers the Radeon HD 4800 series of cards. Recent information has hinted that there is far more than a simple speed increase, and AMD could be catching us unawares with a potentially exciting new part. I take a look at AMD's releases over the past two years and make a few guesses as to what we might expect to see.

Update: Upcoming Catalyst 9.3 last to support R500 and below

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 5, 2009 - 12:00 AM |
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I just found out with the upcoming release of the Catalyst 9.3 driver (sometime in mid-March), ATI will officially stop supporting Radeon cards based on the R500 architecture and earlier with the monthly driver releases.  Instead, those older GPUs will be supported on a quarterly driver release schedule.  (Note: Catalyst 9.3 will support ALL Radeon GPUs - 9.4 and beyond will implement "legacy status" on the aforementioned cards.)

Could someone please put the marketers back where they belong

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 3, 2009 - 12:39 PM |
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Apart from the die shrink and a small increase in the memory size and default clocks, the newly announced NVIDIA GTS 250 is an 8800GTS that spent a short while as the 9800 GTX (sometimes with a +).  Knowing that, it really comes as no surprise that the card performs almost identically to it's previous incarnations in Ryan's testing; there is really no benefit to be seen until you look at power consumption and heat.  The GTS 250 does require noticeably less power at idle and full load thanks to the smaller die process and the PCB is e