The ASUS ROG Strix XG27VQ, 144Hz of FreeSync

Subject: Displays | October 13, 2017 - 01:40 PM |
Tagged: XG27VQ, ROG, freesync, Asus ROG Strix XG27VQ, asus

ASUS just announced the $350 ROG Strix XG27VQ, a 27" 1080p display with a 1800R curve, using a VA panel capable of a refresh rate up to 144Hz.  It is a Freesync display with an adaptive sync rate between 48-140Hz making it a great addition to a system using a Vega or other AMD GPU. 

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ASUS advertises a GtG response time of 4ms and a maximum brightness of 300 cd/m2, with HDMI v1.4, DisplayPort 1.2 and Dual-link DVI-D inputs.  They have continued to place Aura RGB behind the screen as well as projecting below the monitor stand, with several patterns you can choose from.  In addtion to using the OSD to manage profiles and settings you can install their DisplayWidget, to control features such as ASUS' GameVisual, App Sync, and Blue Light Filter.

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Full PR below the break.

Source: ASUS

ViewSonic Introduces a Trio of Monitors with Pro Color

Subject: Displays | September 28, 2017 - 11:25 AM |
Tagged: VP3881, VP3268-4K, VP2785-4K, viewsonic, usb type-c, ultrawide, UHD, ips, DCI-P3, Adobe RGB, 4k

ViewSonic has announced three new monitors in their VP series featuring factory-calibrated professional grade color, with the VP3881, VP2785-4K, and VP3268-4K.

The VP3881 features a 37.5-inch curved 21:9 aspect display with 3840x1600 resolution and HDR10 support.

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"Featuring a unique ergonomic design, ultra-wide 21:9 aspect ratio, and integrated speakers, the VP3881 delivers a panoramic viewing experience ideal for video editing, content development, high-end entertainment, and other color-critical applications."

The 27-inch VP2785-4K offers the most impressive color specs of the group, with 99% Adobe RGB and 96% DCI-P3 from its Ultra HD (3840x2160) panel.

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"This 27-inch 4K Ultra HD monitor delivers unmatched color accuracy for photographers, graphic designers, content developers, and other design pros and multimedia creatives. That means you get true images with vivid colors from real life, to camera, to screen. With USB 3.1 Type C, HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort, and Mini DisplayPort 2.1 connectivity options, the VP2785-4K can be used with a variety of external devices as well."

Finally we have the VP3268-4K, a 32-inch Ultra HD monitor with an IPS panel and minimal bezel design.

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"The newest member of the VP68 family, this monitor balances ultra-high definition and a large 32-inch display to deliver the ultimate in detail, clarity, and screen real estate – perfect for limitless creativity. With a SuperClear® IPS panel and 4-sided frameless design, this monitor provides a near-seamless viewing experience ideal for multi-display setups. It also includes HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort, Mini-DisplayPort, and USB hubs for flexible connectivity to a variety of computing devices and peripherals."

ViewSonic states that "all three of these VP series monitors are factory calibrated to deliver an amazing Delta E" of <2, making them ready for color-critical work out of the box. The monitors are available now, with list prices (USD) as follows:

  • VP3881: $1329.00
  • VP3268-4K: $989.00
  • VP2785-4K: $989.00
Source: ViewSonic

Asus XG27VQ; 27" of curved Freesync

Subject: Displays | September 22, 2017 - 05:25 PM |
Tagged: 27, freesync, Asus ROG Strix XG27VQ, asus, XG27VQ, 1080p, va lcd

To start with the particular specification which will upset some people, the ASUS XG37VQ is a 1080p monitor; so if life starts at 1440p then feel free to move on.  For those still reading, this Freesync monitor supports refresh rates from 48 to 144Hz and can display 95% sRGB coverage.  Techgage were impressed with the quality of the display but when it came to the RGBs present on the monitor they had some questions; the ROG logo that is projected from the bottom of the monitor only comes in red, while the glowing circle on the back of the display supports a full gamut of colours which no one will ever see.  Pop over for the full review.

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"Let's cut right to the chase. The Asus ROG Strix XG27VQ is a $350 gaming monitor, 27 inches in size, with a resolution of 1920 x 1080 and a refresh rate of 144 Hz. We're looking at a VA LCD panel here with FreeSync support, sporting an 1800R curvature."

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Source: Techspot

Philips Launching 49" 32:9 492P8 Ultra-wide Monitor Next Year

Subject: Displays | September 11, 2017 - 11:38 PM |
Tagged: va, ultrawide, productivity, philips, business, 32:9, 1080p gaming

Philips recently revealed a massive 49” ultra-wide monitor slated for release in the second half of next year. The so-called Philips 492P8 takes the bigger is better approach with its 32:9 aspect ratio ultra-wide monitor based on the same VA (vertical alignment) panel as Samsung’s more expensive (and feature-full) CH90 QLED. With a planned MSRP of $1,077, Philips has cut a few features in its model namely support for AMD’s FreeSync 2 and Samsung’s QLED backlighting. It Is not yet clear whether or not the monitor will retain the same 144Hz refresh rate and high dynamic range (HDR).

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The 49-inch diagonal monitor features a 3840 x 1080 resolution and a 1800R curvature. The 492P8 is rated at a maximum brightness of 600 cd/m2 and a contrast ratio of 5,000:1. The monitor is based on a VA panel which is a compromise between the fast response times and refresh rates of TN and the colors and viewing angles of IPS (and PLS) with strong contrast, good viewing angles, decent refresh rates (response times can be an issue in gaming as far as possible motion blur), and the ability to crank up the brightness. With the axing of FreeSync 2 support, this may not be the best option for gamers wanting an ultra-wide, but this monitor is sure to find a place in the corporate world with lots of side-by-side windows open in brightly lit office environments. Depending on reviews it could also be good for flight sims, 4X games, and other gaming as well.

The monitor features DisplayPort, HDMI, VGA, and USB Type-C display inputs (one each) as well as (using the USB Type-C port to connect to a PC) a two port USB 3.0 hub, one Ethernet jack, and two 3.5mm audio jacks (one headphone and one microphone).

The Philips 492P8 32:9 VA monitor is slated for a Q2 2018 release with a MSRP of $1,077 (C899). OF course, there is plenty of time for specifications and pricing to change between now and then, but it seems Philips is aiming for a budget option under $1100.

I would have liked to see more vertical resolution (I mean, why not at least 1200p? heh) but you can’t have everything, especially for cheap. What do you think about the 32:9 aspect ratio? Also, would you put a 49" ~34 pound monitor on your desk?

Also read: Samsung Announces FreeSync 2 HDR Displays, includes C49HG90 49-in UltraWide!

Source: PC Gamer
Author:
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: Acer

Acer Predator Z271T With Tobii Eye Tracking

It seems like it's never been a better time to be a PC gamer. With new technologies like VR, AR, HDR, adaptive sync, and high refresh rates being introduced or improved upon at a rapid pace, there's always something new and exciting right around the corner.

Today, we're taking a look at one new technology that promises to bridge the gap between traditional monitors and full-blown VR or AR setups: eye tracking. Originally developed for its use as an assistive device for users with disabilities, eye tracking is making a big jump to gaming, as it can both provide an additional method of control input as well as alter the way the user experiences the game.

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We first took a look at Tobii a few years ago with an early standalone eye tracking device. Now Tobii eye tracking is starting to make its way directly into monitors, and we spent some time with one such monitor: the Acer Predator Z271T.

Specs & Box Contents

The Acer Predator Z271T -- which I'll refer to as "Z27" going forward -- is a $700 27-inch monitor with a curved VA panel, 1920x1080 native resolution, and 144Hz refresh rate. The complete technical specifications:

  Acer Predator Z271T
Screen Size 27-inch
Curve Ratio 1800R
Response Time 4ms
Aspect Ratio 16:9
Backlight Technology LED
Panel Technology Vertical Alignment (VA)
Tilt Angle -5 to +25 degrees
Viewing Angle 178 degrees horizontal/vertical
Maximum Adjustable Height 4.72 inches
Video
Maximum Resolution 1920x1080
Standard Refresh Rate 144 Hz
Color Supported 16.7 Million
Contrast Ratio 3,000:1
Brightness 300 nits
Tearing Prevention Technology G-SYNC
Audio
Speakers 2 x 7W
Interfaces/Ports
DisplayPort Yes
HDMI Yes
3.5mm Audio Output Yes
USB 3.0 Yes (4-port hub)
Power Description
Operating Power Consumption 27 watts
Standby Power Consumption 500 mW
Off-Mode Power Consumption 400 mW
Physical Characteristics (with stand)
VESA Mount Compatible Yes (100mm x 100mm)
Height 20.4 inches
Width 24.4 inches
Depth 10.6 inches
Weight 16.76 pounds
Miscellaneous
Package Contents 1 x DisplayPort cable
1 x HDMI cable
1 x USB 3.0 Cable
Power cord

In terms of physical characteristics, the Z27 weighs in at 16.76lbs and is 20.4-inches high, 24.4-inches wide, and 10.6-inches deep when attached to its included stand. From the stand, the Z27 can tilt from -5 degrees to 25 degrees, and swivel up to 30 degrees side-to-side.

Continue reading to check out our impressions of both the current state of Tobii eye tracking tech, as well as how it works when implemented into a modern gaming display.

Just Picked Up: Samsung LS24F350 FreeSync Monitor

Subject: Displays | August 13, 2017 - 03:46 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, PLS

And, naturally, things break right when you make a big purchase. The day after I set up the Oculus, one of my monitors had a wobbly backlight and buzz, quickly going black-screen despite the on light showing it was connected. I revived it by turning it off and on again, but it was clear that it was dead. That said, I bought it back in ~2005-2006, so it lived a long life.

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Its replacement? A 24-inch mainstream Samsung PLS, 1080p display. It was surprisingly difficult finding a cheap (but solid) monitor that also had a wall mount, but this one was luckily $80-off at Staples ($169.96 CDN before taxes until August 15th). It was also compatible with FreeSync, but my GPUs are NVIDIA so it’s not a feature that I can comment on. It doesn't have a high refresh rate or anything, but it seems very good (for its price) so far.

One thing that I will note, however, is that you need to be careful with your wall mounts... there’s a stub for the stand that will not come off, and there’s not much room between it and the VESA mounts. Unless you have holes at pretty much the very bottom of your mount, which I luckily did, you will need to buy a new mount (or do some hacky thing with standoffs or whatever).

To blindly go where no monitor has gone before

Subject: Displays | July 31, 2017 - 03:58 PM |
Tagged: gsync, freesync

At recent AMD events, attendees were invited to try a blind sight test (an oxymoron if there ever was one) in which they had a chance to play on a AMD system with the new Vega GPU and Freesync as well as a machine powered by a GTX 1080 and G-Sync.  The two machines and monitors were concealed so you could not tell which was which.

Seeing as how many of us did not have a chance to attend these conferences nor see the difference between the two, [H]ard|OCP decided to replicate the experiment, albeit with a GTX 1080 Ti in the G-Sync system.  The two Windows 10 64-bit systems were powered by a AMD Ryzen 7 1800X CPU with 16GB of DDR4-2666MHz; the only difference was the GPU and display.   The two displays were capable of up to a 100Hz refresh rate and the display settings were matched as well as humanly possible.  The two monitors were a $720 ASUS MX34V with FreeSync and a $1300 ASUS PG348 G-Sync display, something worth noting for those with a shopping list.

Check out the video of the subjective experiences of the participants here, remembering that this is not exactly a rigid scientific experiment.

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"Totally unscientific and subjective testing is scorned by many, so if that gets your panties in a bunch, I suggest you stop reading. We had the opportunity to preview AMD's RX Vega this weekend, and we put it up against NVIDIA's GTX 1080 Ti, both using 100Hz FreeSync and G-Sync panels, with our testers representing 223 combined years of gaming experience."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Affordable luxury, Viewsonic's XG2703-GS display

Subject: Displays | July 10, 2017 - 02:25 PM |
Tagged: AHVA, ips display, viewsonic, XG2703-GS, 1440p, 165hz, g-sync

ViewSonic's 27" XG2703-GS display hits at least three of the four marks that high end users are looking for; it is 1440p, it does not have a curve and the maximum refresh rate is 165Hz.  The disagreement on the perfection of the display will come from those who prefer Freesync to G-SYNC, for this monitor only supports NVIDIA's adaptive sync technology. The panel is an Advanced Hyper-Viewing Angle (AHVA) IPS screen from AU Optronics, the standard for displays with a maximum refresh rate of 144Hz and higher.  Techspot ran this monitor though a few games to see what kind of performance you can expect on this display, check out their results here.

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"There is one type of monitor that ticks nearly every box for high quality PC gaming. One that provides a good mix of resolution and high refresh rate, while still being realistically usable on today's most popular gaming hardware. I'm talking about the latest 27-inch 1440p IPS monitors that hit a whopping 165 Hz with support for adaptive sync."

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Source: Techspot

Dell's 8k UP3218K display; good luck with the GPUs

Subject: Displays | June 14, 2017 - 03:06 PM |
Tagged: UP3218K, ultrasharp, dell, 8k

Ars Technica had the chance to test Dell's new $5000 UltraSharp UP3218K, a 32" 10-bit IPS panel with a resolution of 7680×4320.  It uses two DisplayPort 1.4 connections to drive this beast and as even the GTX 1080 Ti struggles with high graphics settings at 4k there are some performance problems.  Ars was able to test Rise of the Tomb Raider, Metro: Last Light, and GTA V and while they ran at 8K on a single GTX 1080 Ti; "they also crashed. A lot."  GTA V performed the best of the lot, reaching a high of 50FPS and a low of 15FPS, though they looked very pretty while doing so.  Drop by to download a screenshot and pan around to get a sense of what this screen can do.

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"While Acer's 4K, HDR-ready, 144Hz Predator X27 gaming monitor is pretty hot, Dell has something even better: the 8K Dell UltraSharp UP3218K (buy here). This, if you're unfamiliar, is a display that sports a whopping 7680×4320 pixels spread over a 32-inch 10-bit IPS panel."

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Source: Ars Technica

E3 2017: Alienware Announces 240 Hz Gaming Monitors: AW2518H (G-Sync) and AW2518HF (FreeSync)

Subject: Displays | June 12, 2017 - 07:01 PM |
Tagged: g-sync, free sync, dell, alienware, 240Hz

Also at the E3 event, Alienware launched a gaming monitor with two SKUs: one with G-Sync and one with FreeSync. Otherwise, these displays are apparently identical. They also apparently have lighting on the back, although it’s unclear whether this is RGB or locked to the Alienware shade of teal. (I’m guessing it’s Alienware teal.) At first, I was wondering why you would even want a light behind a display at all, but I guess it would make sense if it was very low power and you could leave it on while the rest of the display is off, giving a slight glow to an otherwise dark room.

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As for the specifications: both of these displays operate at 240 Hz, native, not overclocked. To achieve this rate, its panel is 24.5-inch, 1080p, and TN. The structure itself has a thin bezel on the top, left, and right side, although the bottom has a bit more thickness for the Alienware typeface logo and buttons. Despite being otherwise identical, the G-Sync model (AW2518H) has an MSRP of $699.99, while the FreeSync model (AW2518HF) is $200 cheaper at $499.99.

Both models launch on June 13th.

Source: Alienware