AMD's new DX11 compatible embedded E6760 GPU can handle 6 displays

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | May 3, 2011 - 11:54 AM |
Tagged: e6760, embedded, gpu, amd, eyefinity

Usually reading off a list of the abilities of an embedded GPU are fairly quick ... determine if it can handle YouTube in high definition and maybe play WoW and move on.  APUs offer a bit more interest for enthusiasts with interesting load sharing applications with a discreet GPU and the rise of SandyBridge and Bobcat seem to spell the end of the GPU embedded on a motherboard.  However there are still a few tricks left before the end of the line, the new Radeon E6760 isn't going to win many speed races but it can support up to 6 monitors, a nice trick when you consider that many of these chips will be running displays in casinos, airports and medical imaging.  The E4690 is finally retiring, meet the new E6760 at AnandTech.

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"Kicking off our coverage of embedded GPUs is AMD’s Radeon E6760, which is launching today. The E6760 is the latest and greatest AMD embedded video card, utilizing the Turks GPU (6600/6700M) from AMD’s value lineup. The E6760 isn’t a product most of us will be buying directly, but if AMD has it their way it’s a product a lot of us will be seeing in action in the years to come in embedded devices."

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Tech Talk

Source: AnandTech

AMD Catalyst 11.4 for Linux Released

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Chipsets | May 3, 2011 - 11:54 AM |
Tagged: ubuntu, rhel, Red Hat, opensuse, linux, driver, catalyst, ati, amd

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In a previous article we stated:

"Highlights of the Linux AMD Catalyst™ 11.4 release include: This release of AMD Catalyst™ Linux introduces support for the following new operating systems Ubuntu 11.04 support (early look) SLED/SLES 10 SP4 support (early look) RHEL 5.6 support (production)"

AMD introduced a new feature into Linux with Catalyst™ 11.4, PowerXpress.

  • PowerXpress: Will enable certain mainstream mobile chipsets to seemlessly switch from integrated graphics to the dedicated graphics. *note: This only applies to Intel Processors with on chip graphics and AMD dedicated graphics and must be switched on by invoking switchlibGL and switchlibglx and restarting the Xorg server.

If you are running RHEL 5.6 or SLED/SLES 10 SP4 and need the driver you can get it here.

If you are running Ubuntu 11.04, install the driver under the "Additional Drivers" program.

If you are running a BSD variant you must still use the Open-Source driver "Radeon" and "RadeonHD" as AMD has yet to release a BSD driver.

Be sure to check back to PCPer for my complete review of the 11.4 driver and PowerXpress.

Source: AMD

AMD Llano Integrated Graphics Looks Like HD 6550

Subject: Graphics Cards, Processors | May 2, 2011 - 07:59 PM |
Tagged: llano, fusion, amd

On Valentine’s Day, AMD reached out to us after our relationship with Intel’s Sandy B. broke down. A mug, some chocolate, and a promise of a wonderful date with their good friend Llano was AMD’s hope to help us move on to a more stable relationship. Months have gone by and we have made up with Sandy with many a great SATAday spent together. While Llano has yet to appear, AMD did urge us to keep waiting by revealing some of her measurements and an option for another playful partner.

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Image from Donanim Haber

Llano’s GPU, as reported by Donanim Haber (translated to English), will feature 400 stream processors which will be clocked at 594 MHz. TechPowerUp also reports that it will be DirectX 11 compatible as expected and can pair up with one of AMD’s “Turks” based discrete GPUs: the HD 6570 and HD 6670. This combined GPU will be registered to the system as a Radeon HD6690 using Hybrid CrossFireX.

Just under two weeks ago we reviewed the aforementioned "Turks" based HD 6670 and 6570 with games like Left 4 Dead 2. Alone, those cards were able to play many games with antialiasing for people with monitor resolutions of 1680x1050. Llano will not perform as well as those cards but should be able to play those same games, and others, with just a few settings reduced. That said, Llano is also not a discrete card and thus it is not necessarily fair to compare it with one. Lastly, Llano can also be paired with those cards for further performance benefits making them all the more enticing for gamers not wishing to purchase higher end discrete graphics cards.

Source: Donanimhaber

Which is better, three heads from NVIDIA or three from AMD

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 2, 2011 - 03:46 PM |
Tagged: tri-fire, triple, crossfilre, 3-way, sli, GTX580, HD6990, HD6970

[H]ard|OCP just finished a review that most enthusiasts would sell their souls ... or at least cash in their retirement savings ... to do themselves.  They decided to find out which was better, a $1500 triple GTX 580 system or a $1100 HD 6990 + HD 6970 system.  The findings are really quite clear, as is th efact that scaling has improved to the point where dropping that third GPU into your PC actually does make some sense to do.

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"We've seen what a Radeon HD 6990 can do when paired with a Radeon HD 6970 for "Tri-Fire" performance. Now it is time to find out what three NVIDIA GeForce GTX 580 video cards in 3-Way SLI game like in comparison. We will look at A2A performance comparisons and discuss which setup offers the best gameplay experience."

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Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Battlefield 3 footage looks impressive, will it appease PC gamers?

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | April 28, 2011 - 11:36 AM |
Tagged: graphics, battlefield 3, battlefield

Got 12 minutes to spare?  No, how about at least a few?  I promise you'll be pretty impressed by what you see.  I think I am late to the game in posting this but EA released a 12 minute video showing gameplay of the upcoming Battlefield 3 game.  While we don't know anything about the minimum specifications of the game yet, we can assume that it will indeed take advantage of some of the latest graphics hardware.  

Take a look!  And if you are really tight on time, just to the 2:30 mark.

Considering that many people were disappointed in the appearance of the recently released Crysis 2, the considerable work being put into the Battlefield 3 PC game is going to be well appreciated.  In fact, this quote from developer DICE really proves our point that "building for consoles" is stupid:

"So for our target of what we want to hit, we are now using the more powerful platform to try and prove what we see gaming being in the future rather than using the lowest common denominator, instead of developing it for the consoles and then just adding higher resolution textures and anti-aliasing for the PC version. We’re do it the other way around, we start with the highest-end technology that we can come up with and then scale it back to the consoles."

Source: YouTube

AMD 990FX, 990X and 970 chipsets to get NVIDIA SLI Support

Subject: Graphics Cards, Motherboards, Chipsets | April 28, 2011 - 09:45 AM |
Tagged: sli, nvidia, amd, 990x, 990fx, 970

In a move that is long overdue, NVIDIA's Tom Peteresen announced on a blog post that SLI multi-GPU support was finally going to be offered on AMD platforms with the upcoming launch of the AMD 990FX, 990X and 970 chipsets.  On previous AMD platforms users have not been able to use multiple NVIDIA graphics cards in SLI because NVIDIA simply did not allow licensing of the technology on them.  As of this month, that policy is changing.

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According to the post, NVIDIA has had a change of heart and wants to "make sure gamers can benefit from the new CPU competitive landscape and ensure they have NVIDIA SLI – the highest performance, most stable multi-GPU solution - to game on!"  The lack of SLI on previous chipsets was the result of Intel being the dominate CPU platform of choice for gamers in recent years. 

ASUS, Gigabyte, ASRock, and MSI are going to be the first out of the block with motherboard based on the AMD 990FX, 990X and 970 chipsets with SLI support according to NVIDIA's Petersen. 

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This doesn't change NVIDIA's stance on the whole licensing and charging motherboard vendors to integrate SLI thing, however.  In an ideal world, NVIDIA would have announced that they were opening up SLI to work on ANY motherboard, future or present, that has enough PCI Express slots on them, just like we see today with AMD's own CrossFire technology.  Despite pressure to do that, NVIDIA is standing by its current formula and expanding into the realm of AMD chipsets.  

Regardless, today is a good day for AMD fans and gamers alike that want more choice and more variety in their system build options for the future.  The AMD Llano and Bulldozer-based processors just got a little more gaming friendly.

Source: NVIDIA

AMD Radeon HD 6770 and 6750 Launch, add Blu-ray 3D decode acceleration

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 28, 2011 - 12:49 AM |
Tagged: radeon, amd, 6770, 6750, 5770, 5750

After the release of the AMD Radeon HD 6790 graphics card earlier this month that brought the Barts GPU architecture down to the sub-$150 graphics market, we expected to see something in a similar vein from the updated HD 6770 and HD 6750 cards.  But it was not to be: the Radeon HD 6770 and HD 6750 will continue in nearly an identical fashion to that of the Radeon HD 5770 and HD 5750 as we know them today.

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When released back in October of 2009, the Radeon HD 5770 and HD 5750 were based on the Juniper 40nm GPU, ran at clock speeds of 850 MHz and 700 MHz respectively and included 1GB of GDDR5 memory running at either 1200 MHz or 1150 MHz.  Today, as the Radeon HD 6770 and HD 6750 see light, we are greeted with basically identical specs:

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Read on for more information!

Source: AMD
Author:
Manufacturer: EVGA
Tagged: nvidia, gtx 460, gpu, evga, 2win

A Card Unlike Any Other

Introduction

In all honesty, there aren't many graphics cards that really get our attention these days.  There are GPUs that do that - releases like the Radeon HD 6990 and the GeForce GTX 590 get our juices flowing to see what new performance and features they can offer.  But in terms of individual vendor-specific designs, there are very few that make us "perk up" much more than just seeing another reference card come across the test bed.  

The ASUS ARES dual-5870 card was probably the last one do to that - and for $1200 is better have!  EVGA is ready with another card though that definitely made us interested, and for a much more reasonable price of $419 or so.

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The EVGA GeForce GTX 460 2WIN is a custom built card that combines a pair of GTX 460 1GB GPUs on a single PCB to create a new level of performance and pricing that we found was unmatched in the market today.  And even better, the features improved as well by utilizing the power of both GPUs in an SLI configuration.  

Read on and see why the GTX 460 2WIN might be my new favorite graphics card!

Feeding the GTX560 Red Bull; introducing the GTX 560 Ti Hawk

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 26, 2011 - 02:55 PM |
Tagged: gtx560 ti, hawk, overclocked GPU, msi

NVIDIA's GTX 550 Ti did not do so well when Ryan reviewed it, as it simply wasn't fast enough to justify the price is being sold at.  Now its bigger brother, the MSI GTX 560 Ti Hawk has made an appearance on the [H]ard|OCP review bench.  Sticking with their usual milieu with the Hawk series, the only original part on this MSI card is the Fermi silicon, the PCB, GDDR5 and cooler are all specifically designed and implemented for this series of card. Can the overclock match the HD6950 which costs only $20 more?  

H_gtx560tiHawk.jpg

"Microstar's latest Hawk video card is here, packing a highly overclocked NVIDIA GeForce GTX 560 Ti. Can its enhanced PCB and cooler fend off the Radeon HD 6950's falling prices? Does it actually offer anything over a standard GeForce GTX 560 Ti? The end results are incredible and price drops have completely changed the landscape."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

NVIDIA Synergy will offer discrete and integrated GPU support on Sandy Bridge

Subject: Graphics Cards, Motherboards | April 26, 2011 - 02:19 PM |
Tagged: virtu, synergy, optimus, nvidia, lucid, gpu

Remember when we previewed a piece of software from Lucid called Virtu that promised the capability to combine processor graphics features of the Intel Sandy Bridge lineup with the performance and DX11 support of discrete graphics cards from NVIDIA and AMD?  The ideas was pretty simple but it addressed one of our major complaints about the initial Sandy Bridge processor launch: the IGP features like fast video transcode acceleration and ultra-low-power video acceleration were unavailable to users that chose to also use a discrete graphics solution.

Lucid's Virtu software running in our previous testing

Lucid's solution was to "virtualize" the GPUs and use a software layer that would decide which applications to run on the discrete GPU and which to run on the integrated processor graphics on the Intel CPU.  There were some limitations including the need to have the displays connected to the IGP outputs rather than the discrete card and that the software worked on a rather clunky white-list implementation.  Also, discrete graphics control panels were a bit of a headache and only worked with NVIDIA cards and not in all cases even then.  

Virtu was to be distributed through motherboard vendors starting with the release of the Z68 chipset (as it was the first mainstream chipset to support overclocking AND display outputs) but now it appears that NVIDIA itself is diving into the same realm with a new piece of software called "Synergy".  

Check out more after the break!

Source: VR-Zone