AMD Ryzen Threadripper Installation and Unboxing

Subject: Processors | August 3, 2017 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: Threadripper, ryzen, amd

Though we are a full week away from the release of the Ryzen Threadripper reviews, AMD is letting us share the installation process of the new TR4 socket, as well as an unboxing of the awesome kit that AMD put together for media and reviewers. Enjoy!

Unreal Engine 4 Enterprise Sizzle Video

Subject: General Tech | August 2, 2017 - 11:41 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, epic games, unreal engine 4, ue4

Apart from a Fortnite clip that they snuck in, Epic Games has published a video to highlight the recent use of Unreal Engine 4 in the enterprise. The game engine is attractive to several industries, including architectural visualization, product demos, and even rendering video for TVs and movies. For instance, you can walk through a building (even in VR) that you’re intending to create and move walls around, or customize a car and see it in that state before you order it.

One that caught my eye was the Paris VR demo from The Chainsmokers and Sony Music. This was the first that I’ve heard of it, but I find kind-of abstract, music video demos interesting. It reminds me a little of the Ellie Goulding WebGL demo from back in 2011. It should be a cute little demo if you have a PSVR, although you can also watch a playthrough on YouTube.

Amazon Web Services Releases Lumberyard Beta 1.10

Subject: General Tech | August 2, 2017 - 08:03 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, amazon

Amazon Web Services launched a new version of their Lumberyard game engine at SIGGRAPH. They advertise that the new version, Lumberyard Beta 1.10, is 50% original code from when they launched back in February 2016. The engine started as a fork of CryEngine, and I’ve watched it evolve rapidly since about November. They’re pushing the engine into sort-of an entity-component framework, similar to Unity, but with a focus on C++ and Lua. You create scripts that define some functionality, then place them on the relevant entities (versus making a hierarchy of strict subclasses like you would do in Unreal Engine 4’s C++ API).

Amazon’s visual scripting system, Script Canvas, was supposed to launch in 1.10 but I can’t see it mentioned so I’m guessing it slipped.

So what does the version have? Mostly a bunch of new rendering features. Lumberyard 1.10 adds temporal anti-aliasing and order-independent transparency. Lumberyard, because it is a deferred renderer, cannot use MSAA. The engine currently supports FXAA and SMAA, as well as supersampling of course, but 1.10 adds TAA, which blends parts of previous frames into the current one. Since the point of anti-aliasing is to know all the geometry that makes up a pixel, not just what is on top and dead center, sub-pixel variation should eventually average out to a clean image.

Order-independent transparency should be more interesting. I don’t think it’s currently available in Unreal Engine 4 or (stock) Unity 5, although I could be wrong on that, but it is noticeable for scenes with a lot of transparency. To drive the point home, NVIDIA Research made a demo in Lumberyard for GDC with glasses in a bar, embedded above. As the camera pans around the glasses, you can see the multiple reflections in the top-left side of the upside-down glass is much more stable on the left image, and where the two reflections meet in the center blends correctly.

Lumberyard 1.10 also includes a lot of editor UI tweaks, which isn’t appealing to write about but... honestly... that’s what you want in a professional content creation tool update. Their entity component tools seem to be growing nicely from the screenshots I’ve seen.

You can download Lumberyard 1.10 free from their website.

Source: Amazon

Western Digital BiCS3 Flash Goes QLC - 96GB per die!

Subject: Storage | August 2, 2017 - 06:21 PM |
Tagged: western digital, wdc, WD, tlc, slc, QLC, nand, mlc, flash, 96GB, 768Gb, 3d

A month ago, WD and Toshiba each put out releases related to their BiCS 3D Flash memory. WD announced 96 layers (BiCS4) as their next capacity node, while Toshiba announced them reliably storing four bits per cell (QLC).

FMS-QLC.jpg

WD recently did their own press release related to QLC, partially mirroring Toshiba's announcement, but this one had some additional details on capacity per die, as well as stating their associated technology name used for these shifts. TLC was referred to as "X3", and "X4" is the name for their QLC tech as applied to BiCS. The WD release stated that X4 tech, applied to BiCS3, yields 768Gbit (96GB) per die vs. 512Gbit (64GB) per die for X3 (TLC). Bear in mind that while the release (and the math) states this is a 50% increase, moving from TLC to QLC with the same number of cells does only yields a 33% increase, meaning X4 BiCS3 dies need to have additional cells (and footprint) to add that extra 17%.

The release ends by hinting at X4 being applied to BiCS4 in the future, which is definitely exciting. Merging the two recently announced technologies would yield a theoretical 96-layer BiCS4 die, using X4 QLC technology, yielding 1152 Gbit (144GB) per die. A 16 die stack of which would come to 2,304 GB (1.5x the previously stated 1.5TB figure). The 2304 figure might appear incorrect but consider that we are multiplying two 'odd' capacities together (768 Gbit (1.5x512Gbit for TLC) and 96 layers (1.5x64 for X3).

Press blast appears after the break.

Hit the town in Pillars of Eternity 2

Subject: General Tech | August 2, 2017 - 01:55 PM |
Tagged: Pillars of Eternity 2, gaming

A new video showing off Pillars of Eternity 2 game play was posted over at Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN.  It focuses on a town called Nekataka which you will be exploring in the sequel to the popular RPG.  Sailing will also be a large part of the game, not just for fast travel as there will also be naval combat, a feature with a troubled history in gaming.  There is still no specific release date for the game, only that it will launch in 2018.  It is fully funded but you can still get backer bonuses if you head to their Fig page and donate.

deadfire-playerexperience-2560x1440.jpg

"How pleasing it is, then, to see precisely the kind of big old city I want to visit in the latest update video. It’s called Neketaka, a name I will always enjoy saying out loud but will almost certainly mangle the vowels of every time I write it down."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

FSP releases a trio of Platinum PSUs

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 2, 2017 - 01:30 PM |
Tagged: FSP Group, modular psu, 750w, 650W, 550W, Hydro PTM, 80 Plus Platinum

FSP Group have just released three new 80 Plus Platinum Hydro PTM modular PSUs, in 750W, 650W and 550W models.  The Hydro branding comes from the fluid dynamic bearings in the 135mm fan which they have optimized for quiet operation.

Hydro PTM-750W_002.jpg

The 750W model has a pair of 4+4 power plugs for X299 users, the other two models will not though all will use ribbon cables to help you with cable management.  Internally you will find Japanese industrial grade electrolytic caps and a single 12V rail which will provide higher quality power than multiple rail designs.   All models will come with a 10 year warranty.

PR below the fold.

Source: FSP Group

Acer's take on a VR headset comes at a reasonable price

Subject: General Tech | August 2, 2017 - 12:55 PM |
Tagged: AR, acer

Acer's new mixed reality headset, is now available from the Microsoft Store.  The $300 price tag compares extremely favourably to the $3000 Hololens that Microsoft is selling.  The two headsets will both run on Windows Holographic and will have steep hardware requirements.  Acer recommends a Ryzen 8 1700 or Core i7 paired with at least an RX 480 or GTX 980 and 16GB of RAM.  The headset will not be able to overlay virtual images over real objects, hence the mixed reality moniker, rather it will be somewhat like a VR environment to work in.  Drop by The Inquirer for a peek.

MSWindowsMRAcer19201080RGB-540x334.jpg

"The headset we tested in prototype last month is available to anyone looking to build content for it, for $300 a squirt. It had been made available in private beta to some devs back in April but now it's in the Microsoft Store."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer

The Khronos Group Releases OpenGL 4.6

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 2, 2017 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: spir-v, opengl, Khronos

While Vulkan has been getting a lot of mindshare recently, OpenGL is still in active development. This release, OpenGL 4.6, adds a bunch of extensions into the core specification, making them more reliably available to engines. There’s a lot of them this time, many of which seem to borrow design elements from the work done on Vulkan.

khronos-2017-logo-OpenGL_500px_June16.png

The headlining feature is SPIR-V support as an ARB extension, which frees OpenGL programs from having their shaders written in GLSL. Many engines write their shaders in HLSL and use a transpiler to generate the corresponding GLSL, which may not support all features. The extension might also help titles target both OpenGL and Vulkan, although I’m not sure why we would see a driver that supports OpenGL 4.6 but not Vulkan.

Another extension is GL_KHR_no_error, which tells graphics drivers that they do not need to generate errors at runtime. This will save a bit of driver overhead. GL_ARB_indirect_parameters also helps with CPU overhead by allowing draws to pass parameters to other GPU-initiated draws, although this is a bit out of my domain. Also, if you’re not working in SPIR-V, GL_KHR_parallel_shader_compile will allow the driver to compile your GLSL shaders across multiple worker threads.

NVIDIA has a beta driver for developers, which is a couple of versions back compared to their consumer version, so you don’t want to install it unless you intend on developing OpenGL 4.6 applications. Mesa says that they shouldn’t be too far behind.

Slip a Viper on your head, Patriot's new gaming headsets

Subject: General Tech | August 1, 2017 - 01:59 PM |
Tagged: audio, patriot, V361, V370, gaming headset, virtual 7.1, Viper

Patriot's new Viper V361 And V370 headsets are virtual twins, virtual 7.1 surround sound in fact.  They share the same specifications, a dynamic range of 20 Hz – 20 KHz, 32Ohm
impedance and 40mm neodymium drivers with 30mm neodymium sub-drivers to provide the virtual surround sound.  Indeed at first look the only difference is the price, $50 for the V361 and $70 for the V370.  Techgage discovered the difference, the V370 is thoroughly infected with RGB-itis, if you find yourself in need of a glowing head.  As for the audio quality, check out the full review.

Patriot-V361-V370-Both-Headsets-680x428.jpg

"How often does a product force you into an attitude adjustment? Patriot’s V361 and V370 headsets have revealed themselves to be a pair of price and performance champs. The best thing? They prove that virtual surround sound doesn’t need to be pricey to be desirable. Let’s check them out."

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Audio Corner

Source: Techgage

Unmasking a new photolithography technique

Subject: General Tech | August 1, 2017 - 12:24 PM |
Tagged: photolithography, DOLFIN

In the eternal search for ways to fabricate smaller features in semiconductors, EUV seems to be the current focus for production facilities.  Researchers at the University of Chicago and the Argonne National Laboratory may have a solution which could prove to be very useful in the future and could even see the mask technology currently used in photolithography become obsolete.  DOLFIN, aka Direct Optical Lithography of Functional Inorganic Nanomaterials, creates features by making a film of nanoparticles with photoactive ligands which is then covered in a glas or quartz mask with a patterned metal layer and exposed to UV light.  This is very similar to current methods, the mask is reusable and the amount of UV light required is similar to that needed currently. 

This method differs in several ways, not least of which is it does not require as many rare and unhealthy solutes.  What could really help it take off is the fact that seems to be cheaper and more reliable than current processes and it is capable of creating a six-layer 3D pattern in 19 process steps; conventional technology would take 43 steps.  There is more over at Nanotechweb.

allyn-intel-25nm-nand-bunnysuit.jpg

"The fact that the dose of UV required in the new technique is comparable to that for conventional photoresists opens up a plethora of opportunities for advanced device manufacturing, he tells nanotechweb.org."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Nanotechweb

Report: Wolfenstein 2 Optimized for AMD Vega with FP16 Shader Support

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 1, 2017 - 12:05 PM |
Tagged: Wolfenstein 2, vulkan, Vega, id Tech 6, id software, half-precision, game engine, FP16, amd

According to a report from Golem.de (German language), with the upcoming Wolfenstein 2: The New Colossus game AMD Vega owners will have the advantage of FP16 shader support from a new version of the id Tech 6 engine. The game supports both DX12 and the Vulkan API, but the use of half-precision calculations - the scope of which has not been specified - will potentially offer higher frame-rates for AMD Vega users.

vega-26.jpg

AMD provided some technical details about Wolfenstein 2 during their Threadripper/Vega tech day, and this new game includes “special optimizations” in the id Tech 6 game engine for AMD Vega hardware:

“For what exactly id Software (is using) FP16 instead of FP32, AMD did not say. These could post-processing effects, such as bloom. The performance should increase in the double-digit percentage range, (though) id Software did not want to comment on it.” (Translated from German.)

Source: Golem.de

To blindly go where no monitor has gone before

Subject: Displays | July 31, 2017 - 03:58 PM |
Tagged: gsync, freesync

At recent AMD events, attendees were invited to try a blind sight test (an oxymoron if there ever was one) in which they had a chance to play on a AMD system with the new Vega GPU and Freesync as well as a machine powered by a GTX 1080 and G-Sync.  The two machines and monitors were concealed so you could not tell which was which.

Seeing as how many of us did not have a chance to attend these conferences nor see the difference between the two, [H]ard|OCP decided to replicate the experiment, albeit with a GTX 1080 Ti in the G-Sync system.  The two Windows 10 64-bit systems were powered by a AMD Ryzen 7 1800X CPU with 16GB of DDR4-2666MHz; the only difference was the GPU and display.   The two displays were capable of up to a 100Hz refresh rate and the display settings were matched as well as humanly possible.  The two monitors were a $720 ASUS MX34V with FreeSync and a $1300 ASUS PG348 G-Sync display, something worth noting for those with a shopping list.

Check out the video of the subjective experiences of the participants here, remembering that this is not exactly a rigid scientific experiment.

1501092044luf12r9i4c_1_6_l.jpg

"Totally unscientific and subjective testing is scorned by many, so if that gets your panties in a bunch, I suggest you stop reading. We had the opportunity to preview AMD's RX Vega this weekend, and we put it up against NVIDIA's GTX 1080 Ti, both using 100Hz FreeSync and G-Sync panels, with our testers representing 223 combined years of gaming experience."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Ryzen and Radeon Roundup

Subject: Processors | July 31, 2017 - 03:18 PM |
Tagged: vega 64, vega 56, vega 10, Vega, radeon, amd, X399, Threadripper, ryzen, 1950x, 1920x, 1900x

Just in case you wanted to relive this weekends event, or you feel that somehow Ryan missed a detail when he was describing Threadripper or Vega, here is a roundup of other coverage of the event.  The Tech Report contrast the Vega 64 and Vega 56 with a few older NVIDIA cards as well as more modern ones, giving you a sense of the recent evolution of the GPU.  They also delve a bit into the pricing and marketing strategies which AMD has chosen, which you can check out here.

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"AMD's Radeon RX Vega graphics cards are finally here in the form of the RX Vega 64 and RX Vega 56. Join us as we see what AMD's new high-end graphics cards have in store for gamers."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

NZXT Kraken X62, X52 and X61 compatible with AMD Ryzen Threadripper

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 31, 2017 - 01:49 PM |
Tagged: nzxt, kraken, Kraken X62, Kraken X52, Kraken X61, Threadripper, amd

NZXT has announced that their three popular AiO watercoolers, the Kraken X62, Kraken X52, and Kraken X61 will be compatible with Threadripper, arriving soon to retailers.   

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NZXT has been working with AMD and created an adapter for SocketTR4 to allow you to use their cooler in your new system.  The retention clip will be supplied by AMD, in the package the new CPUs.  This is a good thing, considering the unique new way in which you install Threadripper processors.  If you haven't seen the video demonstrating the installation process you can see it below.

 

Source: NZXT

Flashback!

Subject: General Tech | July 31, 2017 - 01:11 PM |
Tagged: flash, Adobe, bad idea, open source

Just when you thought it was safe, there is a group who are attempting to ensure that Adobe Flash never dies, just like the killer from a horror movie in the 80's and 90's.  These poor misguided fools feel that by making Flash open source, the community will be able to salve the open sores which Flash is covered in.  If you can pass a sanity check, you might wonder why anyone would want to keep this application alive.  It would seem that the developer who started this petition on GitHub because "Flash is an important piece of Internet history and killing Flash means future generations can't access the past,".  One could make the same argument about Geocities and sound roughly as coherent.  You can pop over to The Inquirer for a name, as well as a link to the petition.

Capture.PNG

"A LOYAL but misguided fool has started a petition in the hope of convincing Adobe to take Flash's source code into the open source."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Inquirer

ASUS Announces Four RX Vega 64 GPUs Headlined By ROG STRIX RX Vega 64 OC Edition

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 30, 2017 - 11:02 PM |
Tagged: vega 64, strix, radeon rx vega, ASUS ROG, asus, amd

Although AMD’s own cards are the focus of attention this weekend, the company’s partners are also ready with some RX Vega announcements of their own. ASUS today announced four new cards based on the highest-tier Vega 64 design:

  • ASUS RX Vega64 Water Cooled Edition
  • ASUS RX Vega64 Air Cooled Edition
  • ROG Strix RX Vega64 OC Edition
  • ROG Strix RX Vega64

The first two cards, the non-Strix models, feature AMD’s corresponding reference design for the air and water-cooled models, while incorporating support for both ASUS’s GPU Tweak II software and XSplit Gamecaster.

asus-rog-strix-vega-64.jpg

The Strix models will feature a custom triple fan ASUS cooler, RGB lighting with Aura Sync support, and two “VR-friendly” HDMI ports (the reference RX Vega design only has one). ASUS has yet to announce base or boost clocks for the ROG Strix RX Vega64. See below for complete specifications:

asus-rx-vega64-specs-tbd.png

ASUS RX Vega64 Air and Water Cooled editions will launch on August 14th. ASUS states “early September” availability for the ROG Strix models. Pricing was not disclosed as of the date of this article’s publication.

Source: ASUS

AMD Outs Threadripper 1900X, 8-cores for $549, Details Availability and Preorders

Subject: Processors | July 30, 2017 - 10:30 PM |
Tagged: X399, Threadripper, ryzen, amd, 1950x, 1920x, 1900x

At SIGGRAPH in Los Angeles this week, AMD released even more details about the its upcoming Ryzen Threadripper product family ahead of its retail release in August. Though readers of PC Perspective are already well aware of the Threadripper 1950X and 1920X CPUs that were announced just a couple of weeks back, along with prices, clock speeds, performance estimates, and more. At tonight’s Capsaicin event, we learned about the on-sale, preorder date, and even a surprise new SKU option.

  i9-7980XE i9-7960X i9-7940X i9-7920X i9-7900X  i7-7820X i7-7800X TR 1950X TR 1920X TR 1900X
Architecture Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Skylake-X Zen Zen Zen
Process Tech 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm+ 14nm 14nm 14nm
Cores/Threads 18/36 16/32 14/28 12/24 10/20 8/16 6/12 16/32 12/24 8/16
Base Clock ? ? ? ? 3.3 GHz 3.6 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.4 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.8 GHz
Turbo Boost 2.0 ? ? ? ? 4.3 GHz 4.3 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz
Turbo Boost Max 3.0 ? ? ? ? 4.5 GHz 4.5 GHz N/A N/A N/A N/A
Cache 16.5MB (?) 16.5MB (?) 16.5MB (?) 16.5MB (?) 13.75MB 11MB 8.25MB 40MB ? ?
Memory Support ? ? ? ? DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666 Quad Channel DDR4-2666 Quad Channel
PCIe Lanes ? ? ? ? 44 28 28 64 64 64
TDP 165 watts (?) 165 watts (?) 165 watts (?) 165 watts (?) 140 watts 140 watts 140 watts 180 watts 180 watts 180 watts?
Socket 2066 2066 2066 2066 2066 2066 2066 TR4 TR4 TR4
Price $1999 $1699 $1399 $1199 $999 $599 $389 $999 $799 $549

 

  TR 1950X TR 1920X TR 1900X Ryzen 7 1800X Ryzen 7 1700X Ryzen 7 1700 Ryzen 5 1600X Ryzen 5 1600 Ryzen 5 1500X Ryzen 5 1400
Architecture Zen Zen Zen Zen Zen Zen Zen Zen Zen Zen
Process Tech 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm 14nm
Cores/Threads 16/32 12/24 8/16 8/16 8/16 8/16 6/12 6/12 4/8 4/8
Base Clock 3.4 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.8 GHz 3.6 GHz 3.4 GHz 3.0 GHz 3.6 GHz 3.2 GHz 3.5 GHz 3.2 GHz
Turbo/Boost Clock 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz 4.0 GHz 3.8  GHz 3.7 GHz 4.0 GHz 3.6  GHz 3.7 GHz 3.4 GHz
Cache 40MB ? ? 20MB 20MB 20MB 16MB 16MB 16MB 8MB
Memory Support DDR4-2666
Quad Channel
DDR4-2666 Quad Channel DDR4-2666 Quad Channel DDR4-2400
Dual Channel
DDR4-2400
Dual Channel
DDR4-2400
Dual Channel
DDR4-2400
Dual Channel
DDR4-2400
Dual Channel
DDR4-2400
Dual Channel
DDR4-2400
PCIe Lanes 64 64 64 20 20 20 20 20 20 20
TDP 180 watts 180 watts 180 watts? 95 watts 95 watts 65 watts 95 watts 65 watts 65 watts 65 watts
Socket TR4 TR4 TR4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4 AM4
Price $999 $799 $549 $499 $399 $329 $249 $219 $189 $169

Let’s not bury the lead here: the Ryzen Threadripper 1900X is the third entrant into the Threadripper family and will consist of 8-cores, 16-threads, a base clock of 3.8 GHz and a Turbo clock of 4.0 GHz, while still supporting XFR for as much as 200 MHz of additional clock speed. It will still have 64 lanes of PCI Express, four channels of DDR4 memory support, and will come with a price tag of $549.

tr-15.jpg

The 1900X becomes a very interesting part for a number of reasons. Its price puts it between the Core i7-7820X and the 7800X (8-core and 6-core parts from Intel’s Skylake-X family). Even with a base clock speed of 3.8 GHz it will find itself slower than the 7820X due to lower IPC and similar clock rates. However, AMD is counting on the appeal of 64 lanes of PCIe, countering the 28 lanes on the 7820X from Intel, along with a slight cost advantage, to help it shine. The 1900X will have the same core and thread count as the Ryzen 7 family, though at higher clock speeds, a higher TDP and double the DDR4 memory channels and more than 2x the PCIe lanes. For just $50-100 more, the 1900X is a compelling option against the 1800X if you are a connectivity, storage, or multi-GPU junkie.

Continue reading about the newly announced Ryzen Threadripper 1900X!!

Source: AMD

Looks Like Vega Nano is GO!

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 30, 2017 - 10:07 PM |
Tagged: Vega, Siggraph, Nano

This doesn't look like it was really meant to happen, but it is in the wild now!  Twitter user Drew has posted a picture of Chris Hook holding up a Vega Nano card outside the show.  It draws its design from the previous Vega products that we have seen with the shroud and the red cube in the top right corner.  No specifications were included with this post, but we can see that the card is significantly shorter than the RX Vega FE that Ryan had reviewed.

vega_hook.jpg

TDPs should be in the sub-200 watt range for such a design.  The original Nano was a 150 watt TDP part that performed quite well at the time.  Pricing is again not included, but we will be able to guess once the rest of the Vega lineup is announced later.

Source: Twitter

Alien organics displaying on scan! Alienware's 13 R3 gaming laptop

Subject: Mobile | July 28, 2017 - 03:10 PM |
Tagged: alienware, Alienware 13 R3, oled, 1440p, gtx 1060, Tobii

Alienware is continuing to provide impressive hardware in their high end laptops, along with a price tag to match.  The new R3 model contains impressive hardware, a Core i7-7700HQ, 16GB DDR4-2400MHz, a GTX 1060 and a 256GB Toshiba XG3 NVMe.  Those components are not what makes this laptop stand out however, it is the 1440p OLED touch screen and Tobii Aware eye tracking software which make this laptop interesting.  Kitguru did have some issues with the screen brightness adjusting during usage however "the OLED screen is absolutely amazing."  Check out the review but remember, if you have to ask you can't afford it.

Alienware-13-R3-Review-on-KitGuru-Open-Right-34.jpg

"Thankfully the review sample we were sent by Alienware is the Big Kahuna with the OLED screen and a mighty QHD resolution of 2,560×1,440 which is a heck of a lot of pixels packed into a 13.3-inch screen. The screen brightness is 400 nits and it has touch control."

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Source: Kitguru

Conduct Psychic Warfare with MSI's new gaming mice

Subject: General Tech | July 28, 2017 - 01:12 PM |
Tagged: msi, clutch, Clutch GM60, Clutch GM70, gaming mouse, wireless mouse, ambidextrous

MSI's Clutch GM 60 and Clutch GM70 gaming mice are almost twins, the difference being the GM70's support for wireless usage and a slight weight gain thanks to the required hardware.  Both of these mice are somewhat modifiable, you can switch out the wings as well as a portion of top shell; they are also symmetrical so can be used in either hand comfortably.  The mice contain a PMW 3360 optical sensor with sensitivity adjustable between 1000-3600 Hz in 100Hz steps.  Neoseeker tested out the performance of the mice for gaming and as a source for a funky light show in their recent review.

13.jpg

"The Clutch GM 60 and Clutch GM70 gaming mice are essentially the same mouse design, with the GM70 model being a few grams heavier when calculating the added internal wireless hardware. Both mice come with two sets of side grips to allow the user to configure their mouse choice to fit their hand with a "dragon scale" pattern on the sides to facilitate a firm grip, improving movement precision during use."

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Source: Neoseeker