Author:
Manufacturer: MSI

Our First Look

Over the years, the general trend for new GPU launches, especially GPUs from new graphics architecture is to launch only with the "reference" graphics card designs, developed by AMD or NVIDIA. While the idea of a "reference" design has changed over the years, with the introduction of NVIDIA's Founders Edition cards, and different special edition designs at launch from AMD like we saw with Vega 56 and Vega 64, generally there aren't any custom designs from partners available at launch.

However with the launch of NVIDIA's Turing architecture, in the form of the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti, we've been presented with an embarrassment of riches in the form of plenty of custom cooler and custom PCB designs found from Add-in Board (AIB) Manufacturers.

Today, we're taking a look at our first custom RTX 2080 design, the MSI RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio.

MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio
Base Clock Speed 1515 MHz
Boost Clock Speed 1835 MHz
Memory Clock Speed 7000 MHz GDDR6
Outputs DisplayPort x 3 (v1.4) / HDMI 2.0b x 1 / USB Type-C x1 (VirtualLink)
Dimensions

12.9-in x 5.5-in x 2.1-in (327 x 140 x 55.6 mm)

Weight 3.42 lbs (1553 g)
Price $849.99

Introduced with the GTX 1080 Ti, the Gaming X Trio is as you might expect, a triple fan design, that makes up MSI's highest performance graphics card offering.

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Click here to continue reading our review of the MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Gaming X TRio

More RTX facts for your enjoyment

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 21, 2018 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: RTX 2080, nvidia, TU104

The Tech Report takes a look at the less of the two new Turing cards, the RTX 2080.  It has not been as well received as the 2080 Ti as it is very similar in performance to the GTX 1080 Ti.  One possible area which the new card might hold an advantage is in frametimes, with the new card providing smoother performance, as opposed to raw frames per second.  As their review shows, this is true in some cases but not all; see if your preferred games might benefit from the new RTX while we await releases which support the new features present on the RTX series.

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"Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2080 brings Turing to a price point that's more accessible than the flagship RTX 2080 Ti. At $800, however, the Founders Edition card we're testing still has to contend with the GTX 1080 Ti in today's games. We see whether the RTX 2080 can establish a foothold as gamers await its future potential."

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Graphics Cards

EVGA Launches RTX 20-Series XC Ultra Gaming Graphics Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 20, 2018 - 03:21 AM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, nvidia, evga

NVIDIA's Turing-based 2000 series graphics cards are finally official, and partners are unleashing all manner of custom cards based on the new GPU. EVGA is launching the RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 under a new XC Ultra Gaming series that uses a translucent shroud (with a very Gameboy Color nostalgia vibe) that wraps a dual fan ICX2 cooler in customizable white, black, and red trim and a large multi-heatpipe cooler to pair with the Turing GPU and GDDR6 memory.

EVGA RTX 2080 Ti XC Ultra Gaming.jpg

EVGA is introducing four XC Ultra Gaming series cards, with two RTX 2080 Tis and two RTX 2080s which differ in price and boost clockspeeds. The graphics cards feature 2.75 slot designs with ICX2 coolers and hydro dynamic bearing fans. EVGA claims the cooler is 14% cooler and 19% quieter. The taller card design reportedly allows for a taller fan hub and thicker blades that can push air through the thicker heatsink without extra noise (whereas its 2-slot cards use a smaller fan hub with more blades to try to balance things). Display outputs include three DisplayPort, one HDMI, and one USB-C VirtualLink.

The EVGA RTX 2080 Ti XC Ultra Gaming comes in two models: the 11G-P4-2383-KR and 11G-P4-2382-KR. Memory clocks on the 11GB of GDDR6 memory is clocked at 14000 MHz on both models, but the $1,199.99 11G-P4-2382-KR features a 1635 MHz boost clock for its 4352 CUDA cores while the $1,249.99 11G-P4-2383-KR takes things up a notch to a 1650 MHz boost clock. Of course, enthusiasts can use EVGA's Precision X1 or NVIDIA's new OC Scanner software to overclock on their own. The RTX 2080 Ti graphics cards have 2 8-pin power connectors.

EVGA RTX 2080 Ti XC Ultra Gaming Backplate.jpg

As far as the RTX 2080 XC Ultra Gaming cards, the $799.99 08G-P4-2182-KR and the $849.99 08G-P4-2183-KR pair a TU104 GPU with 2944 CUDA cores with 8GB of GDDR6 memory clocked at 14000 MHz. The cheaper model features a 1815 MHz boost clock while the higher priced model clocks in at 1850 MHz. EVGA's RTX 2080 XC Ultra Gaming cards use a 6+8 pin power connectors.

EVGA's XC Ultra Gaming cards come with a 3-year warranty and are currently being offered on the company's website. While they were previously available for pre-order, at the time of writing the cards are listed as auto-notify presumably due to the launch window slipping back a week.

What are your thoughts on EVGA's take on Turing?

Related:

Source: EVGA

Goodbye NDA, hello RTXs!

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 19, 2018 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: turing, tu102, RTX 2080 Ti, rtx, ray tracing, nvidia, gtx, geforce, founders edition, DLSS

Today is the day the curtain is pulled back and the performance of NVIDIA's Turing based consumer cards is revealed.  If there was a benchmark, resolution or game that was somehow missed in our review then you will find it below, but make sure to peek in at the last page for a list of the games which will support Ray Tracing, DLSS or both! 

The Tech Report found that the RTX 2080 Ti is an amazing card to use if you are playing Hellblade: Senua's Sacrifice as it clearly outperforms cards from previous generations as well as the base RTX 2080.  In many cases the RTX 2080 matches the GTX 1080 Ti, though with the extra features it is an attractive card for those with GPUs several generations old.  There is one small problem for those looking to adopt one of these cards, we have not seen prices like these outside of the Titan series before now.

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"Nvidia's Turing architecture is here on board the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, and we put it through its paces for 4K HDR gaming with some of today's most cutting-edge titles. We also explore the possibilities of Nvidia's Deep Learning Super-Sampling tech for the future of 4K gaming. Join us as we put Turing to the test."

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Graphics Cards

 

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

New Generation, New Founders Edition

At this point, it seems that calling NVIDIA's 20-series GPUs highly anticipated would be a bit of an understatement. Between months and months of speculation about what these new GPUs would be called, what architecture they would be based off, and what features they would bring, the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti were officially unveiled in August, alongside the Turing architecture.

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We've already posted our deep dive into the Turing architecture and the TU 102 and TU 104 GPUs powering these new graphics cards, but here's a short take away. Turing provides efficiency improvements in both memory and shader performance, as well as adds additional specialized hardware to accelerate both deep learning (Tensor cores), and enable real-time ray tracing (RT cores).

  RTX 2080 Ti Quadro RTX 6000 GTX 1080 Ti RTX 2080  Quadro RTX 5000 GTX 1080 TITAN V RX Vega 64 (Air)
GPU TU102 TU102 GP102 TU104 TU104 GP104 GV100 Vega 64
GPU Cores 4352 4608 3584 2944 3072 2560 5120 4096
Base Clock 1350 MHz 1455 MHz 1408 MHz 1515 MHz 1620 MHz 1607 MHz 1200 MHz 1247 MHz
Boost Clock 1545 MHz/
1635 MHz (FE)
1770 MHz 1582 MHz 1710 MHz/
1800 MHz (FE)
1820 MHz 1733 MHz 1455 MHz 1546 MHz
Texture Units 272 288 224 184 192 160 320 256
ROP Units 88 96 88 64 64 64 96 64
Tensor Cores 544 576 -- 368 384 -- 640 --
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 10 GRays/s -- 8 GRays/s 8 GRays/s -- -- --
Memory 11GB 24GB 11GB 8GB 16GB 8GB 12GB  8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  11000 MHz 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  10000 MHz 1700 MHz 1890 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 384-bit G6 352-bit G5X 256-bit G6 256-bit G6 256-bit G5X 3072-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 672GB/s 484 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 320 GB/s 653 GB/s 484 GB/s
TDP 250 W/
260 W (FE)
260 W 250 watts 215W
225W (FE)
230 W 180 watts 250W 292
Peak Compute (FP32) 13.4 TFLOPS / 14.2 TFLOP (FE) 16.3 TFLOPS 10.6 TFLOPS 10 TFLOPS / 10.6 TFLOPS (FE) 11.2 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 14.9 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS
Transistor Count 18.6 B 18.6B 12.0 B 13.6 B 13.6 B 7.2 B 21.0 B 12.5 B
Process Tech 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 14nm
MSRP (current) $1200 (FE)/
$1000
$6,300 $699 $800/
$700
$2,300 $549 $2,999 $499

 

As unusual as it is for them NVIDIA has decided to release both the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti at the same time, as the first products in the Turing family. 

The TU102-based RTX 2080 Ti features 4352 CUDA cores, while the TU104-based RTX 2080 features 2944, less than the GTX 1080 Ti. Also, these new RTX GPUs have moved to GDDR6 from the GDDR5X we found on the GTX 10-series.

DSC05175.JPG

Click here to continue reading our review of the RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti Availability Slips

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 16, 2018 - 11:18 AM |
Tagged: nvidia, rtx, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080

There are two changes to the launch of NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 20-series of cards. The first change is that the general availability, as in the first possible moment to purchase a GeForce RTX 2080 Ti without a pre-order, has slipped a week, from September 20th to September 27th. The second is that pre-orders of the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti have also slipped. They will ship between September 20th and September 27th, rather than all of them shipping on September 20th.

The GeForce RTX 2080 (without the Ti) will still launch on September 20th.

nvidia-geforce.png

This was all announced on the NVIDIA forums. The brief, ~six-sentence post did not clarify whether this applied to the OEMs, such as ASUS, EVGA, MSI, PNY, ZOTAC, and Gigabyte. It’s entirely possible that they are just referring to the Founder’s Edition. NVIDIA also did not mention why the delay occurred. Given the relatively short duration, it could be anything from one of the recent natural disasters to accidentally forgetting to add an automatic stop threshold to the pre-order page. Who knows?

The NVIDIA website has been updated to show “Notify Me” instead of “Pre-Order” for the GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, so pre-orders have officially shut down for that product. The regular RTX 2080 is still available for pre-order on NVIDIA’s website, though, so you still have a little time to pre-order those.

You can also, of course, wait for the reviews to make a more informed decision later.

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

A Look Back and Forward

Although NVIDIA's new GPU architecture, revealed previously as Turing, has been speculated about for what seems like an eternity at this point, we finally have our first look at exactly what NVIDIA is positioning as the future of gaming.

geforce-rtx-2080.png

Unfortunately, we can't talk about this card just yet, but we can talk about what powers it

First though, let's take a look at the journey to get here over the past 30 months or so.

Unveiled in early 2016, Pascal marked by the launch of the GTX 1070 and 1080 was NVIDIA's long-awaited 16nm successor to Maxwell. Constrained by the oft-delayed 16nm process node, Pascal refined the shader unit design original found in Maxwell, while lowering power consumption and increasing performance.

Next, in May 2017 came Volta, the next (and last) GPU architecture outlined in NVIDIA's public roadmaps since 2013. However, instead of the traditional launch with a new GeForce gaming card, Volta saw a different approach.

Click here to continue reading our analysis of NVIDIA's Turing Graphics Architecture

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Retesting the 2990WX

Earlier today, NVIDIA released version 399.24 of their GeForce drivers for Windows, citing Game Ready support for some newly released games including Shadow of the Tomb Raider, The Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 Blackout Beta, and Assetto Corsa Competizione early access. 

399-24-changelog.png

While this in and of itself is a normal event, we shortly started to get some tips from readers about an interesting bug fix found in NVIDIA's release notes for this specific driver revision.

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Specifically addressing performance differences between 16-core/32-thread processors and 32-core/64-thread processors, this patched issue immediately rang true of our experiences benchmarking the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX back in August, where we saw some games resulting in frames rates around 50% slower than the 16-core Threadripper 2950X. 

This particular patch note lead us to update out Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX test platform to this latest NVIDIA driver release and see if there were any noticeable changes in performance.

The full testbed configuration is listed below:

Test System Setup
CPU

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX

Motherboard ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme - BIOS 1304
Memory

16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4-3200

Operating at DDR4-2933

Storage Corsair Neutron XTi 480 SSD
Sound Card On-board
Graphics Card NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB
Graphics Drivers NVIDIA 398.26 and 399.24
Power Supply Corsair RM1000x
Operating System Windows 10 Pro x64 RS4 (17134.165)

Included at the end of this article are the full results from our entire suite of game benchmarks from our CPU testbed, but first, let's take a look at some of the games that provided particularly bad issues with the 2990WX previously.

The interesting data points for this testing are the 2990WX scores across both the driver revision we tested across every CPU, 398.26, as well as the results from the 1/4 core compatibility mode, and the Ryzen Threadripper 2950X. From the wording of the patch notes, we would expect gaming performance between the 16-core 2950X and the 32-core 2990WX to be very similar.

Grand Theft Auto V

gtav-new.png

GTA V was previously one of the worst offenders in our original 2990WX testing, with the frame rate almost halving compared to the 2950X.

However, with the newest GeForce driver update, we see this gap shrinking to around a 20% difference.

Continue reading our revised look at Threadripper 2990WX gaming performance!!

Board shorts, the GPU market shrinks a bit

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | September 7, 2018 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: jon peddie, gpu market share, amd, nvidia

Last week we had a peek at the overall GPU market, including APUs, and the news was not great.  This week Jon Peddie released details on the discrete GPU market, which also saw contractions.  When you look at this quarter versus last quarter, sales dropped by 28% and are down 5.7% from this time last year, similar to the trend we saw with the total market.  If you look back over time Q2 tends to be a bad quarter for GPU sales and the current market is actually larger in total volume than two years ago, before the mining craze was fully underway. 

You can see the details of AMD and NVIDIA's quarter below.

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The market shares for the desktop discrete GPU suppliers shifted in the quarter, Nvidia increased market share from last quarter, while AMD enjoyed an increase in share year-to-year."

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Tech Talk

 

Source: Jon Peddie

Graphics Cores Past and Present; looking back at AMD's recent GPUs

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 5, 2018 - 05:50 PM |
Tagged: amd, GCN, R9 290X, r9 390x, R9 Fury X, RX VEGA 64

[H]ard|OCP have been examining the generational performance differences between GPUs, starting with NVIDIA and moving onto AMD.  In this review they compare Hawaii GCN 1.1, Fiji GCN 1.3 and Vega10 GCN 1.5 on a wide variety of games.  AMD is a more interesting case as they have made more frequent changes to their architecture, while at the same time tending towards mid-range performance as opposed to aiming for the high end of performance and pricing.  This has led to interesting results, with certain GCN versions offering more compelling upgrade paths than others.  Take a close look to see how AMD's GPUs have changed over the past five years.

AMD-Radeon-RX-Vega-64-Specifications.jpg

"Wonder how much performance you are truly getting from GPU to GPU upgrade in games? We take GPUs from AMD and compare performance gained from 2013 to 2018. This is our AMD GPU Generational Performance Part 1 article focusing on the Radeon R9 290X, Radeon R9 390X, Radeon R9 Fury X, and Radeon RX Vega 64 in 14 games."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP