NVIDIA rides shotgun in autonomous vehicles

Subject: General Tech | August 9, 2017 - 12:43 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, autonomous vehicles, HPC

NVIDIA has previously shown their interest in providing the brains for autonomous vehicles, their Xavier chip is scheduled for release some time towards the end of the year.  They are continuing their efforts to break into this market by investing in start ups in a program called GPU Ventures.  Today DigiTimes reports that NVIDIA purchased a stake in a Chinese company called Tusimple which is developing autonomous trucks.  The transportation of goods may not be as interesting to the average consumer as self driving cars but the market could be more lucrative; there are a lot of trucks on the roads of the world and they are unlikely to be replaced any time soon.

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"Tusimple, a Beijing-based startup focused on developing autonomous trucks, has disclosed that Nvidia will make a strategic investment to take a 3% stake in the company. Nvidia's investment is part of a a Series B financing round, Tusimple indicated."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Valve Announces Artifact Game with Three Somethings

Subject: General Tech | August 8, 2017 - 10:16 PM |
Tagged: valve, pc gaming

During their The International tournament for Dota 2, Valve announced a whole new game and a whole new reason for Blizzard to be annoyed at them: Artifact. While the teaser doesn’t really say much, they allowed Sean Plott, better known as Day[9], discuss his experiences playing it.

Apparently, it’s a card combat game that is based on the Dota 2 universe. Borrowing from the MOBA formula, there are actually three boards, which he called lanes at one point, that you will need to balance your efforts between. Some strategies can push a single board, while others can just safely lean on all three (although I’m not sure whether the metagame will heavily favor one or the other... in practice).

It’s unclear whether Valve will use their own engine, or license a third-party engine like Unity, which was used by Blizzard for Hearthstone and Valve, themselves, for some of their VR content.

Artifact is expected at some time in 2018.

Go big or go home, LaCie's 96TB 12big NAS

Subject: Storage | August 8, 2017 - 05:57 PM |
Tagged: thunderbolt 3, NAS, LaCie, big12, 96TB

The big12 NAS device from LaCie comes in 48TB, 72TB, 96TB and 120TB varieties, all having a dozen 3.5" bays for your drives.  The device stands 447x161x237mm which is somewhat larger than the Ruler drive Intel just announced and is 17.6kg fully loaded.  It will connect via Thunderbolt 3 and supports RAID 0/1/6/10/50/60.  Just because it is loaded with HDDs doesn't mean it is a slowpoke, KitGuru measure speeds of 2287MB/s for RAID 0 and 2231MB/s for RAID 5, impressive by any means.  The price is also impressively high, however the speed and quality of the RAID software installed in the device makes it desirable for those who need a serious storage solution.

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"LaCie’s 12big is the current flagship of the company’s professional range of external drives and if you are in the market for huge amounts of capacity and very, very fast data transfer rates then the 12big might be just the thing you are looking for…..but beware, you will need deep pockets – the 96Tb version we review today costs close to £8,300."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: Kitguru

FMS 2017: Samsung Announces QLC V-NAND, 16TB NGSFF SSD, Z-SSD V2, Key Value

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | August 8, 2017 - 05:37 PM |
Tagged: z-ssd, vnand, V-NAND, Samsung, QLC, FMS 2017, 64-Layer, 3d, 32TB, 1Tbit

As is typically the case for Flash Memory Summit, the Samsung keynote was chock full of goodies:

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Samsung kicked off by stating there are a good 5 years of revisions left in store for their V-NAND line, each with a corresponding increase in speed and capacity.

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While V-NAND V4 was 64-layer TLC, V5 is a move to QLC, bringing per die capacity to 1Tbit (128 GB per die).

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If you were to stack 32 of these new V5 dies per package, and do so in a large enough 2.5" housing, that brings the maximum capacity of such a device to a whopping 128TB!

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Samsung also discussed a V2 of their Z-NAND, moving from SLC to MLC while only adding 2-3 us of latency per request. Z-NAND is basically a quicker version of NAND flash designed to compete with 3D XPoint.

170808-121123.jpg

M.2 SSDs started life with the working title of NGFF. Fed up with the limitations of this client-intended form factor for the enterprise, Samsung is pushing a slightly larger NGSFF form factor that supports higher capacities per device. Samsung claimed a PM983 NGSFF SSD will hold 16TB, a 1U chassis full of the same 576TB, and a 2U chassis pushing that figure to 1.15PB.

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Last up is 'Key Value'. This approach allows the flash to be accessed more directly by the application layer, enabling more efficient use of the flash and therefore higher overall performance.

There were more points brought up that we will be covering later on, but for now here is the full press release that went out during the keynote: (after the break)

We can't benchmark Threadripper yet, but we can cool it

Subject: Processors | August 8, 2017 - 03:01 PM |
Tagged: amd, Threadripper, water cooling, lapping

It has been a long time since lapping was a requirement to get the best cooling for your new processor, however it might be making a comeback.  Threadripper is endowed with a larger heatsink than your average CPU and to help you accommodate that the chip contains an Asetek mounting bracket which is compatible with most AiO coolers.  The bracket and size of the heatspreader do seem to exacerbate any curvature of the coldplate however, the Asetek AiO which [H]ard|OCP tested needed to be lapped for a proper mating.

Since they had some difficulty with AiO coolers, [H] decided to configure their own watercooler for Threadripper.  They grabbed an old Koolance water block they had handy and with a bit of time and a $10 trip to a hardware store they ended up with a much better solution.  Take peek at the process, especially if you happen to have parts lying around that you want to put back to use. 

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"What do you do when you don't have the proper parts that you need to water cool your new thread ripper? Make you own with trash you find around the house. Maybe even repurpose and old water block that is in your closet."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

One drive to rule them. Intel's new look for petabyte drives

Subject: General Tech | August 8, 2017 - 01:11 PM |
Tagged: Intel, ssd, petabyte, sata, M.2, ruler, Optane

Intel is increasing the storage density of SSDs with a brand new form factor which gets rid of the empty space that takes up the majority of a 2.5" SSD.  The new ruler format will fit up to a petabyte in a volume small enough to fit in a 1U rack space.  This is significantly smaller than the volume it would currently occupy in a server rack, and helps reduce the number of connections required.  If you used the the current 60TB monster from Seagate, you would still need 17 of the 3.5" drives to hit a single petabyte; not something which will fit into a single 1U rack.  The Inquirer wasn't given a launch date nor a price but we can assume this drive will not meet Ryan's approved price per gigabyte.

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"Although new formats are emerging all the time, this one seems particularly timely, coming as it does at a time when we have far exceeded the need for an SSD to take up even a standard 2.5-inch space, most of which is air."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer

Intel to Reveal 8th-Generation Core Processor Lineup on August 21

Subject: Processors | August 8, 2017 - 12:04 PM |
Tagged: processor, Intel, cpu, Core, coffee lake, 8th generation core

Intel has announced a live event on August 21 to reveal the new 8th-generation Core processor family. The Facebook Live stream will be available on both Intel's Facebook page or simply by visiting the Intel Newsroom, and it begins at 8:00 PDT (11:00 EDT) on 8/21.

8th-gen-2x1.jpg

What exactly is being discussed? Intel provides these bullet points for the event which is to take place just before the upcoming national solar eclipse:

  • Don’t be caught in the dark. Learn how the 8th Gen Intel Core processor family will offer blazing fast performance.
  • Hear directly from Gregory Bryant, senior vice president of the Client Computing Group at Intel, and others about the details on the latest processor family and what it can help you do.
  • Discover how immersive experiences will bring you from spectator to participant with 8th Gen Intel Core processor capabilities.
  • Don’t just take our word for it. See the power of 8th Gen Intel Core technology come to life in the hands of a VR creator and imaging technologist.
  • Get a sneak peek at some of the amazing system designs based on 8th Gen Intel Core processors.
  • Start planning for what new 8th Gen Intel Core processor-based device to purchase in the holiday season and even before.
  • Don’t worry, you won’t miss the solar eclipse. Tune in before it descends upon Oregon and the West Coast and then makes its way across the U.S.
  • See how the 8th Gen Intel Core processor is designed for today and what comes next.

We will cover the event which will provide official details on the rumored Coffee Lake CPU lineup. Stay tuned!

Source: Intel

FMS 2017: Micron Launches 9200 Series Enterprise Lineup with 3D TLC NAND, x8 PCIe

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | August 8, 2017 - 12:02 PM |
Tagged: U.2, pcie, NVMe, micron, HHHL, FMS 2017, 9200, 3d nand

We were extremely impressed with the Micron 9100 Enterprise SSDs. They are still the fastest NAND flash SSDs we've tested to date, but they were built on planar NAND, and we know everyone is replacing their flat flash with more cost efficient 3D NAND. Same goes for the 9200:

9200_PCIe_family.jpg

Highlights for the new models are IMFT 3D NAND running in TLC mode and a new controller capable of PCIe 3.0 x8 (HHHL form factor only - U.2 is only a x4 interface). Here are the detailed specs:

specs.png

Improvements for the x4 models are marginal upgrades over the 9100, but the x8 variants bump up the maximum performance to 900,000 IOPS and 5.5GB/s! These should be shipping by the end of the month, and we will review them as they come in.

Press blast after the break

Intel Fills In the Gaps on Core X-Series Processor Specs

Subject: Processors | August 7, 2017 - 01:34 PM |
Tagged: X-Series, processor, Intel, cpu, Core i9, core i7

Intel launched the first half of its X-Series processor lineup earlier this year, releasing up to the 10-core i9-7900X. But with the upcoming release of AMD's 16-core Threadripper 1950X, the real interest among enthusiasts are the specs of Intel's high core count X-Series parts.

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After previously teasing partial specs for these parts, Intel today finally unveiled the complete details, starting out with the i9-7920X (12 cores/24 threads) with a 2.9GHz base and up to 4.4GHz boost clock and topping out with the i9-7980XE (18 cores/36 threads) with a 2.6GHz base and 4.4GHz max boost clock. Check the table below for the complete specifications:

  i9-7980XE i9-7960X i9-7940X i9-7920X i9-7900X  i7-7820X i7-7800X TR 1950X TR 1920X TR 1900X
Architecture Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Zen Zen Zen
Process Tech 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm 14nm 14nm
Cores/Threads 18/36 16/32 14/28 12/24 10/20 8/16 6/12 16/32 12/24 8/16
Base Clock 2.6 GHz 2.8 GHz 3.1 GHz 2.9 GHz 3.3 GHz 3.6 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.4 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.8 GHz
Turbo Boost 2.0 4.2 GHz 4.2 GHz 4.3 GHz 4.3 GHz 4.3 GHz 4.3 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz
Turbo Boost Max 3.0 4.4 GHz 4.4 GHz 4.4 GHz 4.4 GHz 4.5 GHz 4.5 GHz N/A N/A N/A N/A
Cache 24.75MB 22 MB 19.25MB 16.5MB 13.75MB 11MB 8.25MB 40MB 38MB ?
Memory Support DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666 Quad Channel DDR4-2666 Quad Channel
PCIe Lanes 44 44 44 44 44 28 28 64 64 64
TDP 165 watts 165 watts 165 watts 140 watts 140 watts 140 watts 140 watts 180 watts 180 watts 180 watts?
Socket 2066 2066 2066 2066 2066 2066 2066 TR4 TR4 TR4
Price $1999 $1699 $1399 $1199 $999 $599 $389 $999 $799 $549

From a pure core-count perspective, the Threadripper 1950X goes up against Intel's i9-7960X, but with a $700 difference in price. With Intel CPUs holding and IPC advantage over AMD, however, it's likely that the i9-7920X, and perhaps even the 7900X, will best Threadripper in certain gaming and productivity workloads.

Also interesting in Intel's announcement today are the base clocks of the 12-core i9-7920X (2.9GHz) and the 14-core i9-7940X (3.1GHz). Intel pushed the TDP of the 7940X to 165W, allowing it to increase the base clock over its 12-core counterpart. This suggests that Intel expects the 14-core 7940X, at a price-point of $1399, to be a popular choice in terms of price-to-performance.

Finally, Intel's release today reveals that all of the upcoming X-Series parts will have 44 PCIe lanes, compared to the 64 lanes AMD is offering on all Threadripper parts. There was some debate in the office this morning about how Intel's 44 lanes should cover most configurations for the foreseeable future, but this still remains one clear advantage for AMD's platform.

Intel's 4- to 10-core processors are already on the market. Intel says that the 12-core 7920X will launch August 28th, while the 14- to 18-core parts will launch about a month later, on September 25th.

Source: Intel

AMD Will Sell Wraith Max CPU Cooler Separately

Subject: Memory | August 6, 2017 - 11:41 AM |
Tagged: wraith max, Wraith, ryzen, fm2, amd, AM4

Amidst all the big AMD announcements recently, the company quietly revealed that it would begin selling the Wraith Max CPU cooler separately at retail. The Wraith Max heatsink and fan was previously only available in OEM systems and in boxed SKUs of the highest end Ryzen processors (mainly the 1700X and 1800X). The cooler is a refreshed and upgraded version of the company’s original Wraith cooler that measures 105 x 105 x 85mm and features a boxy horizontal cooler with a copper baseplate and heatpipes with a shrouded 92mm fan along with a RGB LED ring around the fan that can be controlled via motherboard software.

AMD Wraith Max CPU Cooler.png

The Wraith Max is rated at 140W TDP and is connected to the system using a fan header and USB (for controlling the lighting). AMD further rates the cooler at a fairly quiet 38 dBA. The Wraith Max supports all of the usual AMD sockets including AM4, AM3, and FM2 (no Threadripper support of course heh), but there is no official support for Intel sockets.

The Wraith Max cooler will retail for $59 USD. I have been keeping an eye on the usual online retailers and have not yet seen it listed, but it should be available soon. Hopefully there will be more reviews of the cooler now that it is a retail product on its own, and maybe we can get Sebastian to take a look at it and compare it to the original Wraith cooler (and his usual lineup of course) he reviewed last year.

Source: AMD

Razer Patches Two Security Vulnerabilities

Subject: General Tech | August 5, 2017 - 11:20 PM |
Tagged: razer

Back in July, a security research group, SecureState, published two vulnerabilities after privately disclosing them to Razer back in March and April. The first vulnerability could lead to a blue-screen of death for the affected machine, although it would need to be triggered by another applications running on the machine. Forcing a blue-screen could be intimidating, but there would be plenty of other things that a malicious application could do if it was able to do that.

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The second issue was more concerning, though. This one allowed, again, another application running on the machine to gain NT_AUTHORITY\SYSTEM privileges. For instance, a user could think that they’re installing a mod for a game, and their computer is completely owned. At the time, Razer did not publish an update, so the company recommended uninstalling Razer Synapse.

Now, as of August 1st, according to Tom’s Hardware, Razer has pushed the update. If you uninstalled Razer Synapse, it’s once again safe. You know, as safe as any other device driver.

The International 2017 (TI 7) Starts on Monday

Subject: General Tech | August 5, 2017 - 09:17 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, valve, DOTA 2

Valve’s biggest DOTA 2 tournament, The International, is set to begin on Monday. While the initial prize pool was set at $1.6 million USD, that has since increased to $23,748,880 (and still rising). The format will be double-elimination, upper and lower brackets. The top eight qualifiers are in the upper bracket, where, if they lose, they will drop to the lower bracket (except the team that makes it to the grand finals -- they don’t get two lifes against the lower bracket competitor). The bottom eight qualifiers start in the lower bracket, where, if they lose, they’re out. All pairings are best-of-three, except the grand finals, which are best-of-five.

valve-2016-the-international-6-logo.png

Like last year, they are doing a “DOTA VR Theater” for those with SteamVR-compatible hardware. This can be used for both replays and live games, including the ability to see the map at human-scale. I’m not sure if it has been significantly updated since last year, but, if you found it entertaining (or you didn’t experience it last year) then it might be something to check out.

The first match, Team Liquid vs Invictus Gaming, is scheduled to begin at 10am PDT (1pm EDT) on Monday!

Source: Valve

Beep beep VROOOM! A remote starter for your PC

Subject: Systems | August 4, 2017 - 03:41 PM |
Tagged: remote starter, microcontroller, DIY

The Tech Report have an interesting project for those interested in building their own electronic gadgets and doohickeys.  They have created a project which uses a NodeMCU open source microcontroller for IoT devices to allow you to remotely power cycle your PC via an RF signal.  The build will teach you about creating your own IoT device, a bit about how to secure said device and insight into the signals which tell your PC to power on or off or to go into sleep mode.  For those already familiar with the components and processes utilized by this project, it is a quick and easy way to design a device that retails for $25, for a lot cheaper.  Take a peek here.

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"Commercially-available remote power switches make turning a PC on and off from a distance a simple task, but our resident microcontroller enthusiast thought of a few ways such a product might be improved. Join us as we see whether those ideas could be implemented for about $10 in parts."

Here are some more Systems articles from around the web:

Systems

Gigabyte's Z270X Ultra Gaming is a bargain

Subject: Motherboards | August 4, 2017 - 02:00 PM |
Tagged: gigabyte, Z270X Ultra Gaming, Prime Z270-A, lga1151, Intel

A Z270 board for under $160 can be hard to find which is what makes this Z270X board interesting.  There were some sacrifices made in the design, all of the reviewers at [H]ard|OCP noticed how thin the PCB is as well as the heatsinks less than robust attachments, not a deal breaker by any means but worth considering if you are a little rough on your components.  The board does still have 7 power phases, the PCIe slots are Armored and there is a new ALC1220 CODEC with a USB DAC UP 2 so Gigabyte did not skimp on the features that matter.  Overclocking was easy and did not require an obscene amount of power for an i7-7700K to hit 5GHz.  You can see the full review over at [H] ... and yes it does have all the RGBs too.

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"GIGABYTE has been on a roll with all it's 2017 offerings. This generation has seen solid boards for both AMD and Intel fans alike. Today, we switch gears and look at the GIGABYTE Z270X Ultra Gaming. It's the most misleading name GIGABYTE has used to date, but comes in with a very affordable price of $160!"

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Rip enough threads and you are going to spring a leak, AMD's Threadripper 1920

Subject: General Tech | August 4, 2017 - 12:44 PM |
Tagged: amd, ryzen, Threadripper, 1920, xfr, leak

Thanks to a few motherboard makers and some good eyes, we now know there will be a Threadripper part without support for AMD's eXtended Frequency Range.  The slightly lower frequencies, 3.2-3.8GHz and lack of XFR suggest this part will sell for less than the $800 which the 1920X is slated to be released at.  This should not mean the chip will not benefit from any of the features of XFR, only that the frequency increments will be larger and less reactive than on an XFR chip, as Tim explained a while back.  There is a benefit to that lack as well, the TDP drops 40W to 140W.  This is a leak so it is possible some of the information is wrong; however it was found in several different places and looks to have been posted accidentally as opposed to release to fuel rumours so it is quite likely the information you can see over at PCWorld is accurate.

threadripper-1920-100730872-orig.jpg

"Tweakers discovered the Threadripper 1920 listed on websites for Asus, Gigabyte, and ASRock. PCWorld was able to confirm the listing on Gigabyte and ASRock’s sites, though Asus has since scrubbed its support page for the $550 ROG Zenith Extreme entirely."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: PCWorld

Intel Coffee Lake Rumors: More Cores and Z270 Incompatibility

Subject: Processors | August 3, 2017 - 10:06 PM |
Tagged: rumor, report, processor, Intel, cpu, core i7, core i5, core i3, coffee lake

You may have heard that Intel's upcoming 8th-generation processors, code named Coffee Lake, won't be compatible with the current Z270 chipset motherboards. Last week we had another round of rumors and reports about these upcoming - and totally incompatible - new CPUs, with wccftech reporting some details on what to expect with the new processors. Spoiler: MORE CORES.

INTEL_CPU.jpg

Image credit: Tech Advisor

We begin with the Intel Core i7-8700K, which will reportedly be the company's first mainstream 6-core processor, with previous hex-core offerings limited to HEDT and server. The i7-8700K will run slightly below the current 4-core i7-7700K, with a base frequency of 3.7 GHz (vs. 4.2 GHz with the i7-7700K) and single-core Turbo speeds topping out at 4.3 GHz according to the report. Another point of interest with the 6-core i7 part is TDP, with 95W needed where even the current HEDT parts are into the 130W territory. What of the Core i5? This is where things get a little more interesting, as there appear to be 6-core parts in the i5 family as well, without Hyper-Threading of course. Even the Core i3 parts jump to 4-core configurations with Coffee Lake, which would obviously be another first.

INTEL_CHART.png

Chart credit Wccftech.com

To editoralize a bit, AMD seems to be in a highly influential position in the wake of Ryzen and Threadripper, as Intel is (reportedly, of course) upping the core counts for Core series processors. Sure, Intel could have done this anyway, but looking at their pre-Ryzen products they were quite happy selling 2 - 4 core parts for premium prices before. This is great news for anyone in an era of increasingly multi-thread optimized computing (as long as pricing remains at or below current offerings), and with this healthy competition the second half of the year might be the best time in a very long time to upgrade - be it Intel or AMD. Now, if only graphics cards would fall back down to earth...

Source: wccftech

I Think They're Big Fans of AMD Threadripper and EPYC... Noctua Announces Three New Coolers.

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 3, 2017 - 08:41 PM |
Tagged: noctua, amd, Threadripper, EPYC

Noctua has announced three new heatsinks for AMD’s new high-end CPU platforms, Threadripper and EPYC. If you’ve been following the company, or Morry’s motherboard reviews, then you know that these coolers are huge (and effective).

noctua-2017-threadripper-cooler.png

Apparently the main difference is the contact surface, 70mm x 56mm, to accommodate for the processor’s large package. AMD connects multiple dies together with their Infinity Fabric, which means a huge total surface area. The cooler comes in three sizes, corresponding to the fan that’s intended to be used with it: 140mm (NH-U14S TR4-SP3), 120mm (NH-U12S TR4-SP3), and 92mm (NH-U9S TR4-SP3).

The two “smallest” sizes, NH-U12S and NH-U9S, are both expected to retail for $69.90 USD, so I guess choose whichever makes the most sense for your system. The largest one, the NH-U14S, is $10 more expensive at $79.90 USD. They should be available by the end of the month.

Source: Noctua

A song of external GPUs; Sonnet' eGFX Breakaway Box

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 3, 2017 - 02:01 PM |
Tagged: external gpu, sonnet, eGFX Breakaway Box, thunderbolt 3

The version of Sonnet's Breakaway Box which Ars Technica tested is priced at $300, for that you get the housing with a 350W PSU inside that can handle a GPU of up to 300W.  There are two other models, the Developer Edition which shipped with Apple's External GPU Dev kit and a higher powered model which can support cards that require up to 375W.  AMD worked with Sonnet to create an optimized driver for this enclosure which has enabled them to retain more performance than NVIDIA on this Thunderbolt 3 enclosure, however all the cards they tested did show performance degradation compared to a GPU inside of a desktop system.  On the other hand that is not what this device is for; it is to enable a laptop to play high end games and in that it does succeed.  Check out the full review here.

arsegpu.PNG

"The Breakaway Box is best described as functional, consisting of a simple steel chassis and vented side panels (neither of which, sadly, feature proper dust filters), with a power supply, 120mm fan, and a single PCIe slot inside."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: Ars Technica

Happy unboxing day, rip them threads

Subject: General Tech | August 3, 2017 - 01:26 PM |
Tagged: amd, Threadripper, unboxing, angel hair

Unboxing videos are perhaps second only to booth babe videos in terms of uselessness; however with Threadripper there is some information to convey.  The mounting process for these new processors is very different than the ZIF of old and while we cannot provide you with any benchmarks we can show you how to install a Threadripper CPU properly.  For those that learn more from their failures than their successes, which should be most of you, Kyle at [H]ard|OCP can give you some insight on just how fragile the pins on these new processors are.

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"We show you how "easily" the AMD Threadripper comes out of the box, and some hilarity ensues, and then we take you through the simple steps of Threadripper installation. I would consider this a PSA as well because I destroyed the socket on my TR4 motherboard."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Podcast #461 - AMD Ryzen 3, Threadripper, Logitech Powerplay, and more!

Subject: General Tech | August 3, 2017 - 12:00 PM |
Tagged: podcast, wolfenstein, wdc, Vibe, Vega Nano, Threadripper, ryzen 3, radeon rx vega, QLC, htc, Fanatec, Clubsport lite elite, BiCS3, amd, video

PC Perspective Podcast #461 - 08/03/17

Join us for AMD Ryzen 3, Threadripper, Logitech Powerplay, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano

Peanut Gallery: Ken Addison, Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:38:20

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
    1. 1:25:45 Ryan: Logitech G903
    2. 1:34:05 Allyn: Things I would have loved to grow up learning / playing (pixel kit): 1 2
  4. Closing/outro

Source: