Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: AVerMedia

Overview

It's no secret that streaming video games on the internet is immensely popular now due to the rise of services dedicated to game streaming like Twitch and Mixer. A combination of commodity capture cards and software capture solutions have made it easier than ever to start streaming. 

 As internet speeds increase (at least in some parts of the world) combined with newly available capture hardware, it's only a matter of time before we start to see more of a push towards 4K streaming in the coming years.

However, until now, one of the biggest emerging trends in both console and PC gaming, HDR, has been ignored by capture gear.

Today, we're taking a look at two 4K HDR products from Avermedia, the Live Gamer 4K, and Live Gamers Ultra.

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Click here to continue reading our review of the Avermedia Live Gamer 4K and Live Gamer Ultra!

Podcast #520 - Threadripper Processors, BPX Pro SSDs, and more!

Subject: General Tech | November 1, 2018 - 02:46 PM |
Tagged: Threadripper, ssd, podcast, MyDigitalSSD, BPX Pro, 2970wx, 2920x

PC Perspective Podcast #520 - 11/01/18

Join us this week for discussion on the new Threadripper Processors, BPX Pro SSDs, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Jim Tanous, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano, and Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:26:22

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. Jeremy: Total Chaos - A spooky DOOM 2 mod for Halloween
 

Open the pod bay doors Google ...

Subject: General Tech | November 1, 2018 - 01:56 PM |
Tagged: google, security, iot, Home Hub

There is an undocumented web API in Google's Home Hub which is causing a bit of concern over at The Register and elsewhere.  This mysterious connection is available to anything on the same WiFi network as the Home Hub and it does not check for any authentication or tokens which means anyone connected to your WiFi can successfully connect and start to play with your settings.  Currently there is code which is capable of rebooting the device or to completely delete the current configured network, requiring you to rebuild it from scratch.  That could be very annoying if the delete command is coming from malware already inside the house, as it were. 

Hopefully there will be some basic authentication added ASAP, as that is a very blatant oversight.

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"A spokesperson for Google confirmed that any device, computer, or smartphone on the Wi-Fi network of a Home Hub can command the assistant as described above – that includes mischievous malware on a PC, for example."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

The West Virginian Wasteland is getting a bit crowded

Subject: General Tech | October 31, 2018 - 04:53 PM |
Tagged: gaming, fallout 76

Those with poor impulse control who still pre-order games will now be getting access to Fallout 76's beta, assuming the entire 47GB pre-loaded download did not self destruct on them.  Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN gave it a twirl, though with only a few people able to access the game it doesn't really represent what the final launch will look like.  Even so, expect to find yourself in a small crowd of people all performing the same initial tasks to solve the initial tasks, some with rather interesting handles.  On the plus side, the game itself looks quite pretty from the screenshots.

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"That sea of autumnal trees and distant storm clouds are lovely. Having winced at the wonky footage of the Xbox One beta last week I’m genuinely surprised at how pretty West Virginia is. Well, the bits of it that aren’t CocktimusPrime."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

Vega claims the new MacBook Pro

Subject: General Tech | October 31, 2018 - 04:33 PM |
Tagged: apple, amd, Vega

Among the various Apple announcements this week was a win for AMD, as Apple has renewed their agreement and will be using Radeon Pro Vega GPUs in it's soon to be released MacBook Pros.  We aren't expecting any more big surprises from the release, such as the iPad Pro now sporting USB C, the updated GPU may be the largest change this generation but it will be appreciated by some content creators.  You can read more about the various announcements over at The Inquirer.

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"AMD GPUs are nothing new in Mac machines, given the MacBook Pros have previously rocked the Radeon Pro 560X, but Cupertino is now bringing AMD's Vega-based GPUs to its expensive laptops."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Is Intel thinking of hooking up with TSMC again?

Subject: General Tech | October 30, 2018 - 03:05 PM |
Tagged: TSMC, Intel

It has been a while since Intel last used TSMC to fab some of their chips apart from some FPGA lines but rumours that DigiTimes have heard suggest that could change.  The current theory is that Intel may move Atom production, and possibly chipset fabrication as well, to an outside provider.  TSMC would be the only fab capable of switch production in a meaningful amount of time, leading to speculation their might be a deal in the works.  If TSMC is agreeable then theoretically Intel could use the freed production capability to increase production of Xeon and Core chips, which they currently desire as they are unable to meet demand. 

That's not the only rumour floating around today as we have seen hints of AMD's new RX 590 as well as reported issues from those who secured an RTX 2080 Ti.  More on those as they develop.

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"As its processor supply continues to fall short of demand, Intel reportedly has begun planning to outsource production for its entry-level Atom processors and some of its chipsets while keeping its high-margin Xeon and Core CPU production in-house, according to sources from the upstream supply chain."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

10nm is great, but so is $19.2 billion

Subject: General Tech | October 26, 2018 - 03:41 PM |
Tagged: quarterly earnings, Intel

Intel's earnings do not seem to have been hurt by their lack of 10nm processors nor the departure of Brian Krzanich, their revenue is up 19% from this time last year and represents the best quarter they have ever had.  Of that $19.2 billion in income, net income was $6.4 billion; no wonder they could afford to take Ryan away! 

The two stand out business units were the Intel Data Center Group and the relatively new IoT division, signifying their plan to prioritize data center products is fairly effective at producing profit.  The Register has more detailed breakdowns on the numbers here.

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"On a conference call for investors, Swan said, "This quarter was the best in our 50-year history," adding: "We expect 2018 to be the best year ever, and our third record year in a row."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

Samsung is the next to say they are launching a bendy phone

Subject: General Tech | October 25, 2018 - 12:28 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, foldable

You still shouldn't hold your breath, as we have seen announcements like this before, but it is possible Samsung will be showing off a foldable phone next month.  Even more ambitious is their announcement that they will also be developing a foldable laptop screen.  We have seen numerous other companies work on this before, but so far none have released a working model.  If they can pull it off there are numerous applications which could benefit from this technology; with current hybrid tablet/laptops becoming truly foldable and eReaders offering a much more paper-like feel.  The Inquirer has links to the rumours here.

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"While the South Korean tech giant is supposedly set to unveil a smartphone with a foldable display next month, the company is apparently going to push that tech to laptops, reported The Verge."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #519 - Core i9-9900K, Changes at PCPER, and more

Subject: General Tech | October 25, 2018 - 11:32 AM |
Tagged: turtle beach, seasonic, Samsung, podcast, Intel, Core i9-9900K, amd, 7nm

PC Perspective Podcast #519 - 10/25/18

Join us this week for discussion on the Core i9-9900K, Changes at PCPER, and more.

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Jim Tanous, Allyn Malventano, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg, Ryan Shrout

Program length: 1:48:01

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:42:20 Allyn: Something to watch - M.2 Optane 905P coming soon
  4. Closing/outro

Unite LA 2018: Unity Presents MegaCity Demo

Subject: General Tech | October 24, 2018 - 08:04 PM |
Tagged: Unity, pc gaming

Near the end of their keynote at the Unite LA conference, Unity showed off “MegaCity”. This scene, created by their internal Demo team, contains about 4.5 million rendered objects and plays at 60 FPS. About 5,000 moving vehicles are present in the environment as well. They also added 100,000 audio sources, because why not. Spoiler: They then pulled out a (high-end) phone and launched it there too.

This demo was designed to show off two things: Prefab Workflows and ECS.

The Prefab Workflows portion showed attendees, who are developers of Unity-based apps and games, how to cleanly maintain large scenes. The prefab editor allows components to be manipulated in isolation. Nesting allows that “isolation” to be tiered into a hierarchy. Variants allows the artist to override parts of prefabs to tweak without starting from scratch. The punchline is that the entire scene was made in about two months with just two artists.

The ECS side, on the other hand, showed that Unity’s new framework will soon make it a serious performance contender. The programming paradigm diverts from object-oriented principles, instead operating on combinations of lists of thin slices of data that, altogether, represent your system. This is good for CPUs because it allows linear memory access and massive parallelism, including vectorization, which keeps your processor at peak efficiency.

Note that, in terms of draw calls, the system does a lot of instancing to submit them to the GPU together, so this post isn't "Unity does millions of draw calls!" because that's not true. It's distinct objects in the scene that are indexed and sent to the driver in groups. That said, it's still a strong point that ECS is fast enough to effectively batch, LOD, and cull millions of objects into something the driver can handle; the GPU driver just got a lot of attention with Mantle, Vulkan, and DirectX 12. (And yes that's important too!)