Thermaltake Launches Engine 17 Cooler for SFF Systems

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 26, 2018 - 03:12 AM |
Tagged: thermaltake, SFF, LGA 1151, lga 1150, Intel

Following the release of the Engine 27 two years ago, Thermaltake is taking another stab at the Sandia Labs and CoolChip Technologies inspired air bearing metallic fan heatsink with the tiny Engine 17 cooler which, at a mere 17mm tall, is suitable for even the smallest SFF systems. The Engine 17 CPU cooler is compatible with the newer Intel 115x sockets (LGA 1150, 1151, 1155, and 1156). Measuring 95.1mm x 95.1mm x 17mm, the heatsink features a round nickel plated copper base that contacts the CPU IHS. A metallic PWM fan (9 CFM) with 40 blades spins at at 1,500 to 2,500 RPM while a thin layer of air acts as both a bearing and a heat exchange layer. A ring of 119 angled stationary fins surround the fan and help with cooling.

Thermaltake Engine 17 SFF 1U Cooler.jpg

The Engine 17 cooler has a notably small footprint with the entire cooler staying well within the bounds of the socket mounting holes and barely covering the VRMs in Thermaltake's demo images. There is definitely no need to worry about RAM compatibility with this cooler. The downside, of course, is that the size limits the processors it can cool. Thermaltake claims that the smaller Engine 17 cooler can cool up to 35W TDP processors and while it may not win any temperature feats, it should at least be fairly quiet (it is rated at 11 to 23 dBA). It would enable a very thin SFF system with an AMD Ryzen 5 2400GE or Ryzen 3 2200GE or Intel Coffee Lake T-series e.g. i7-8700T) CPU. Such a system could be used as a quiet and discreet home theater PC or game streaming endpoint or (as Thermaltake is playing up) in a 1U server for low power servers and networking devices.

The Thermaltake Engine 17 will be available soon though exact dates and pricing are still to be determined. It will likely be a bit less than the larger $47 Engine 27 cooler though.

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Source: Thermaltake

Cause a Disco Inferno with CM's MasterLiquid ML240R RGB

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 22, 2018 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, ML240R RGB, MasterLiquid, AIO, watercooler

The Frag Harder Disco Lights are back, Cooler Master's ML240 RGB lets you have a party in your parts.  In the package you get 4 pin RGB extension cable, a 3 pin RGB extension cable, a 3-way 3 pin RGB splitter, four 3 pin and one 4 pin RGB connectors, which connect to the physical ARGB Controller.  The buttons give you total control over the speed and patterns of your RGBs, and you can use the ARGB Lighting Control Software to program your own preferred display.

Confusingly, the package [H]ard|OCP received also contained some sort of radiator, with a round plate connected by two hoses ... you can see what they did with those in this article.

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"Cooler Master's claim to fame with the ML240R RGB is, you guessed it, "THE MOST COLORFUL WAY TO COOL." Its Master Liquid series has recently gotten high praise from us when it comes to keeping your CPU cool using an All-In-One cooler. Cooler Master has taken its successful model and adorned it with lots of Frag Harder Disco Lights."

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CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Manufacturer: SilverStone

Introduction and Case Exterior

The SilverStone Redline Series RL07 offers a stylish exterior with an interesting front panel design and a tempered glass side panel, and the interior is all business with a typically open layout for what should be an easy build. The solid front panel and quiet 140 mm rear exhaust fan suggest low noise levels, but how cool does this case keep the components in our test setup? We will explore both the build process and performance in this review.

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"SilverStone’s Redline RL07 is a tower chassis with spectacular front panel design mated to a functional and practical internal structure. It has audacious, one of a kind asymmetrical styling that pays homage to earlier aggressive Redline series chassis launched in 2012 but elevates with details often only available on cases costing much more. On the inside, the RL07 has many modern features such as power supply / drive shroud, convenient tool-less drive trays, quick access dust filter and smart backside cable routing design. So it not only has highly flexible space for installing all popular core components, it also has incredible support for a myriad of cooling configurations. There are four total 120 / 140mm fan slots around the case with maximum radiator support of up to 360mm to meet the needs of PC enthusiasts of all levels."

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Specifications:

  • Material: Steel front panel, steel body, tempered glass side panel
  • Motherboard: ATX ( up to 12" x 11") , Micro-ATX
  • Expansion slots: 7
  • Drive bays: 3.5" x3 (compatible with 2.5"), 2.5" x3
  • Cooling system:
    • Front: 3x 120 / 140mm fan slot
    • Rear: 1x 120 / 140mm fan slot (1x 140mm exhaust PWM fan included)
  • Radiator support:
    • Front: 120mm x2, 240mm / 280mm / 360mm x1
    • Rear: 120mm / 140mm x1
  • Compatibility:
    • CPU cooler: Up to 167mm
    • Graphics card: Compatible up to 16.3" (415 mm) length, 6.57" (167 mm) width
    • Power supply: ATX, up to 190 mm length
  • Front I/O ports: USB 2.0 x2, USB 3.0 x2, 3.5 mm audio, mic
  • Dimensions (WxHxD): 226 x 488 x 465 mm (8.9 x 19.21 x 18.31 inches)
  • Weight: 8.2 kg

First Impressions

When viewed from the front the RL07 looks pretty conventional, with a solid front panel that is common to most mid-tower cases these days (other than the high-airflow models of course), punctuated by the red line down the middle that frames the split design when viewed off-angle.

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Continue reading our review of the SilverStone Redline Series RL07!

Computex 2018: Cooler Master Shows Off Prototype Thermoelectric (TEC) AIO Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 13, 2018 - 07:39 PM |
Tagged: thermoelectric, TEC, liquid cooling, cooler master, computex 2018, computex, AIO

In addition to cases and massive amounts of RGB Cooler Master had a prototype closed loop cooler on display at Computex that combines an all in one liquid cooling loop with a TEC element that cools the water to sub-ambient temperatures.

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TechPowerUp snapped photos from the show floor.

Thermoelectric coolers aren't anything new (and this isn't Cooler Master's first foray with TECs), but the hybrid approach is an interesting one. The AIO loop appears to work like a water chiller cooler would with the TEC not having direct contact with the processor but rather it is used to give the single 120mm liquid loop radiator a boost by pulling lots of heat out of the water before hitting the radiator. According to Computex attendees the loop order flows from the CPU block to the TEC element where water is passed across one side of the side and the other hot side is cooled by a large heatsink which uses four heatpipes and dual fin stacks along with two fans in a package about the size of a 240mm radiator. From there, the chilled water passes through a traditional water cooling radiator and then the cool water goes to the CPU block.

The thermoelectric cooler uses the Peltier effect where electricity (DC) is passed between an array of thermocouples that sit between two layers (usually ceramics) creating an effect where heat is drawn from one side to the other with the cool side able to be cooled below ambient temperatures while the hot side needs to be cooled by a heatsink to prevent it from overheating and reducing efficiency and/or damaging the materials.

According to PC World, Cooler Master has stated that their prototype TEC will be rated at 300W TDP which is quite a bit higher than the approximately 180W of a 240mm traditional AIO. Gordon Mah Ung was able to perform some cursory testing with a FLIR camera attached to his smartphone where he saw the cooler demonstrate its ability to cool the water used in the loop 10 to 15-degrees below ambient where it was around 80°F (~26.7°C) in the packed Computex show floor and 64 to 70°F for the water as measured by the FLIR when pointing at the radiator and tubing. Further, Cooler Master had a temperature probe at the CPU block where it measured 20°C (likely no heat load as no processor was hooked up heh). This boosted cooling performance does come with a tradeoff, however. The TEC's hot side will need to be cooled (noise) and the TEC itself will draw as much as 150W of power (it will use standard connectors that a PC PSU can drive) in order to work its cooling magic (so higher electricity usage/cost).

My first thought was that the hybrid cooler could prove useful in a SFF system by offering cooling potential that would just otherwise not be possible in the form factor with the thinking that the cooler would not need to cool to crazy low temperatures, but just enough to match the performance of a much larger water cooling loop. Gordon Mah Ung from PC World also posits that the cooler would be useful in situations where ambient temperatures are very high (say, summer months in the south with no or underpowered AC) as the TEC would be able to keep processor temperatures in check (allowing enthusiasts to maintain their overclock or at least keep stock clocks and Turbo Boost without thermal throttling) where air cooling or water cooling cannot as the best they can do is cool to ambient.

Apparently, the hybrid cooler will also be able to push things if you do want to go for higher overclocks for benchmarking runs or improved gaming performance.

One concern with thermoelectric and other sub-ambient cooling methods is condensation which can build up on the outside of cool parts like the tubing and blocks and can potentially cause instability or damage to PC components. Traditionally, the tubing and area around the CPU socket would need to be insulated to protect from this. Cooler Master's design, I don't think, is immune to this but by moving the TEC away from the processor and using it to cool the water (so no direct contact), it is allegedly much less of an issue and if the TEC is just used to provide a bit of a boost to the water loop rather than going for as low temperatures as possible the risk should be minimal.

There is no word on specific pricing or release dates, but several sites are reporting that it will be available later this year with "competitive pricing". I would guess this cooler is going to be at the high end of water cooling AIOs and expandable kits at minimum which is to say probably around $300+. (Looking on Amazon, EKWB kit with 360mm radiator is $370, you can find kits with 240mm radiators for between two-to-three hundred dollars, and a used custom loop starts around there if you find a forum deal.)

What do you think about this cooler? I am interested in seeing the reviews on this and whether it is able to combine the best of both water and TEC cooling worlds.

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Source: PC World

Corsairs that live in Crystal houses shouldn't throw rocks

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 12, 2018 - 06:19 PM |
Tagged: Crystal 280X, corsair, MicroATX, CUE

Recently announced at CES, the Corsair Crystal 280X RGB is up for review over at The Tech Report.  This microATX is wider than your average breadbox, 398x276x351mm (15.7x10.9x13.8") which gives you room for a 240mm rad and numerous 120/140mm fans on almost any side you desire, including the bottom.  Corsair CUE software will ensure all your RGBs blink in sync and with three tempered glass sides you will be able to see all of them.  Head on over for a better look at Corsair's newest case.

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"Corsair's Crystal Series 280X RGB is an unabashedly high-end microATX enclosure—a unicorn, in other words. We built up a high-end system worth of this enclosure and put the 280X RGB to the test to see if its performance can keep up with its striking looks."

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CASES & COOLING

Computex 2018: Noctua Teases Black Coolers and Fans For The Consumer Market

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 11, 2018 - 01:55 PM |
Tagged: noctua, air cooling, chromax, computex, computex 2018

While AMD’s reveal of its 32 core Threadripper 2 was quite surprising, Noctua may have had the most shocking news at this year’s Computex with the announcement of all black air coolers and fans for the consumer market Yes, you read that correctly; Noctua will be expanding its Chromax lineup to include alternative versions of its traditionally brown and beige air coolers clad almost completely in black with everything except the part of the block that contacts the processor IHS covered in a powder coat-esque finish (as noted by OC3D TV [video]).

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OC3D got hands on with the new coolers.

Apparently, the blacked out versions of Noctua coolers have the caveat of a slight performance hit versus the normal SKUs (likely due to the coating on the fins), but in exchange they will more easily blend in with the rest of your build. Noctua had all black versions of its NH-D15, NG-U12S, and the extremely low profile NHL9i cooler on display at its Computex booth.

As part of the Chromax series, the new coolers can be customized with bits of color accents by switching out pieces if you want as well including cables, rubber fan mounts, and fan shrouds in black, white, blue, green, yellow, and red colors.

Noctua Chromax Black Coolers HSF.jpg

PC Gamer (Maximum PC) also has some photos of the new coolers if you are curious.

The sleek new coolers which notably also lack any RGB LEDs will reportedly be available late this year or early next year with additional alternative black versions of other coolers to follow though these models will trail the release of the traditional Noctua style SKUs – which is to say that the newest coolers and fans will be available in brown and beige first. That’s okay though because I think the new black coolers are something that enthusiasts will be willing to wait for.

What are your thoughts on the new blacked out Chromax designs?

Source: OC3D TV

Computex 2018: AMD and Cooler Master Unveil Wraith Ripper Air Cooler For Threadripper Processors

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 8, 2018 - 11:39 AM |
Tagged: cooler master, amd, Threadripper, threadripper 2, Zen+, computex, computex 2018, tr4

In an interview with AMD Senior Vice President Jim Anderson, PC World's Gordon Mah Ung got the chance to discuss and get hands on with second generation Threadripper as well as AMD's new Wraith Ripper air cooler. Developed in partnership with Cooler Master, the Wraith Ripper is a massive air cooler capable of keeping even the upcoming 32 core Threadripper processor cool (allegedly a 250W TDP part!) which, as Jim Anderson notes, has all four dies on the package being used (first generation Threadripper used two hot dies and two spacers).

Cooler Master Wraithripper Threadripper Cooler.png

The behemoth features a full cover block for Threadripper that connects to a very dense aluminum fin stack using 14 nickel plated copper heatpipes. There is a single fan in the center of the fin stack hiding under a black fan shroud that covers the top and left and right sides. The black shroud also holds the customizable RGB lighting which lights up the logo and outline around the edges of the shroud. The fan is allegedly rated at 39 dBa which is pretty good considering the amount of heat it needs to dissipate from Threadripper CPUs. Likely due to the HSF's sheer size Cooler Master was able to go with a larger and slower spinning fan.

Other details like weight, cost, and release date are still unknown though it does appear to have some heft to it! It should be available later this year following the Q3 launch of second generation Threadripper though it will work fine with first generation Threadripper processors as well as they use the same TR4 socket.

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InWin gets artistic at Computex with the Z-Tower

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | June 6, 2018 - 05:24 PM |
Tagged: Z-Tower, InWin 307, InWin, computex 2018

Behold InWin's new flagship case, the Z-Tower, and stare in amazement at eight giant pieces of cast aluminium it is made from.

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If you look carefully at the picture from their product page below you can just make out what appears to be a PSU at the bottom as well as a motherboard mounted on the back, or possibly not ...  regardless the airflow in the case is certainly not restricted, assuming you can determine how to install the components.  This limited edition case will certainly make your system stand out, as we certainly haven't seen its like before.

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For the RGB addicts comes a simliarly impressive case, the 307, which bears a resemblance to the already available 303 chassis but with a big difference.  The front panel features an array of RGB LEDs which are connected to an audio sensor so that the lightshow can change in real time based on the music you are listening to.  If you prefer you can use the GLOW software to program your own animated featurette to display

To make it even more impressive and to boost your EGO you can add some of their new RGB fans.

 

 

Source: InWin

Seasonic shows off their new System Cable Management Device

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | June 6, 2018 - 02:53 PM |
Tagged: scmd, System Cable Management Device, seasonic, PSU, computex 2018, backplane

Seasonic have come up with a new cable management system which could replace the modular cabling that is the current choice for those who despise case clutter.

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As you can see above, with a compatible PSU you are able to connect directly to the Seasonic Backplane, aka the SCMD, with all of your power plugs distributed on the side of the device.  Simply connect the cabling you require, and leave out any you do not need.  It is thin enough to fit behind your motherboard, thus hiding almost all of your wiring and also ensuring you do not have to stretch that additional motherboard power cable. 

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Seasonic claims that introducing the SCMD into your power loop will only drop efficiency by 1% overall, making it a perfect alternative to modular cabling.  As with all things Computex this year, it does indeed sport an RGB logo, if you prefer to install it where it can contribute to the rave party in your case. We do not yet have a price or a date on which it becomes available, but Seasonic suggests it will come in three sizes to ensure a proper fit in almost any system.

 

Source: Seasonic

Computex 2018: CaseKing and Der8auer Debut Phase Shift Cooler AIO Prototype

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling | June 5, 2018 - 07:42 PM |
Tagged: phase change, overclocking, der8auer, computex 2018, computex, closed loop cooling

Famed overclocker Der8auer and Berlin-based online retailer CaseKing showed off a prototype phase change cooler at Computex 2018. The new cooler is a pressurized and closed system that places a block over the processor and uses a vertical tube to connect to a holding tank and a condenser that is cooled by a copper fin stack and two 90mm fans. While phase change cooling is nothing new, what is interesting about this prototype is that the team plans to bring what they call a Phase Shift Cooler to market as a commercial product like an AIO liquid cooler sometime before the end of the year.

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The system uses a 3M Novec-like fluid (it is not Novec, however, according to Gamer's Nexus in speaking with CaseKing at Computex) with a low boiling point. The system is pressurized, and the boiling point can be changed by adjusting the pressure of the cooling “loop”. As the processor heats up, the liquid begins boiling off and gas rises up the tube to the condenser where it cools and changes back into a liquid which then flows back into the CPU block with the help of gravity (which does limit placement of the condenser to vertical case orientations above the CPU. The copper fins of the condenser plate are cooled using two fans that do not need to spin at high RPMs.

Der8auer and CaseKing Phase Shift Cooler.jpg

According to Gamer’s Nexus, Der8auer and CaseKing plan to reduce the size of the cooler and hydralic tubing to make it more in line with a typical 240mm or 360mm AIO liquid cooler and it would be comparable in performance with them without the need for a pump and its associated noise, size, and risk of failure. The Phase Shift Cooler should also be quieter as well, with the planned cooler moving from 90mm to 120mm fans on the final product and the fans not needing to spin up as fast as those high-pressure fans used with water cooling radiators. I have to say that it is an interesting proposition and I am looking forward to more information on this cooler as it progresses!

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