MSI's B350I PRO AC, gone but not forgotten

Subject: Motherboards | August 24, 2018 - 04:15 PM |
Tagged: mini-itx, msi, b350, B350I PRO AC, amd, ryzen

The MSI B350I Pro AC is not a new motherboard but it is worth remembering for anyone looking to build a small system.  However [H]ard|OCP is teasing you a bit; the board was in stock when they started the review but has been discontinued very recently with the B450I Gaming Plus AC replacing it.  Why is it worth looking at, you may ask?  The board is a solid base to build a SFF system off of and will be selling at a discount if you can find it; so keep your eyes open and you might get it for a song.

15344704084nedbk1kmk_1_7_l.jpg

"While we might be late to the party with a B350 review, we were running tests with it and were so impressed we thought we would put it through the full review process. MSI’s B350I PRO AC might just have been worth the wait. How does this inexpensive powerhouse fair against more expensive offerings?"

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

SanDisk goes to the Extreme with their new portable SSD

Subject: Storage | August 24, 2018 - 01:37 PM |
Tagged: sandisk, extreme portable, 1TB, USB 3.1 gen 2

The SanDisk Extreme Portable 1 TB USB drive has a IP55 rating, which means it can resist large dirt and a bit of sprayed liquid but don't submerse it or use it in an area with fine particulates floating around, such as the entirety of Western Canada at the moment.  Thanks to the transfer speed of the Type-C USB 3.1 Gen 2 connection, 1TB is a reasonable size for a portable SSD, The Tech Report saw transfer speeds in line with what you would expect from this connection.  The casing and design does cost you however, expect to pay upwards of $0.30/GB when picking up this portable SSD.

overview.jpg

"SanDisk's Extreme Portable SSD pairs USB 3.1 Gen 2 transfer rates with a durable, stylish exterior shell. We put the 1-TB Extreme Portable through our testing gauntlet to see whether it's as speedy as it is strong."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Of Intel, Foreshadow, horses and barn doors

Subject: General Tech | August 24, 2018 - 12:29 PM |
Tagged: Foreshadow, Intel, hyperthreading, L1TF, spectre, security, patch

In a move which should not come as a shock to anyone, Intel removed the wording which was revealed yesterday along with their Foreshadow patch for desktop CPUs prohibiting publishing comparative performance results.   The reason Intel would rather you didn't post performance comparisons, pre and post patch, is that along with the microcode update HyperThreading needs to be disabled which has a noticeable effect on any multi-threaded application.  Debian were of great help with this, refusing to deply the microcode patch with the gag order in place. 

Red Hat foreshadowed what you will see with their results from the server chip patches, The Register notes as being "from a +30 per cent gain, to -50 per cent loss and beyond. Most HT testing, however, showed losses in the 0-30 per cent range."

187032066-612x612.jpg

"Intel has backtracked on the license for its latest microcode update that mitigates security vulnerabilities in its processors – after the previous wording outlawed public benchmarking of the chips."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

Podcast #510 - NVIDIA 2080 Launch, blockchain gaming, and more!

Subject: General Tech | August 23, 2018 - 03:54 PM |
Tagged: Volta, video, turing, Threadripper, rtx, podcast, nzxt, nvidia, logitech, arm, amd

PC Perspective Podcast #510 - 08/23/18

Join us this week for discussion on NVIDIA 2080 Launch, blockchain gaming, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:24:43

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:14:15 Jeremy: I love 14cm fans!
  4. Closing/outro
 
 
Source:

No, the naming of the Corsair RMx Series 750W does not imply RMA

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 23, 2018 - 03:14 PM |
Tagged: modular psu, corsair, RMx Series, 750w

The RMx naming separates this PSU from the RMi lineup which includes Corsair's Link which reduces the price somewhat and the 850W model was good enough to receive a Gold Award from Lee.  [H]ard|OCP tested out the 750W member of this family, enough power for many builds, to see if it matched the quality of its big brother.  Their tests showed a solid PSU that met all the requirements for a pass and a Silver; though it does have a small problem. Last years Corsair TX750M is every bit as good and at a lower price with only one possible drawback, the ATX power connector is not modular.  This will not matter as all motherboards like to have their power in order to POST.  Check out the full review here.

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"Corsair has been bumping up its street cred lately with PSU designs that are up to HardOCP standards. Today we have its latest 2018 version of the RM series PSU rated at 750 watts. It features Gold efficiency, a fully modular design, has a 10 year warranty, and carries with it a fully modular design, all for the price of $110."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Chrome's anonym-ish incognito mode

Subject: General Tech | August 23, 2018 - 12:27 PM |
Tagged: chrome, google, incognito, obvious

To cut straight to the chase, if you are browsing anonymously and log into one of your accounts, you are no longer anonymous; a seemingly obvious fact which is making headlines today.  A Google rep feels this is being pushed by Oracle who are hoping to turn public opinion against Google, though how that would affect their ongoing legal battles is unclear.  The timing is rather unfortunate as the publics opinion of Google plummeted after being reminded that Google Maps always knows where you are if you have it installed. 

The Inquirer does remind us what is worth getting upset about; Google's unsubstantiated claim that they offer tools to prevent their products from tracking you and a way to delete your entire history. 

incognito-mode1.jpg

"A researcher from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee found that although the data collected appears to be anonymised, in reality, Google can retroactively identify it from the usernames and other account data used during the session."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer

High-ish end, in-ear headphones from Etymotic

Subject: General Tech | August 22, 2018 - 04:05 PM |
Tagged: in-ear, Etymotic, ER3XR, audio

In-ear headphones are generally a compromise between convenience and quality; short of some royal sized ears no one will be introducing a 40mm driver into their ear canal.  Etymotic does not follow this assumption however, the $180 ER3 series is not their high end earphones, a set of ER4s would set you back almost twice that much.  TechPowerUp have tried both, and sing their praises so it seems there must be something to this design.  Check out their full review of the ER3XR here, if you feel your ears might be worth of such ostentatious treatment.

cover.jpg

"Etymotic's ER3-series in-ears aim to bring their ER4 design into a lower price category. Priced at $179, the ER3s are nearly half the price of the ER4-series in-ears, and their specification sheets show that they are not far off. We take a good look at the new in-ears to see how they fare against their bigger brethren."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: TechPowerUp

I've been gaming on the block-chain

Subject: General Tech | August 22, 2018 - 02:42 PM |
Tagged: blockchain, blockchain tycoon, gaming, ridiculous

It has finally happened, the application of blockchains to everything under the sun has now grown to encompass a game, aptly called Blockchain Tycoon.  In it, you virtually mine virtual currency, using that to purchase more systems to add to your mining power so that you can mine faster and buy more GPUs and so on and so on.  From the playthrough Rock, Paper SHOTGUN tried, within 10 minutes you are dumping your GPUs for ASICs but sadly there is no mechanic to sell those GPUs to unsuspecting eBay shoppers to buy more ASICs or upgrade your HVAC.

In short the game sounds every bit as fun as actual cryptocurrency mining, except you don't actually lose your shirt when the market crashes ... again.

Blockchain9-1212x682.jpg

"This week, Fraser’s delving into the confusing world of cryptocurrencies in Blockchain Tycoon. What is a blockchain? Why are people mining them? Are there tiny digital pickaxes? A lot of questions need to be answered."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

NVIDIA teases RTX 2080 performance and features

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Shows and Expos | August 22, 2018 - 02:06 PM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 2080, nvidia, geforce, ansel

NVIDIA has been showing off a slideshow in Germany, offering a glimpse at the new features Turing brings to the desktop as well as in-house performance numbers.  As you can see below, their testing shows a significant increase in performance from Pascal, it will be interesting to see how the numbers match up once reviewers get their hands on these cards.

TuringVsPascal_EditorsDay_Aug22_2-.png

While those performance numbers should be taken with a grain of salt or three, the various features which the new generation of chip brings to the table will appear as presented.   For fans of Ansel, you will be able to upscale your screenshots to 8k with Ansel AI UpRes, which offers an impressive implementation of anti-aliasing.  They also showed off a variety of filtres you can utilize to make your screenshots even more impressive.

up yer rez.PNG

The GigaRays of real time ray tracing capability on Turing look very impressive but with Ansel, your card has a lot more time to process reflections, refractions and shadows which means your screenshots will look significantly more impressive than what the game shows while you are playing.  In the example below you can see how much more detail a little post-processing can add.

rt scale.PNG

There are a wide variety of released and upcoming games which will support these features; 22 listed by name at the conference.  A few of the titles only support some of the new features, such as NVIDIA Highlights, however the games below should offer full support, as well as framerates high enough to play at 4k with HDR enabled.

TuringVsPascal_EditorsDay_Aug22.png

Keep your eyes peeled for more news from NVIDIA and GamesCom.

Source: NVIDIA

Your smart plug's connected to your idiotbox, the idiotbox is connected to your WiFi, the ...

Subject: General Tech | August 22, 2018 - 12:59 PM |
Tagged: iot, security

Belkin offers a smartplug called the Wemo Insight which provides real time energy usage stats, allows you to program your lights to turn on and off at various times and is a decent  replacement for The Clapper; it is also a fairly serious security risk.  The UPnP protocol it utilizes is vulnerable to a buffer overflow attack which could allow an attacker access to other devices connected to your WiFi network.  The proof of concept provided by McAfee shows a successful attack on a Roku, initiated from the smartplug, as you can see over at El Reg.

Perhaps you should keep that old tech if you don't like touching light switches.

"The flaw, spotted in Belkin's Wemo Insight smartplugs, would potentially allow an attacker to not only manipulate the plug itself, but also allow hopping to other devices connected to the same Wi-Fi home network."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Turing vs Volta: Two Chips Enter. No One Dies.

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 21, 2018 - 08:43 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, Volta, turing, tu102, gv100

In the past, when NVIDIA launched a new GPU architecture, they would make a few designs for each of their market segments. All SKUs would be one of those chips, with varying amounts of it disabled or re-clocked to hit multiple price points. The mainstream enthusiast (GTX -70/-80) chip of each generation is typically 300mm2, and the high-end enthusiast (Titan / -80 Ti) chip is often around 600mm2.

nvidia-2016-gtc-pascal-banner.png

Kepler used quite a bit of that die space for FP64 calculations, but that did not happen with consumer versions of Pascal. Instead, GP100 supported 1:2:4 FP64:FP32:FP16 performance ratios. This is great for the compute community, such as scientific researchers, but games are focused on FP32. Shortly thereafter, NVIDIA releases GP102, which had the same number of FP32 cores (3840) as GP100 but with much-reduced 64-bit performance… and much reduced die area. GP100 was 610mm2, but GP102 was just 471mm2.

At this point, I’m thinking that NVIDIA is pulling scientific computing chips away from the common user to increase the value of their Tesla parts. There was no reason to either make a cheap 6XXmm2 card available to the public, and a 471mm2 part could take the performance crown, so why not reap extra dies from your wafer (and be able to clock them higher because of better binning)?

nvidia-2017-sc17-japanaisuper.jpg

And then Volta came out. And it was massive (815mm2).

At this point, you really cannot manufacture a larger integrated circuit. You are at the limit of what TSMC (and other fabs) can focus onto your silicon. Again, it’s a 1:2:4 FP64:FP32:FP16 ratio. Again, there is no consumer version in sight. Again, it looked as if NVIDIA was going to fragment their market and leave consumers behind.

And then Turing was announced. Apparently, NVIDIA still plans on making big chips for consumers… just not with 64-bit performance. The big draw of this 754mm2 chip is its dedicated hardware for raytracing. We knew this technology was coming, and we knew that the next generation would have technology to make this useful. I figured that meant consumer-Volta, and NVIDIA had somehow found a way to use Tensor cores to cast rays. Apparently not… but, don’t worry, Turing has Tensor cores too… they’re just for machine-learning gaming applications. Those are above and beyond the raytracing ASICs, and the CUDA cores, and the ROPs, and the texture units, and so forth.

nvidia-2018-geforce-rtx-turing-630-u.jpg

But, raytracing hype aside, let’s think about the product stack:

  1. NVIDIA now has two ~800mm2-ish chips… and
  2. They serve two completely different markets.

In fact, I cannot see either FP64 or raytracing going anywhere any time soon. As such, it’s my assumption that NVIDIA will maintain two different architectures of GPUs going forward. The only way that I can see this changing is if they figure out a multi-die solution, because neither design can get any bigger. And even then, what workload would it even perform? (Moment of silence for 10km x 10km video game maps.)

What do you think? Will NVIDIA keep two architectures going forward? If not, how will they serve all of their customers?

Momma don't take my Ornata Chroma-way

Subject: General Tech | August 21, 2018 - 06:08 PM |
Tagged: mem-chanical, Ornata Chroma, razer, input, rgbv

Your new word for today is mem-chanical, which describes a crossbred keyboard with both membranes and a spring, which makes the keyboard feel like a mechanical keyboard without actually being one.  In theory this is to keep the cost down, though The Tech Report points out that the Razer Ornata Chroma keyboard costs as much as many mechanical keyboards.  That said, the implementation is effective to the point where it is unlikely you could tell the difference between a mechanical keyboard and the Ornata Chroma; until you lift your finger slightly.  Learn more about this type of keyboard in general and Razer's implementation specifically in the full review.

topdown.png

"Razer's Ornata Chroma keyboard tries to meld two things that usually go together like oil and water for keyboard enthusiasts: the clickiness of mechanical switches with the affordability of rubber domes. We got the Ornata Chroma's Mecha-Membrane switches under our fingers to see if Razer succeeded."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Vive la différence! Threadripper 2 on Linux and Windows 10

Subject: Processors | August 21, 2018 - 03:51 PM |
Tagged: 2990wx, threadripper 2, linux, windows 10, amd

Windows 10 is much better at dealing with multithreaded tasks but Linux has been optimized for both high core counts and NUMA for quite a while, so looking at the performance difference is quite interesting.  Phoronix tested a variety of Linux flavours as well as Windows 10 Pro and the performance differences are striking, in some cases we see results twice as fast on Linux as Win10.  That does not hold true for all tests as there are some benchmarks which Windows excels at.  Take a look at this full review as well as those under the fold for a fuller picture.

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"Complementing the extensive Linux benchmarks done earlier today of the AMD Threadripper 2990WX in our review (as well as on the Threadripper 2950X), in this article are our first Windows 10 vs. Linux benchmarks of this 32-core / 64-thread $1799 USD processor. Tests were done from Microsoft Windows 10 against Clear Linux, Ubuntu 18.04, the Arch-based Antergos 18.7-Rolling, and openSUSE Tumbleweed."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Source: Phoronix

The power of excess, Lian Li's Strimer RGB power cables

Subject: General Tech | August 21, 2018 - 02:14 PM |
Tagged: Lian Li, strimer, RGB

The Lian Li Strimer is a extension for your 24 pin ATX power cable, 200 mm in length or roughly 7.8" long.  There are two parts to the cable, the white one transfers the power while the clear RGB cable attaches to the top of the white with clips.  It also ships with a controller, which you can use if your motherboard lacks a 3-pin RGB header; rare to find these days.  If you need a rainbow bridge in your system to take your RGB addiction to new levels this might be worth picking up.  The Guru of 3D shows you exactly what this power cable can do here.

img_5880.jpg

"Lian Li release the Strimer, a simple enough ATX power cable extension, that offers a layer of RGB. The looks are daunting, special and do make your PC look like something else. Yes, illuminate that ATX cable harness."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Guru of 3D

Asus Announces ROG Strix, Dual, and Turbo Series RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 Graphics Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 03:08 PM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, nvidia, geforce, asus

Following Jensen Huang's reveal of the RTX family of Turing-based graphics cards, Asus announced that it will have graphics cards from its ROG Strix, Dual, and Turbo product lines available in mid-September. The new graphics cards will be based around the NVIDIA Geforce RTX 2080 Ti and the Geforce RTX 2080 GPUs.

Asus ROG Strix RTX 2080.jpg

According to Asus, their new Turing-based graphics cards will be built using their Auto-Extreme technology and with redesigned coolers to increase card-to-card product consistency and cooling efficiency. The triple fan ROG Strix and dual fan Dual series cards use a new 2.7 slot design that results in 20% and 50% increases (respectively) in cooling array surface area versus their 1000 series predecessors. The ROG Strix card uses Axial fans that reportedly offer better airflow and IP5X dust resistance while the Dual series cards use Wing Blade fans that also offer dust resistance along with being allegedly quieter while pushing more air. Meanwhile, the Turbo series uses a blower-style cooler that has been redesigned and uses an 80mm dual ball bearing fan with a new shroud that allows for more airflow even in small cases or when cards are sandwiched together in a multi-GPU setup.

The ROG Strix RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 cards will have one USB Type-C (VirtualLink), two HDMI 2.0b, and two Display Port 1.4a outputs. The Dual RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 cards will have one USB Type-C, one HDMI 2.0b, and three Display Port 1.4 outputs. Finally, the Turbo series RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 cards will have one USB Type-C, one HDMI 2.0b, and two Display Port 1.4 ports.

  RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 
GPU TU102 TU104
GPU Cores 4352 2944
Base Clock 1350 MHz (Turbo model) 1515 MHz (Turbo model)
Boost Clock 1545 MHz (Turbo model) 1710 MHz (Turbo model)
Tensor Cores 576 384
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 8 GRays/s
Memory 11GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz 
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 256-bit G6
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 448 GB/s
TDP ?
Process Tech 12nm 12nm

Exact specification are still unknown though Asus did reveal clockspeeds for the Turbo models which are listed above. The clockspeeds for the Dual and ROG Strix cards should be quite a bit higher than those thanks to the much beefier coolers, and the OC Editions in particular should be clocked higher than reference specs.

Asus Turbo RTX 2080 Ti.jpg

Asus did not disclose exact MSRP pricing, but it did state that several models will be available for pre-order starting today and will be officially avaialble in the middle of September. It appears that a couple RTX 2080 Ti and RTX 2080 cards have already appeared on Newegg, but not all of them have shown up yet. The models slated to be available for preorder include the Dual GeForce RTX 2080 Ti OC Edition, Turbo RTX 2080 Ti, ROG Strix GeForce RTX 2080 OC Edition, and the Dual RTX 2080 OC Edition.

Related reading:

Source: Asus

NVIDIA Announces GeForce RTX 2070, RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti at Gamescom 2018

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 01:58 PM |
Tagged: turing, tensor cores, rtx 2080ti, RTX 2080, RTX 2070, rtx, rt cores, ray tracing, quadro, preorder, nvidia, gtx, geforce

Amazon.com has its preorder and product listing pages for the various GeForce RTX cards live!

* Update *

NVIDIA's pre-order page is now live, as well as info on the RTX 2070! Details below:

2018-08-20-13-22-43-.png

*Update 2 *

Post-Founders Edition pricing comes in a bit lower than the Founders pricing noted above:

2018-08-20-13-59-58-.png

* End update *

Much to no one's surprise after the launch of the Quadro RTX lineup and the many subsequent leaks, today NVIDIA officially announced their next generation GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti gaming GPUs.

Just like we saw with the Quadro RTX lineup, NVIDIA is designating these gaming-oriented graphics card with the RTX brand to emphasize their capabilities with ray tracing.

Through the combination of dedicated Ray Tracing  (RT) cores and Tensor cores for AI-powered denoising, NVIDIA is claiming these RTX GPUs are capable of high enough ray tracing performance to be used real-time in games, as shown by their demos of titles of Battlefield V, Shadow of the Tomb Raider, and Metro: Exodus.

Not every GPU in NVIDIA's lineup will be capable of this real-time ray tracing performance, with those lower tier cards retaining the traditional GTX branding.

Here are the specifications as we know them so far compared to the Quadro RTX cards, as well as the previous generation GeForce cards, and the top offering from AMD.

  RTX 2080 Ti Quadro RTX 6000 GTX 1080 Ti RTX 2080  Quadro RTX 5000 GTX 1080 TITAN V RX Vega 64 (Air) RTX 2070
GPU TU102 TU102 GP102 TU104 TU104 GP104 GV100 Vega 64 ?
GPU Cores 4352 4608 3584 2944 3072 2560 5120 4096 2304
Base Clock 1350 ? 1408 MHz 1515 ? 1607 MHz 1200 MHz 1247 MHz 1410
Boost Clock 1545
1635 FE
? 1582 MHz 1710
1800 FE
? 1733 MHz 1455 MHz 1546 MHz 1620
1710 FE
Texture Units ? ? 224 ? ? 160 320 256 ?
ROP Units ? ? 88 ? ? 64 96 64 ?
Tensor Cores 576 576 -- 384 384 -- 640 -- ?
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s 10 GRays/s -- 8 GRays/s 6? GRays/s -- -- -- 6 GRays/s
Memory 11GB 24GB 11GB 8GB 16GB 8GB 12GB  8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  11000 MHz 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  10000 MHz 1700 MHz 1890 MHz 14000 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 384-bit G6 352-bit G5X 256-bit G6 256-bit G6 256-bit G5X 3072-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2 256-bit G6
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 672GB/s 484 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 320 GB/s 653 GB/s 484 GB/s 448GB/s
TDP 250W
260 FE
300 watts 250 watts 215W
225W FE
? 180 watts 250W 292 175W
185 FE
Peak Compute ? ? 10.6 TFLOPS ? ? 8.2 TFLOPS 14.9 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS ?
Transistor Count ? ? 12.0 B ? ? 7.2 B 21.0 B 12.5 B ?
Process Tech 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 12nm 16nm 12nm 14nm ?
MSRP (current) $1200/
$1000
$6,300 $699 $800/
$700
$2,300 $549 $2,999 $499

$600/
$500

We hope to fill out the rest of the information on these GPUs in the coming days during subsequent press briefings during Gamescom.

One big change to the RTX lineup is NVIDIA's revised Founders Edition cards. Instead of the blower-style cooler that we've seen on every other NVIDIA reference design, the Founder's Edition RTX cards instead move to a dual-axial fan setup, similar to 3rd party designs in the past.

These new GPUs do not come cheaply, however, with an increased MSRP across the entire lineup when compared to the 1000-series cards. The RTX 2080 Ti's MSRP of $1200 is an increase of $500 over the previous generation GTX 1080 Ti, while the GTX 2080 sports a $200 increase over the GTX 2080. These prices will come down after the Founders Edition wave pricing passes (the same was done with the GTX 10xx launches).

Both the Founder's Edition card from NVIDIA, as well as third-party designs from partners such as EVGA and ASUS, are available for preorder from retailers including Amazon and Newegg starting today and are set to ship on August 27th.

Source: NVIDIA

Newegg Lists GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti Graphics Cards Before Announcement

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 12:15 PM |
Tagged: video card, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, nvidia, newegg, graphics, gpu, geforce

Newegg has listed NVIDIA GeForce RTX cards ahead of a probably announcement at today's "BeForTheGame" event in Germany, apparently confirming the rumors about the existence of these two GPUs. Both RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti cards are featured on this Newegg promo page:

RTX.PNG

Clearly this went live a bit early (none of the linked RTX products bring up a valid page yet) as NVIDIA's announcement has yet to take place, though live coverage continues on NVIDIA's Twitch channel now.

Source: Newegg

NVIDIA Announcement Live Stream at 12:00 PM Eastern Today

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 20, 2018 - 11:30 AM |
Tagged: video card, nvidia, live stream, graphics, gpu, announcement

The wait (and endless speculation) is nearly over, as NVIDIA will will be hosting their "BeForTheGame" event with probable product announcements at noon eastern today, and this will be streamed live on the company's Twitch channel.

You can watch the event right here:

Watch live video from NVIDIA on www.twitch.tv

Will there be new GeForce cards? Is it GTX or RTX? Were the rumors true or totally off-base? There is only one way to find out! (And of course we will cover any news stories emerging from this event, so stay tuned!)

Source: Twitch.tv

Rumor: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti Product and PCB Images Leak

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 17, 2018 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: VideoCardz, video card, rumor, RTX 2080 Ti, RTX 2080, report, pcb, nvidia, leak, graphics, gpu

The staff at VideoCardz.com have been a very busy of late, posting various articles on rumored NVIDIA graphics cards expected to be revealed this month. Today in particular we are seeing more (and more) information and imagery concerning what seems assured to be RTX 2080 branding, and somewhat surprising is the rumor that the RTX 2080 Ti will launch simultaneously (with a reported 4352 CUDA cores, no less).

MSI_RTX2080_Cards.jpg

Reported images of MSI GAMING X TRIO variants of RTX 2080/2080 Ti (via VideoCardz)

From the reported product images one thing in particular stand out, as memory for each card appears unchanged from current GTX 1080 and 1080 Ti cards, at 8GB and 11GB, respectively (though a move to GDDR6 from GDDR5X has also been rumored/reported).

Even (reported) PCB images are online, with this TU104-400-A1 quality sample pictured on Chiphell via VideoCardz.com:

RTX2080_PCB.jpg

The TU104-400-A1 pictured is presumed to be the RTX 2080 GPU (Chiphell via VideoCardz)

Other product images from AIB partners (PALIT and Gigabyte) were recently posted over at VideoCardz.com if you care to take a look, and as we near a likely announcement it looks like the (reported) leaks will keep on coming.

Source: VideoCardz

PCPer Mailbag #55 - Under Negative Pressure

Subject: Editorial | August 17, 2018 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: video, Ryan Shrout, pcper mailbag

It's time for the PCPer Mailbag, our weekly show where Ryan and the team answer your questions about the tech industry, the latest and greatest GPUs, the process of running a tech review website, and more!

Yeah, OK, we missed a few weeks. It's all Jim's fault. Anyway, Ryan's back to tackle these questions:

00:22 - SATA cable failures?
01:54 - Tiered storage for consumers? Windows Storage Spaces vs. StoreMI?
04:29 - Low-end PC gaming vs. future consoles?
07:11 - Ryzen cores on future consoles?
10:34 - GPU for 1440p HDR ultrawide?
12:25 - TR4 socket issue?
13:26 - Why doesn't Intel make RAM?
14:40 - Negative pressure PC case?
16:05 - Normalizing RAM prices?

Want to have your question answered on a future Mailbag? Leave a comment on this post or in the YouTube comments for the latest video. Check out new Mailbag videos each Friday!

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel to make sure you never miss our weekly reviews and podcasts, and please consider supporting PC Perspective via Patreon to help us keep videos like our weekly mailbag coming!

Source: YouTube