Fus ro dah with a little help from your friends

Subject: General Tech | January 16, 2019 - 01:31 PM |
Tagged: skyrim, multiplayer, mod, gaming

Originally scheduled to be available a year or so back, the team developing a multiplayer mod for Skyrim are almost ready to release a closed beta.  You can see from the video posted over at Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN that they have indeed managed to play together using their mod, as well as being compatible with a number of other mods as no one plays vanilla Skyrim anymore.  There are still some bugs to work out, as evidenced in the video and it lacks some of the tricks of Elder Scrolls Online.  On the other hand it doesn't have a lot of the negatives of that game either. 

There is no release day yet, but keep your eyes open for more news as well as where to grab it, as Steam has declined to host it via their Workshop.

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"A Skyrim multiplayer mod is about to enter closed beta, and will soon offer you and up to seven friends the chance to explore the snowy bit of Tamriel together. The devs say the closed beta won’t last long, and an open one will be hot on its heels."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Look ma, no keyboard!

Subject: General Tech | January 16, 2019 - 12:34 PM |
Tagged: DIY, dual screen, nifty

Anitomicals C is a inventive computer enthusiast who has built his own version of Microsoft's large PixelSense workspace (once called Surface); a dual touchscreen desktop machine.  It looks like a laptop in that it folds closed but packs desktop components, with graphics handled by a proper GTX 1080 and with a server PSU hidden inside.  At 10kg (22lbs) it is a bit heavy to carry around daily but certainly portable. He has designed it in such a way that input peripherals are superfluous, for those who do not need them or cannot use them.

Check out the quick overview at Hackaday and click through to the build video if you are so inclined.

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"He freely admits that it is a prototype and proof of concept, and that is obvious from its large size and extensive use of desktop components. But he has brought it together in a very tidy Perspex case serving as an interesting class in creating a portable computer with well-chosen desktop components, even though with no battery it does not pretend to fit the same niche as a laptop."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hackaday

Let us see how you handle my Threadripper's new NUMA Dissociater attack!

Subject: General Tech | January 15, 2019 - 02:57 PM |
Tagged: amd, NUMA, Threadripper, numa dissociator, coreprio

With Threadripper, AMD introduced something new and different to the market, a HEDT architecture with nonuniform memory access.  This has met with mixed results, as is reasonable to expect from such a different chip design.  There has not been much out of Redmond to adapt Windows to handle this new design compared to the amount of work coming out of the enthusiast community, especially those using Linux.

Phoronix has recently benchmarked a piece of software from CorePrio called NUMA Dissociater on both Windows and Linux.  It was designed to better address some performance issues on the Threadripper 2990WX and 2970WX than AMD's Dynamic Local Mode which can be enabled if you run their Ryzen Master software.  As you can see in the full review the results are not earth shattering, nor do they always increase performance, but the foundation for improvement is fairly solid. 

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"Here are some benchmarks of Windows 10 against Linux while trying out CorePrio's NUMA Dissociater mode to see how much it helps the performance compared to Ubuntu Linux. Additionally, tests are included of Windows Server 2019 to see if that server edition of Windows is able to offer better performance on this AMD HEDT NUMA platform."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Source: Phoronix

It's simply the rest ... that Ars saw at CES

Subject: General Tech | January 15, 2019 - 12:43 PM |
Tagged: ces 2019, Lenovo, Samsung, LG, dell

Ars Technica takes you through an eclectic mix of devices which caught their eyes at CES, not necessarily award winners nor groundbreaking tech but at least somewhat eye catching.  For instance, Lenovo's smart alarm clock below with a 4" screen at 800x400. Powered by a 1.5GHz MediaTek 8167S SoC and a PowerVR GE8300 GPU with 1GB of RAM and 8GB of storage it has a significant amount of processing power, and one hopes security to stop someone from disabling your snooze button! 

There are also laptops, TVs in both OLED and MicroLED as well as a new Vive, all of which you can see here.

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"CES 2019 has finally come to an end—and by and large, it was a more interesting show than last year's. To that end, the Ars reviews staff has put together another annual Best in Show list, and this group of products we consider particularly interesting."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Ars Technica

GeForce Driver 417.71 Now Available, Enables G-SYNC Compatibility With FreeSync Monitors

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 15, 2019 - 03:25 AM |
Tagged: variable refresh rate, nvidia, graphics driver, gpu, geforce, g-sync compatibility, g-sync, freesync

One of NVIDIA's biggest and most surprising CES announcements was the introduction of support for "G-SYNC Compatible Monitors," allowing the company's G-SYNC-capable Pascal and Turing-based graphics cards to work with FreeSync and other non-G-SYNC variable refresh rate displays. NVIDIA is initially certifying 12 FreeSync monitors but will allow users of any VRR display to manually enable G-SYNC and determine for themselves if the quality of the experience is acceptable.

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Those eager to try the feature can now do so via NVIDIA's latest driver, version 417.71, which is rolling out worldwide right now. As of the date of this article's publication, users in the United States who visit NVIDIA's driver download page are still seeing the previous driver (417.35), but direct download links are already up and running.

The current list of FreeSync monitors that are certified by NVIDIA:

Users with a certified G-SYNC compatible monitor will have G-SYNC automatically enabled via the NVIDIA Control Panel when the driver is updated and the display is connected, the same process as connecting an official G-SYNC display. Those with a variable refresh rate display that is not certified must manually open the NVIDIA Control Panel and enable G-SYNC.

NVIDIA notes, however, that enabling the feature on displays that don't meet the company's performance capabilities may lead to a range of issues, from blurring and stuttering to flickering and blanking. The good news is that the type and severity of the issues will vary by display, so users can determine for themselves if the potential problems are acceptable.

Update: Users over at the NVIDIA subreddit have created a public Google Sheet to track their reports and experiences with various FreeSync monitors. Check it out to see how others are faring with your preferred monitor.

Update 2: Our friends over at Wccftech have published a short video demonstrating how to enable G-SYNC on non-G-SYNC VRR monitors:

Source: NVIDIA

G.SKILL Announces Trident Z RGB DDR4-3466 32GB for X399

Subject: Memory | January 14, 2019 - 02:51 PM |
Tagged: G.Skill, ddr4-3466, X399, Threadripper, amd, RGB, TZRX

Threadripper's architecture loves high frequency RAM, though it can be a bit picky at times and you will have a far better experience sticking with vaildated RAM ... though you certainly don't have to.

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G.Skill have just announced a 32GB kit of four DDR4-3466 modules, with timings of 18-22-22-42 and plenty of RGBs.  On the Threadripper 2950X system they used as an example, the DIMMs were perfectly happy running at the default of 1.3V.   They will be available relatively soon and you will be able to spot them thanks to the TZRX branding they will sport.

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Source: G.Skill

Slow light, testing ray tracing performance with Port Royal

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 14, 2019 - 02:23 PM |
Tagged: 3dmark, port royal, ray tracing

3D Mark recently released an inexpensive update to their benchmarking suite to let you test your ray tracing performance; you can grab Port Royal for a few dollars from Steam.  As there has been limited time to use the benchmark as well as a small sample of GPUs which can properly run it, it has not yet made it into most benchmarking suites.  Bjorn3D took the time to install it on a decent system and tested the performance of the Titan and the five RTX cards available on the market. 

As you can see, it is quite the punishing test, not even NVIDIA's flagship card can maintain 60fps.

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"3DMark is finally updated with its newest benchmark designed specifically to test real time ray tracing performance. The benchmark we are looking at today is Port Royal, it is the first really good repeatable benchmark I have seen available that tests new real time ray tracing features."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Source: Bjorn3D

AMD's Scott Herkelman on CES, Radeon VII and NVIDIA

Subject: General Tech | January 14, 2019 - 01:04 PM |
Tagged: Scott Herkelman, radeon vii, amd

[H]ard|OCP had a chance to talk with Scott Herkelman, the man with a plan from AMD, about the new generation of GPUs which were teased at CES.  Among other things, they confirmed that the card shown at CES with the triple fan design will match the card AMD will be selling directly as well as the requirement for a pair of 8pin PCIe power connectors.  The cards will natively support HDMI 2.0, with 2.1 possible in the future with an active adapter. 

You can read more in the entire interview, including his reaction to Jen-Hsun's comments about the new card and NVIDIA's reluctant compatibility with Adaptive Sync.

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"We had the opportunity to talk to Scott Herkelman at AMD about the new Radeon VII GPU at CES 2019, and he was kind enough to answer questions that we had. We get his thoughts on the new Radeon VII, its full specifications and die size, FreeSync, multi-GPU, 16GB of HBM2, AMD getting back into direct retail sales of video cards, and more."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: [H]ard|OCP

CES 2019: Wacom Launches Cintiq 16 (Not Pro) Pen Display

Subject: General Tech, Displays, Shows and Expos | January 13, 2019 - 07:34 PM |
Tagged: CES, ces 2019, wacom, wacom 16

Wacom has launched a new, lower-cost Cintiq pen display at last week’s Consumer Electronics Show. This one is the Wacom Cintiq 16, which should not be confused with the previously-released Wacom Cintiq Pro 16. While the Pro had a 4K screen with 94% AdobeRGB, the new model downgrades to 1080p with 72% NTSC. Both are based on IPS panel technology.

(Note the different AdobeRGB vs NTSC color spaces. It’s hard to compare the two, but 72% NTSC roughly corresponds to 100% sRGB, which is smaller than 94% AdobeRGB… so the Pro should have better colors… but it’s just about impossible to exactly quantify the difference without calibrating both panels to both color spaces and comparing.)

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In exchange for the one-quarter resolution (albeit on a 16-inch screen) and lower color space, you get a much smaller price tag. The Wacom Cintiq Pro 16 is listed at $1499.95 USD on the Wacom website, but the new Wacom Cintiq 16 is listed at just $649.95 USD. This price cut opens it up to users with a much different budget. It’s not quite in the “video game console” territory, but it’s not significantly higher than that $500 threshold either. It’s possible that you could see it barely squeeze into holiday gifts for teenagers and young adults that show a strong interest in art. It also makes it much easier to justify for small business art studios, too.

The Wacom Cintiq 16 is expected to ship this month (January 2019) for $649.95.

Source: Wacom

Awesome Games Done Quick 2019 Sets New Personal Best

Subject: General Tech | January 13, 2019 - 05:40 PM |
Tagged: speedrun, gdq, charity, agdq

The latest Games Done Quick marathon wrapped up at around 1 o’clock (EST) last night as the reverse boss order run of Super Metroid killed the poor, harmless animals. The runner took the detour to the “Save the Animals” room, opened the door, then fired a few times through it without entering… just to troll. I can appreciate that (despite donating to save the animals -- after the other incentives were met, of course).

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A few minutes later was the closing ceremony. Organizers thanked the staff, volunteers, and partners, and then added revenue from Twitch subs and bits, $217,226.12 USD, to the donation tracker. This brought the overall total to $2,394,423 USD, which is more than any other Games Done Quick event; the next highest was last year’s AGDQ at $2,295,191 USD. As usual, donations are still being accepted even though the stream has ended. It is currently sitting at $2,397,767.51 USD from 46377 donors, which benefits the Prevent Cancer Foundation.

The next Games Done Quick is Summer Games Done Quick (SGDQ) 2019, which starts on June 23rd, 2019 in Bloomington, Minnesota. Next year’s Awesome Games Done Quick 2020, despite just moving to Maryland this year, will move again for its 10th anniversary… to Orlando, Florida.

If you don’t want to wait until the summer, then a different organization, the European Speedrunner Assembly (ESA), are holding their Winter 2019 event starting on February 18th.

PC Perspective Podcast #528 - RTX 2060, EVGA Nu Audio, and our CES Roundup

Subject: General Tech | January 12, 2019 - 12:02 PM |
Tagged: video, sound card, ryzen 3, RTX 2060, radeon vii, podcast, evga, ces 2019

PC Perspective Podcast #528 - 1/11/2019

We're a little bit delayed this week due to CES, but we're back in action and ready to talk about the GeForce RTX 2060 review, some new Corsair gaming mice, AMD's big Ryzen and Radeon announcements, an awesome new sound card from EVGA, G-SYNC compatibility with FreeSync monitors, and more!

Subscribe to the PC Perspective Podcast

Check out previous podcast episodes: http://pcper.com/podcast

Today's Podcast Hosts
Sebastian Peak
Josh Walrath
Jim Tanous

Show Topics
00:00:35 - Review: GeForce RTX 2060
00:16:35 - Review: New Corsair Gaming Mice & Slipstream
00:21:20 - News: AMD CES Announcements
00:38:38 - News: AMD 2019 GPU Refresh
00:42:31 - News: GeForce RTX Mobile
00:49:21 - News: ASUS TUF AMD Gaming Laptops
00:52:50 - News: EVGA Nu Audio Sound Card
01:00:43 - News: Killer E3000 2.5Gbps NIC
01:10:26 - News: ASUS ProArt 1,000-Zone Backlight Display
01:16:04 - News: HyperX Cloud Orbit S & QuadCast
01:25:01 - News: Phison PCIe Gen4 NVMe Controller
01:28:52 - News: be quiet! White Cases & Slim CPU Coolers
01:32:33 - News: NVIDIA G-SYNC Compatible Displays
01:42:24 - Picks of the Week
01:49:04 - Outro

Picks of the Week
Josh - Acer Predator X34 Ultrawide Monitor
Jim - DockCase Adapter for MacBook Pro
Sebastian - Star Trek: Phase II

AMD Supplies First Radeon VII Benchmarks

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 12, 2019 - 08:17 AM |
Tagged: vega 64, Vega, RX VEGA 64, radeon vii, gpu, benchmarks, amd, 7nm

After announcing the Radeon VII this week at CES, AMD has quietly released its own internal benchmarks showing how the upcoming card potentially compares to the Radeon RX Vega 64, AMD's current flagship desktop GPU released in August 2017.

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The internal benchmarks, compiled by AMD Performance Labs earlier this month, were released as a footnote in AMD's official Radeon VII press release and first noticed by HardOCP. AMD tested 25 games and 4 media creation applications, with the Radeon VII averaging around a 29 percent improvement in games and 36 percent improvement in professional apps.

AMD's test platform for its gaming Radeon VII benchmarks was an Intel Core i7-7700K with 16GB of DDR4 memory clocked at 3000MHz running Windows 10 with AMD Driver version 18.50. CPU frequencies and exact Windows 10 version were not disclosed. AMD states that all games were run at "4K max settings" with reported frame rate results based on the average of three separate runs each.

For games, the Radeon VII benchmarks show a wide performance delta compared to RX Vega 64, from as little as 7.5 percent in Hitman 2 to as much as 68.4 percent for Fallout 76. Below is a chart created by PC Perspective from AMD's data of the frame rate results from all 25 games.

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In terms of media creation applications, AMD changed its testing platform to the Ryzen 7 2700X, also paired with 16GB of DDR4 at 3000MHz. Again, exact processor frequencies and other details were not disclosed. The results reveal between a 27% and 62% improvement:

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It is important to reiterate that the data presented in the above charts is from AMD's own internal testing, and should therefore be viewed skeptically until third party Radeon VII benchmarks are available. However, these benchmarks do provide an interesting first look at potential Radeon VII performance compared to its predecessor.

Radeon VII is scheduled to launch February 7, 2019 with an MSRP of $699. In addition to the reference design showcased at CES, AMD has confirmed that third party Radeon VII boards will be available from the company's GPU partners.

Source: AMD

AMD Promises Full Radeon GPU Lineup Refresh in 2019

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 11, 2019 - 04:35 PM |
Tagged: video cards, Vega VII, Vega, Refresh, radeon, Mark Papermaster, graphics, gpus, cto, amd, 7nm

AMD CTO Mark Papermaster spoke with The Street in a video interview published yesterday, where he made it clear that we can indeed expect a new Radeon lineup this year. “It’s like what we do every year,” he said, “we’ll round out the whole roadmap”.

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Part of this refresh has already been announced, of course, as Papermaster noted, “we’re really excited to start on the high end” (speaking about the Radeon VII) and he concluded with the promise that “you’ll see the announcements over the course of the year as we refresh across our Radeon roadmap”. It was not mentioned if the refreshed lineup will include 7 nm parts derived from the Vega VII shown at CES, but it seems reasonable to assume that we haven’t seen the last of Vega 2 in 2019.

Source: The Street

Mixcder E8 headset, no wires, no noise, no worries

Subject: General Tech | January 11, 2019 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: audio, mixder, mixder e8, active noise cancellation, wireless headset

The Mixcder E8 offers Bluetooth 4 connectivity using the SBC codec, active noise cancellation and a $70 price tag.  It doesn't offer support for other codecs, nor does it provide more than stereo playback, which does seem reasonable for the price point.  It does use standard 40mm neodymium drivers and offers 32 Ω impedance, with a battery which will offer 16 hours or more of playback.

TechPowerUp tested them and found them to be about what you should expect from a wireless ANS headset at this price, with one small caveat.  The headphones offer a wired mode for extended use, however doing so disables the microphone.

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"The Mixcder E8 is a pair of wireless, over-ear headphones with active noise cancelling, and a price that's much lower than you'd expect after going over the list of features. Just about everyone is after a pair of wireless headphones nowadays; here's something worth considering if you're on a tight budget."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: TechPowerUp

These three foundries aren't scared of a wee 7nm

Subject: General Tech | January 11, 2019 - 01:14 PM |
Tagged: amd, 7nm, CoWoS, TSMC, SPIL, TFME

DigiTimes today is sharing some information about just where AMD's 7nm chips will be processed and there seems to be a name missing.  TSMC, SPIL and TFME will all be producing specific products but there is no mention of GLOBALFOUNDRIES in the news post.

TSMC will handle the bulk of the EPYC and HPC versions of Vega production with their chip-on-wafer-on-substrate, as one might expect; SPIL and TFME will handle desktop Ryzen and GPUs.  One hopes that by diversifying their production sources we can avoid shortages from one line effecting the entire market as we have seen in the past. 

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"TSMC is also among the backend partners of AMD for its new 7nm computing and graphics products, according to industry sources. Siliconware Precision Industries (SPIL) under Taiwan's ASE Technology Holding, and China-based Tongfu Microelectronics (TFME) are other backend service providers for the chips, the sources continued."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Phison Previews PCIe Gen4 x4 NVMe with PS5016-E16 Controller

Subject: Storage | January 11, 2019 - 09:36 AM |
Tagged: ssd controller, ssd, solid state drive, PS5016-E16, phison, PCIe Gen4, PCI Express 4.0, NVMe

One of the areas that can see an immediate impact from PCI Express Gen 4 which will first arrive with AMD’s upcoming Ryzen desktop processors is storage, and to that end Phison is not waiting around to show just what we can expect from the first generation of PCIe Gen4 SSDs.

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Phison PS5016-E16 performance slide (image credit: ComputerBase)

The company’s PS5016-E16 controller was on display at CES in a prototype device, and is powered by a quad-core solution combining two ARM cores with a pair of proprietary CO-X processor cores from Phison. Basic specs from Phison include:

  • PCIe Gen4 x4 NVMe
  • 8 Channels with 32 CEs
  • NAND interface: 800 MT/s support
  • DDR4 interface: 1600 Mb/s support
  • 3D TLC and QLC support
  • Designed with Phison’s 4th Gen LDPC Engine

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Phison PS5016-E16 prototype device (image credit: Legit Reviews)

As to performance, Phison lists sequentials of 4000 MB/s reads and 4100 MB/s writes, while providing a graphic showing CrystalDiskMark results slightly exceeding these numbers. How can Phison exceed the potential of PCIe Gen3 x4 with this early demo? As reported by Legit Reviews Phison is using a Gen4HOST add-in card from PLDA, which “uses a PCIe 3.0 x16 (upstream) to PCIe 4.0 x8 (downstream) integration backplane for development and validation of PCIe 4.0 endpoints”.

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Phison PS5016-E16 demo system in action (image credit: Legit Reviews)

The Phison PCIe Gen4 x4 NVMe controller is expected to hit the consumer market by Q3 2019.

Source: ComputerBase

CES 2019: HyperX QuadCast Microphone & Cloud Orbit S Headset

Subject: General Tech | January 10, 2019 - 10:56 PM |
Tagged: RGB, microphone, hyperx, headset, gaming mouse, gaming headset, ddr4, ces 2019, CES

HyperX is here at CES demoing several new products — including a new product category — as well as some updates to their existing product line. The highlights include the company's first microphone and a new premium gaming headset made with Audeze's planar magnetic drivers.

Check out the complete launch details below as well as our impressions from our visit to the HyperX suite at CES.

HyperX Pulsefire Raid Gaming Mouse

The HyperX Pulsefire Raid RGB mouse is designed for gamers who need additional buttons for key binding or to execute a variety of commands. HyperX Pulsefire Raid features 11 programmable buttons and is designed with a Pixart 3389 sensor for accuracy and speed with settings up to 16,000 DPI. Customizable native DPI settings allow gamers to monitor settings with an LED indicator. In addition, the mouse includes Omron switches with 20M click reliability. Pulsefire Raid is designed for accurate, fluid and responsive tracking, without acceleration. Using HyperX NGenuity software, gamers can assign personalized macro functions to the 11 programmable keys and store them in a macro library.

hyperx-pulsefire-raid.jpg

Our impressions: The Pulsefire Raid Gaming Mouse doesn't do anything new in terms of basic design, but its 11 programmable buttons are more than found on many competing gaming mice and will be appreciated by competitive gamers looking to map as many in-game functions as possible.

The wired mouse feels good in the hand and includes nice RGB effects that can by configured via software or turned off if desired. The Pulsefire Raid includes the normal range of higher-quality components — Omron switches and a 16,000 DPI Pixart 3389 sensor — at a competitive price point of about $60. Recent purchasers of mid-range and higher gaming mice probably won't be tempted to switch, but if you're looking for a new gaming mouse or craving those additional programmable buttons, the HyperX Pulsefire Raid will be a nice choice at it expected price point when it launches in Q2.

HyperX QuadCast Microphone

The HyperX Quadcast is a standalone microphone designed to meet the exacting demands of PC, PlayStation 4, and Mac professional or aspiring streamers. The QuadCast features an anti-vibration shock mount, an easily-accessible gain control adjustment, four selectable polar patterns, and tap-to-mute functionality with convenient LED lighting to indicate broadcast status. With crystal clear voice capturing, Quadcast connects streamers to their viewers like never before.

hyperx-quadcast.jpg

Our impressions: While we couldn't fully test the QuadCast's audio capabilities in a noisy CES demo suite, what we could hear sounded promising. Users have a choice of polar patterns, quick gain control via a dial on the bottom, a 3.5mm headphone output for live monitoring, and a tap-to-mute feature that indicates the mute status by turning off the microphone’s red light.

The QuadCast's stand is sturdy with a functional and attractive built-in shock mount. But it also comes with an adapter for mounting it to another microphone stand or arm. The QuadCast will be priced at $139 when it launches in Q2.

HyperX Cloud Orbit and Cloud Orbit S Headset

The Cloud Orbit and Cloud Orbit S gaming headsets are the first HyperX gaming headsets powered by Audeze’s patented 100mm Planar Magnetic Drivers for accurate sound. Waves Nx® 3D audio technology brings an immersive cinematic audio experience to gaming. The Cloud Orbit S includes Waves Nx® head tracking technology to deliver a stable hyper-realistic 360-degree audio environment where the user’s head movements bring the room to life 1,000 times a second. HyperX gaming headsets paired with Audeze and Waves technology bring audio quality to the next level with audio technology previously found only in audiophile headsets.

hyperx-cloud-orbit-s.jpg

Our impressions: HyperX is no stranger to gaming headsets, but the new Cloud Orbit series is their first project in collaboration with high-end audio company Audeze. The Cloud Orbit and Cloud Orbit S feature Audeze's planar magnetic drivers in a headset that eschews the common more "aggressive" gamer design for a subtle yet attractive black and gray look.

In addition to high quality sound from the planar magnetic drivers, the higher-end Cloud Orbit S features Waves NX 3D audio processing that can optionally position the user's audio sources via head tracking. When enabled, the current audio output is "placed" in a static position. When the user then turns their head, the headset uses head-tracking technology to pan the audio accordingly. In other words, the Waves Nx processing is simulating what it would sound like if you were sitting in a theater with multi-channel surround sound speakers and then turn your head to the side or behind.

We had a chance to demo Waves Nx on the Cloud Orbit S and the effect is quite realistic and impressive. But while it makes a great demo, we're not sure how many users would find a feature like this useful in the long-run since many users would prefer to have their audio "follow them" regardless of head positioning. However, we're hoping to get a chance to try it out more in a quieter environment.

Set to arrive in Q2, the Cloud Orbit S with head tracking will set you back $329 while the non-tracking Cloud Orbit will land at $299.

HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB Memory

The HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB is now available in 16GB modules in speeds of 3000MHz and 3200MHz as individual modules and kits of 2 and 4 up to 64GB. Predator DDR4 RGB features synchronized RGB lighting with HyperX Infrared Sync technology, allowing multiple modules to sync LED lighting and produce an exceptional color and pattern display. Powered directly from the motherboard, this patented technology provides an enhanced visual experience of RGB memory for gaming, overclocking PCs and DIY system builds.

hyperx-predator-rgb-ram.jpg

Our impressions: HyperX launched its Predator DDR4 RGB memory — which uses infrared light to sync RGB effects between modules — last year, but only in single-module capacities of up to 8GB. This of course limited the amount of memory users could install in their system, especially on desktop motherboards/chipsets which only feature two or four DIMM slots.

Now HyperX is adding a 16GB module to the product lineup, doubling the maximum amount of RAM that users of this product can fit into their builds. The new capacity will be available later this month starting at $167.

Source: HyperX

Looking at Chromebooks now that we know Ryzen will soon be an option?

Subject: Mobile | January 10, 2019 - 03:50 PM |
Tagged: Chromebook, guide

During AMD's CES keynote they mentioned that their new Ryzen chips will be appearing in some models of Chromebook, which might create some new interest in these mobile devices.  Ars Technica recently published an in depth guide walking you through the important features to look for if you are shopping for a Chromebook.  They also offer quick overviews of the best models currently available, if you weren't going to wait for the new ones to be released.

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"All of those factors, plus the recent introduction of Android apps into the ecosystem, have made Chromebooks popular with younger users, teachers, and anyone who works and plays primarily within the confines of the Chrome Web browser."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

More Mobile Articles

Source: Ars Technica

Mushkin's CES extravaganza

Subject: Storage | January 10, 2019 - 02:16 PM |
Tagged: Mushkin, ces 2019, carbon x100, Source 2, carbon z100, helix-l, pilot-e, M.2, thunderbolt

Mushkin launched a number of new storage products at CES and they passed on a bit of information on them for you to peruse.

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Pilot-E - M.2 2280 PCIe SSD
Featuring Silicon Motions SM2262EN Controller and Mushkin’s M.E.D.S. the Pilot-E brings high performance with low power consumption to Mushkin’s 2019 product line-up. Offering PCIe x4 NVMe 1.3, twice the capacity*, and 30%* more performance of its previous generation.

  • Built-in LDPC ECC provides the most-powerful data correction level in use today
  • End-to-end data path protection
  • Data shaping means greater endurance
  • StaticDataRefresh ensures data integrity
  • Global wear-leveling evens program/erase counts across data blocks to extend lifespan

HELIX-L_4.jpg

Helix-L - M.2 2280 PCIe SSD
Equipped with the Silicon Motion SM2263XT and cutting-edge 96-layer micron 3D TLC NAND your computer will have the power and responsiveness to help your productivity soar. Experience amazing gaming performance, seamlessly edit and share 360 video, and enjoy fantastic 4K Ultra HD entertainment– all with the lightning fast data transfers.

You will benefit from the same security and longevity as with the Pilot-E series.

SOURCE_2_2.PNG

Source 2 – 2.5” SATA III SSD
Designed using Silicon Motion's SM2259 controller and 96-layer 3D TLC NAND, the Source 2 holds nothing back.

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Carbon X100 – External USB 3.1 Gen2 SSD
The Carbon X100 will transform the way you game and streamlines storage intensive workflows. Get stunning sequential read/write speeds of 1,000/1,000 MB/s, up to 500% faster writes than a standard USB 3.0 flash drive.  Compatible with PC and Mac right out-of-the-box, also XBOX and PS4 Compatible, Type-C to Type-A cable included.

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Carbon Z100 – External Thunderbolt SSD
Equipped with Thunderbolt 3 and an all-aluminum enclosure, the Carbon Z100 with Thunderbolt 3 is perfect for the vital high-performance photo and video editing applications your work requires.

New Line of AMD Ryzen compatible OC Memory Modules.
There is also a new series of Mushkin Redline DIMM kits specifically for that new Ryzen chip you are eyeing.

Source:

Rounding up CES

Subject: General Tech | January 10, 2019 - 12:37 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, Intel, ces 2019, amd

The Tech Report just posted a nice assortment of updates covering their travels at CES, including their take AMD's new GPU and processors.  They also took a look at Intel's offerings, and not just the fresh splash of seemingly bottomless Coffee, this time without the picture drawn on the top.  What was far more interesting were the lineup of 10nm chips announced, Lakefield for low power applications, Ice Lake mainstream chips and Snow Ridge, an SoC designed for network applications.  Of course, it wouldn't be an Intel briefing without Optane, to which the H10 series was announced, which sports both QLC 3D NAND and 3D XPoint on a M.2 2280 gumstick.  It has a controller for both types of memory which means the bulk of the heavy lifting will be done onboard and not pushed onto your CPU. 

 

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"That title probably rests on the shoulders of four upcoming Intel products based on the company's beleaguered 10-nm fabrication process: the Lakefield low-power client processors, the Snow Ridge network SoC, and Ice Lake chips for every market segment."

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