Manufacturer: BitFenix

Introduction and First Impressions

A large mid-tower design featuring tempered glass side panels and a mix of aluminum and steel exterior construction, the RGB-imbued Shogun is every bit what you would expect a ‘flagship’ enclosure from BitFenix to be. So did it get our seal of approval? Read on to find out!

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The BitFenix Shogun appears at first glance to be a full-tower enclosure, but it is actually using a form-factor that BitFenix calls “super mid-tower”, and it has the seven expansion slots of a mid-tower design. It supports E-ATX motherboards on down, and has some interesting features to help set it apart in a highly competitive enclosure market.

The Shogun’s compatibility with ASUS Aura motherboard lighting effects makes it a good option for the RGB lighting inclined, and there are some nice exterior touches such as the sculpted top and bottom aluminum panels and (of course) those tempered glass sides. The Shogun competes in the premium space, but is still palatable at $149 for what is on the surface a pretty impressive-looking package.

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The open interior and glass side panel invite impressive builds (Image credit: BitFenix)

Continue reading our review of the BitFenix Shogun Super Mid-Tower Enclosure!

Author:
Manufacturer: Corsair

Introduction and Features

Introduction

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(Courtesy of Corsair)

Corsair recently updated their HX Series power supplies which now include four models: the HX750, HX850, HX1000 and HX1200. The HX Series is targeted towards advanced users for use in gaming rigs, overclocking systems, and any PC that demands rock-solid stability. Corsair states the HX Series power supplies provide extremely tight voltage regulation, quiet operation, Platinum-level efficiency and come with a fully modular cable set. In addition, the HX Series power supplies are built with all Japanese 105°C capacitors and come backed by a 10-year warranty.

Note: Corsair offers essentially the same four models in their HXi Series, which also includes the Corsair Link digital interface for software based monitoring and control.

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We will be taking a detailed look at the new HX Series 850W power supply in this review.

Corsair HX Series PSU Key Features:

•    750W, 850W, 1000W, and 1200W models
•    Max power output at server-grade 50°C temperature rating
•    80 Plus Platinum efficiency certification
•    10-Year warranty
•    ZeroRPM mode for fan-less operation at low loads
•    Quiet 135mm cooling fan with FDB
•    All capacitors are Japanese brand, 105°C rated
•    Fully modular cable set
•    Switch allows selecting either Single or Multiple Rail +12V outputs
•    Complies with ATX12V v2.4 and EPS 2.92 standards
•    6th Generation Intel Core processor Ready
•    Full suite of protection circuits: OVP, UVP, SCP, OPP and OTP
•    Active PFC with full range AC input (100-240 VAC)
•    MSRP for the HX850 is $159.99 USD
•    MSRP for the HX850i with Corsair Link is $199.99 USD

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Another advanced feature incorporated into all HX Series power supplies is a little switch on the front panel that allows selecting either Single or Multiple +12V rail outputs.

Please continue reading our review of the Corsair HX850 PSU!!!

I Think They're Big Fans of AMD Threadripper and EPYC... Noctua Announces Three New Coolers.

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 3, 2017 - 08:41 PM |
Tagged: noctua, amd, Threadripper, EPYC

Noctua has announced three new heatsinks for AMD’s new high-end CPU platforms, Threadripper and EPYC. If you’ve been following the company, or Morry’s motherboard reviews, then you know that these coolers are huge (and effective).

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Apparently the main difference is the contact surface, 70mm x 56mm, to accommodate for the processor’s large package. AMD connects multiple dies together with their Infinity Fabric, which means a huge total surface area. The cooler comes in three sizes, corresponding to the fan that’s intended to be used with it: 140mm (NH-U14S TR4-SP3), 120mm (NH-U12S TR4-SP3), and 92mm (NH-U9S TR4-SP3).

The two “smallest” sizes, NH-U12S and NH-U9S, are both expected to retail for $69.90 USD, so I guess choose whichever makes the most sense for your system. The largest one, the NH-U14S, is $10 more expensive at $79.90 USD. They should be available by the end of the month.

Source: Noctua

FSP releases a trio of Platinum PSUs

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 2, 2017 - 01:30 PM |
Tagged: FSP Group, modular psu, 750w, 650W, 550W, Hydro PTM, 80 Plus Platinum

FSP Group have just released three new 80 Plus Platinum Hydro PTM modular PSUs, in 750W, 650W and 550W models.  The Hydro branding comes from the fluid dynamic bearings in the 135mm fan which they have optimized for quiet operation.

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The 750W model has a pair of 4+4 power plugs for X299 users, the other two models will not though all will use ribbon cables to help you with cable management.  Internally you will find Japanese industrial grade electrolytic caps and a single 12V rail which will provide higher quality power than multiple rail designs.   All models will come with a 10 year warranty.

PR below the fold.

Source: FSP Group

NZXT Kraken X62, X52 and X61 compatible with AMD Ryzen Threadripper

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 31, 2017 - 01:49 PM |
Tagged: nzxt, kraken, Kraken X62, Kraken X52, Kraken X61, Threadripper, amd

NZXT has announced that their three popular AiO watercoolers, the Kraken X62, Kraken X52, and Kraken X61 will be compatible with Threadripper, arriving soon to retailers.   

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NZXT has been working with AMD and created an adapter for SocketTR4 to allow you to use their cooler in your new system.  The retention clip will be supplied by AMD, in the package the new CPUs.  This is a good thing, considering the unique new way in which you install Threadripper processors.  If you haven't seen the video demonstrating the installation process you can see it below.

 

Source: NZXT

Build your own watercooling loop with the EKWB L360 2.0 Kit

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 24, 2017 - 02:34 PM |
Tagged: watercooler, EKWB, EK-KIT

EKWB's L360 2.0 Kit is a ~$250 pre-compiled watercooling kit which includes a EK-Supremacy MX waterblock, EK-CoolStream PE 360mm radiator with three EK-Vardar F3-120mm fans, EK-XRES 100 DDC MX 3.1 PWM pump and reservoir, 2m of tubing plus compression fittings and a container of EK-Ekoolant EVO Clear coolant concentrate, good for 1l of coolant once diluted. All you need to do is assemble the kit and install it in your system.  Modders-Inc did just that, the installation process was enjoyable and far more effective than air cooling.  If you did plan to add in a GPU waterblock EKWB recommends adding in another radiator which should make your cooling even more effective. 

Check out the full review here.

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"EKWB has been in watercooling since its meager beginnings in 1999. Every package, every kit, every block advancing the genre of watercooling. As the critical mass for watercooling began to grow, and the knowledge barrier for putting these kits into your system began to fall, companies have been putting together pre-compiled kits of components to make it easier on the …"

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Source: Modders Inc

CRYORIG's A40; two heads are better than one?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 21, 2017 - 03:49 PM |
Tagged: CRYORIG, CRYORIG A40, AIO, water cooler

The CRYORIG A40 is not a new cooler but its unique design is worth revisiting for those who have forgotten about its existence.  Instead of having a single area in which to dump heat, the pump assembly mounted to the CPU also has its own fan.  That fan did not not noticeably decrease the CPU temperatures when TechPowerUp tested it, however for SFF systems and other builds with components which could benefit from airflow inside the case that fan is more than just a gimmick.  Check out the full review here.

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"The A40 by CRYORIG is the company's entry level offering in their all-in-one hybrid liquid CPU cooler lineup. It lacks the size of the A80 and the radiator thickness of the A40 Ultimate. However, unlike the others, it offers a more affordable price point with all the same features."

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Source: TechPowerUp

Thermaltake's $25 Contac Silent 12 heatsink for Ryzen

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 14, 2017 - 03:15 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Contac Silent 12, ryzen, AM4, amd, heatsink, air cooler

Thermaltake has a new cooler for those planning a Ryzen build on a budget, or for quiet system builds.  The Contac Silent 12 is a mere 153x12x100.3mm in size, with the fan attached, and weighs a paltry 700g however it is capable of almost matching the performance of AMD's Wraith cooler while operating at a noticeably quieter level.  In addition to the heatsink you will find a 'low-noise cable' which changes the fans RPM span from 500-1500 RPM to 400-1100 RPM however in their tests The Tech Report found it had little effect on the noise produced by a system under load.  See the full results here.

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"Thermaltake's Contac Silent 12 relies on an established design and a simple mounting system to get AMD Socket AM4 builders up and running as quickly as possible. We tested this cooler at stock and overclocked speeds to see how it stacks up for just $25."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

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MSI gets into the CPU heatsink business big time, the Core Frozr XL

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 5, 2017 - 03:38 PM |
Tagged: ryzen, msi, Core Frozr XL

The MSI Core Frozr XL is not the first CPU heatsink to come out of that company but it is the largest, 150.4x170.0x129.8mm in size and a hair short of 2kg with the included fans.  The fancy plastic shrouds over the fans also act as the mounting point for the fans and can be adjusted to provide a little more clearance for tall DIMMs though it is still going to be a tight squeeze.  As the cooler is designed for AMD's new Ryzen chips, as well as some legacy chips, Neoseeker tested it against AMD's Wraith cooler and the AiO Ryzen cooler.  The MSI heatsink did much better at load, however when the system was idle the bundled coolers were a little better; though how often is your system on and idling anyways? 

Check out this RGBeast here.

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"The totally massive MSI Core Frozr XL benefits from a large nickel-plated copper thermal plate to quickly pull the heat away from the CPU. The heat then transfers from the thermal baseplate into the eight 6mm SuperPipes, which move the heat upward to the large aluminum dissipation fin array that can dissipate up to 250W of heat. Lastly, the two MSI 120mm Torx fans push-pull the heat away from all of that thermal mass and out of the computer case."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

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Source: Neoseeker

Gamers Nexus Talks Mining with AIB and PSU Vendors

Subject: Graphics Cards, Cases and Cooling | July 5, 2017 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: supply shortage, shortage, ethereum, cryptocurrency

The cryptocurrency craze is kind-of like the old gold rush. Tokens are just out there waiting to be discovered, and value is applied when people trade it in exchange for goods and services. In this case, these tokens are discovered by doing math, and faster computers acquire more, and the algorithm is quite parallel. Some of the non-Bitcoin currencies are gaining traction, and becoming economically viable to mind with off-the-shelf parts, so gaming parts are being sold out... and not to gamers.

What do the video card add-in board (AIB) partners (as in the companies that take GPUs from NVIDIA and AMD and attach them to things that will actually plug into a motherboard) think of this? Gamers Nexus reached out to a bunch of them and, off the record, got a bunch of responses. The fifteen-minute video is quite interesting, and covers a lot of issues like brand loyalty, the second-hand market flooding, and RMA abuse. It even talks about the abnormal stress the GPU mining could have on power supplies. Most of the responses make sense, but it’s interesting to hear it coming from people in the industry, even if “who specifically said what” has been anonymized.

Of course, this is for the best, because you'll get more candid responses that way.