Driver IRQL not less or equal, please schedule a patch at your local car dealership

Subject: General Tech | July 5, 2018 - 01:15 PM |
Tagged: security

Chris Roberts, who's claims to fame include taking over the thrust control of an airplane via the in flight entertainment system, spoke at length about the lack of security on less expensive vehicles.  With the electronics of cars and trucks becoming more and more complex and interactive, new threats are appearing almost daily and almost nothing is being done about it.  Car manufacturers will need to set up a method to update the software running on their vehicles, especially considering the fact that current laws make it illegal for owners to install patches on their own. 

The terrifying part is that he told The Register that the automobile industry is far ahead of all other transportation industries; apart from Tesla, the last newsworthy software update involved fudged emissions, not security enhancements.

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"I put a network sniffer on the big truck to see what it was sharing. Holy crap! The GPS, the telemetry, the tracking. There's a lot of data this thing is sharing."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

ASRock's X470 Taichi Ultimate power up and test

Subject: Motherboards | July 4, 2018 - 05:22 PM |
Tagged: asrock, X470 Taichi Ultimate, x470, amd, ryzen 2

The new generation of AMD boards feature some interesting aesthetic choices, such you can see on ASRock's X470 Taichi Ultimate.  The black and grey theme is contrasted by the RGBs you already knew were present, but it is worth noting that TechPowerUp considered the implementation of the blinken lighten as exceptional.  Sadly the same could not be said of the audio chipset on the board, which they found lacklustre for a flagship model.  Their overclocking tests showed no deficiencies, the boards ability was met or exceeded the other X470 boards they have tried.

As it is a flagship motherboard, there are quite a few features to cover in the review, which you can find here.

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"In addition to the new features brought to the X470 chipset, the Taichi Ultimate offers additional SATA ports, 10 gigabit Ethernet, and superior control in overclocking using the Hyper BCLK Engine II, just to name a few. ASRock's Taichi line of motherboards have traditionally been top performers. Can the ASRock X470 Taichi Ultimate and X470 chipset match up?"

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

 

Source: TechPowerUp

2 Crew 2 console

Subject: General Tech | July 4, 2018 - 04:58 PM |
Tagged: gaming, consolitis, the crew 2

The Crew 2 allows you to drive through their open world at two speeds, 30FPS or 60FPS with no way to speed that up ... yet.  Thankfully this consolitis has not infected the resolution, with 4k playable on a GTX 1080 Ti or if you are in 1440p a Vega 56 or GTX 1070 will let you redline all the graphical bells and whistles.  The graphics settings do make this game quite pretty, with some caveats that [H]ard|OCP describes in their conclusions.   The inherited technical deficiencies aside, the ability to drive around the continental USA means there is a bit more to this game than they have been able to discover in the limited time they had. 

If this is your kind of game, grab a steering wheel and fire it up. 

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"We’ve got early access to The Crew 2 thanks to the Gold Edition, a brand new open-world racing game for the PC. Let’s find out how The Crew 2 performs on today’s GPUs in this preview. We also look at graphics settings and hit a little on Image Quality. Hopefully we will have some insight as we know a lot of readers have been waiting for this game."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Intel's cup of hot Coffee has sprung a leak

Subject: General Tech | July 4, 2018 - 01:32 PM |
Tagged: coffee lake refresh, i5-9600K, i3-9000, 14nm

Today's Intel leak is a little less of a rumour than the AMD GPUs of yesterday as Intel accidentally published the model information themselves.  The process node, price and any release dates are speculation but we do have specs on two 9th generation Core processors.  The i5-9600K will be a six core, six thread CPU with top clock of 4.5GHz, 9MB of L3 cache and a 95W TDP.  The other model revealed is the i3-9000 will have four 3.7GHz cores with 4 threads, 6MB of L3 cache and a 65W TDP.   These Coffee Lake Refresh chips will a tough time on the market as AMD offers higher thread counts, albeit at a lower frequency. 

Things are getting very interesting in the CPU world; The Inquirer has links if you want to dig.

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"The document appears to have now been updated to strip out mention of the 9th-gen processors, but PC Gamer reports that a separate PDF was also posted online - though it now results in a page missing error - that listed some of the specs of the incoming chips."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Sapphire Shows Off New 5x5 Ryzen V1000 Platform for Embedded Systems

Subject: General Tech | July 3, 2018 - 05:55 PM |
Tagged: SoC, SFF, sapphire, ryzen v1000, ryzen embedded, ryzen, APU, amd

Sapphire Technologies is now partnering with AMD to offer up a new small(ish) 5"x5" form factor system for embedded applications featuring AMD's Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC APUs. The Sapphire FS-FP5V is a 5.8"x5.5" motherboard that pairs the V1000 SoC with Zen CPU cores and Vega GPU with dual channel DDR4 3200 MHz SODIMM memory slots, two M.2 slots, a single SATA 3 port, dual Ethernet, and four DisplayPort outputs supporting up to four 4K displays.

Sapphire 5x5 Ryzen V1000.jpg

The 5x5 motherboard uses a V1000 APU that is soldered to the board though the website does not specify which model Sapphire is using. The V1000 series includes APUs ranging from 12W to 54W with up to four (Zen) cores / 8 threads, a Vega-based GPU with up to 11 CUs, 2MB L2 cache, and 4MB shared L3 cache. The SoC further has AMD's PSP security processor and support for dual 10GbE though Sapphire's board only uses two Gigabit NICs (Realtek RTL8111G). Realtek chips are also used for the four channel audio solution (ALC262). The M.2 2280 can operate in PCI-E 3.0 x4 or SATA modes while the smaller M.2 2242 slot uses PCI-E x1 and can accommodate Wi-Fi cards or smaller SSDs. The FS-FP5V board also features serial RS232 and GPIO support and the motherboard is powered by a single 19V DC input.

Rear I/O includes two USB 2.0 ports (there's also one on the front), one USB 3.1 Type-C, four DisplayPort outputs, two RJ-45 GbE jacks, and a single audio output.

Sapphire plans to sell its new 5x5 board to system integrators as well as directly through their website. A video from AMD shows off the board as well as examples from Sapphire partners of SFF cases and 2x2 display walls. The new platform is aimed at video gaming systems (think casinos, arcades, and video gambling machines in bars), digital signage, large display walls, point of sale systems, and medical imaging (high resolution display outputs for medical scanning and diagnostics devices). There is no word on pricing or availability, but if you are interested there is a form you can fill out to get more information. It is nice to see AMD getting some design wins in the SFF space even if its not in consumer products yet (it's time for an AMD NUC competitor).

Update: Tom's Hardware managed to get their hands on some pricing details which show Sapphire will offer four models that vary by Ryzen Embedded processor used including:

  • Ryzen Embedded V1202B (2 core / 4 thread + Vega 3)  for $325
  • Ryzen Embedded V1605B (4 core / 8 thread + Vega 8) for $340
  • Ryzen Embedded V1756B (4 core / 8 thread + Vega 8) for $390
  • Ryzen Embedded V1807B (4 core / 8 thread + Vega 11) for $450

The first two options are 12W to 25W TDP SoCs while the latter two are 35W to 54W processors. The V1202B is clocked at 2 GHz base and up to 3.6 GHz. Moving up to the V1605B gets two more cores at an every so slightly higher 2.06 GHz base and moves from Vega 3 to Vega 8 graphics (though still at the same 1,100 MHz clockspeeds). Stepping up to the V1756B gets a processor with a much higher 3.25 GHz base but hte same maximum boost and graphics as the V1605B. Finally, moving to the flagship V1807B SoC gets an APU clocked at 3.35 GHz base and 3.8 GHz boost with Vega 11 graphics clocked at 1,300 MHz. The boards will reportedly be available later this year (relatively soon) while the UDOO Bolt will be available next year at similar price points. In all the Sapphire board seems like a decent deal for setting up a homelab or media box (though I wish the storage situation was better) while the UDOO Bolt board is aimed more at developers and makers with the inclusion of Aruino pinouts and eMMC storage (The UDOO appears to top out at the V1605B chip as well.)

(End of Update.)

Also read:

Source: AMD

Are you a fan of tan? Noctua's new Sterrox lineup

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 3, 2018 - 03:08 PM |
Tagged: sterrox, noctua, NF-P12 redux, NF-A12

One of these two new fans from Noctua are constructed of Sterrox, which we have seen a fair amount of advertising for recently.  According to the PR, the new material should allow for tighter spacing between the fan blades and the frame of the fan; these feature a minuscule 0.5mm of clearance compared to the common gap of 1.5-3mm.   The Guru of 3D pulled out their anemometer to see if this design has any effect on airflow and in the case of the NF-A12, how the PWM, FLX and ultra low noise adapters change performance and acoustics.  Take a look through the full review to get your answers.

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"Especially our fans and your fans, a review on that new Sterrox based Noctua fan. Well, that and many more newly released ones. Noctua recently released new Sterrox manufactured 120mm fans in a wide range of configurations. The NF-A12 series, however, has been a fan series they worked on for four years! In this group test, we'll put nine recent Noctua fans to the test, and compared them in cooling performance, noise levels and airflow."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Guru of 3D

Cooler Master Releases the MasterCase H500

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 3, 2018 - 02:26 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, MasterCase H500, atx

Cooler Master have added a new case to the MasterCase family, the simple and clean H500.  They did not remove any major functionality, simply cut down on some of the extras that many do not want as well as reducing the price to $100.  

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The case ships with two front panels, one made of mesh and the other completely transparent so you can pick which will frame the pair of 200mm RGB fans installed on the front.  The top features a grill, magnetically attached and easy to remove which guards your cooling solution up top, either a pair of 120 or140mm coolers or a single 200mm fan.   If you prefer watercooling, the front can handle a radiator of up to 360mm, the top a 240mm rad and there is room on the back for a 120mm fan or AiO watercooler exhaust. 

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The case is 525x228x502mm (20.7x9x19.8") and is able to handle ATX, Micro-ATX or Mini-ITX motherboards, and a GPU of 16" in length.  Of course, it does come with an RGB controller to keep the addicts happy.

LOS ANGELES, CALIF., JULY 3, 2018– Cooler Master, and award winning computer hardware and gaming peripherals manufacturer, today announced the release of the MasterCase H500, further expanding the H-Series known for its two iconic, 200mm fans.

The MasterCase H500 is the latest case released within the H-Series. In comparison to its predecessors, the MasterCase H500M and H500P, the MasterCase H500 is more simplistic in options and modularity, but retains the essential H-Series characteristics. For gamers that prefer mesh, added portability, and a straightforward building experience, the MasterCase H500 offers an alternative that still keeps the series’ essential features.

For a choice between maximum airflow and aesthetics, the MasterCase H500 comes with both mesh and transparent acrylic front panel attachments. Users can easily swap between the two by removing the front panel and changing the insert. Management of the two 200mm RGB fans is made possible via included controller that can also be connected directly to the reset switch to cycle through pre-set lighting modes.

The top panel of the MasterCase H500 is capable of housing an additional, optional, 200mm fan, up to 280mm radiator and a 360mm radiator in the front. In true form, the H500 also offers support for a clean build with added front cable cover and PSU cover for easy cable management. In addition, Cooler Master simplified the top panel of the H500 by replacing the traditional structured bar design with a simple magnetic dust filter.

The updated tempered glass side panel of the H500 is fastened by two, captive thumb screws that are held in place with rubber grommets to prevent users from misplacing their screws when removed.

Friction mounts for the SSD can be found behind the motherboard. Without tools, four pegs are installed on the SSD and simply placed into the rubber holes, this will secure the SSD to prevent it from moving. A subtle handle placed on the top panel has been added to the H500 for ease of transportation. For more information about the MasterCase H500, please visit our website HERE.

Pricing & Availability
The MasterCase H500 is available for pre-sale, today, at a starting MSRP of $99.99 on Newegg.

AMD's North Star might arrive in time to top Christmas trees around the world

Subject: General Tech | July 3, 2018 - 12:50 PM |
Tagged: rumour, Polaris, navi, amd

The rumour around the 'net today concerns AMD's new generation of GPUs, the 12nm Polaris 30 update and the 7nm Navi chip.  If these rumours are correct, we will see Polaris before the end of the year and it will come with a performance boost of 20% compared to the current Polaris 20 based cards.  It will be very interesting to see how they match up to Vega, both in price as well as performance; not to mention how much they narrow the gap between their cards and NVIDIAs.  Navi will initially be for mid-range GPU applications, likely to make AMD some good income from next generation consoles and eventually paired with HBM2 to replace Vega on the high end. 

You can track the rumours back to their source at The Inquirer.

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"The post notes that Polaris 30 will be manufactured using the 12-nanometre finFET process and will offer a 20 per cent boost in performance over the Polaris 20-based high-end GPUs that debuted in 2017."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Blender 2.8 Expected Release Schedule Published

Subject: General Tech | July 2, 2018 - 04:59 PM |
Tagged: Blender

The next dot-version of Blender, 2.8, is the most exciting update (in my opinion) since BMesh (n-gons) was added in 2.63. It is focused on workflow patterns and interface changes, but this involves several secondary changes. First, the minimum OpenGL version of the viewport renderer has been bumped to 3.3, which targets DirectX 10 hardware. (Previously, Blender required OpenGL 2.1.) The method for storing objects in the scene will also change. In short, it’s a huge update, both visibly and behind-the-scenes.

Here's Blender Today doing a live stream about Blender 2.8 Alpha

And now the Blender Foundation has published its expected release schedule.

First up is the alpha release – Today!

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Blender 2.8’s alpha is still not useful for production content, and it’s even too early for add-on developers to update (because the Python API will change). After playing around with it for a few minutes, I’m admittedly confused with some parts. For instance, is OpenGL Render Image / Animation going to stick around? If so, what does it mean compared to clicking Render Image when Eevee is selected. For the moment, Blender’s bug tracker is only interested in crash bugs. You cannot report anything other than crashes.

After the alpha will be the beta – around August 12th.

Blender 2.8’s beta will still not be ready for add-on developers to update their plug-ins. Instead, this will align with merging the 2.8 branch into master, updating the release notes, and opening up the bug tracker to non-crash-related reports. All features are expected to be finished by then, and development will work on fixing bugs.

After the beta will be a Python API finalized – around September 19th (give or take).

When this date occurs, Blender will communicate to add-on developers that it is safe to update their plug-ins to Blender 2.8. It looks like this is to give them a little time to focus on API-breaking bugs that appear in the beta phase, fixing them first so add-on developers can get to work while the Blender Foundation focuses on bugs that do not affect the API. They will give add-on developers at least a month before RC is called.

Which brings us to release candidate – around October 20th.

The Blender Conference 2018 event will take place from the 25th, 26th, and 27th of October, so I’m guessing that they want to get the release candidate out in time for then. This should hopefully mean that the whole update arrives before the end of 2018.

As always, Blender completely free, even for commercial use, as licensed under the GPL.

SD Association Unleashes SD 7.0 Specification With Massive Speed and Capacity Increases

Subject: General Tech | July 2, 2018 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged:

The SD Association recently took the wraps off of its latest SD 7.0 specification for SD cards which brings huge increases in potential capacities and data transfer speeds with the introduction of SD Ultra Capacity (SDUC) and integration of PCI-E and NVMe technologies for SD Express respectively. Teaming up with PCI-SIG (the group behind the PCI/e specifications), future SD cards will be available as SDUC or SD Express or both (cards can be SDUC but not SD Express and vice versa). The SD Ultra Capacity specification boosts the capacity limit from 2 TB (SDXC) to 128 TB while SD Express repurposes the second row of pins in UHS II cards to support a PCI-E 3.0 x1 connection along with NVMe 1.3 interface and its SSD-friendly features like bus mastering, multi queue (sans locking), Host Memory Buffer, NVMe power control, and other memory access mechanisms. The PCI-E interface enables up to 985 MB/s transfers for SD Express compatible hosts while retaining backwards compatibility (at slower speeds over the SD interface) with other/older hosts.

SD Express Combines PCI-E NVMe WIth SD.png

SDUC cards will be available in micro SD and SD flavors while SD Express will be available initially in full size SDHC, SDXC, and SDUC cards (denoted with a new EX I suffix). SD 7.0 specifies SD cards using two power supplies (3.3v and 1.8v) with pin #18 on the second row being reserved for a future 1.2v supply for lower power cards/modes. SD Express cards can be initialized by the host using either SD or PCI-E interfaces, though using the legacy SD interface is recommended. When operating in PCI-E / NVMe mode, the card using standard NVMe drivers and shows up as a typical NVMe device to Windows. The new interface supports most SD card features such as password locking and write protection, but SD-CPRM Security (the DRM used on SD cards) and speed classes do not work over the PCI-E interface.

Because SD Express uses the second row of pins that are used in current UHS-II cards, SD Express cards will not be able to operate in UHS-II mode on UHS-II hosts. UHS-I remains unaffected, however.

SD Association SD 7 Specification Performance Chart.png

In all the new specification sounds great and will help future SD cards remain relevant in mobile devices as well as high end professional and consumer video equipment especially as the industry moves towards 8K and beyond for production and consumers are recording and watching more 4K+ high bit-rate content than ever before. The PCi-E 3.0 and NVMe 1.3 interfaces (up to 985 MB/s) should provide competition for high end video cameras like those from RED that use removeable solid state drives with similar speed feats in a smaller form factor. The SD Association further mentions applications in automotive and VR applications for SD Express.

There are still questions as far as how much the hardware (PHY and NVMe controller) needed to enable SD Express will add to the cost of SD cards and how long it will be until cards with limited numbers of flash can actually start to approach those maximum data transfer speeds and capacities.

If you are curious about SD 7.0, you can find the whitepaper [PDF] as well as a video on SD Express on the SD Association’s website.

HTC Launches VIVE Pro Full Kit, Shipping Today for $1400

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 2, 2018 - 01:08 PM |
Tagged: vive pro, steamvr, oculus rift, Oculus, htc

Although the HTC Vive Pro has been available in headset only form as an upgrade for previous VIVE owners for several months, there has been a lack of a full solution for customers looking to enter the ecosystem from scratch.

Today, HTC announced immediate availability for their full VIVE Pro kit featuring Steam VR 2.0 Base Stations and the latest revision of the HTC Vive Controllers.

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For those who need a refresher, the HTC Vive Pro improves upon the original Vive VR Headset with 78% improved resolution (2880x1600), as well as a built-in deluxe audio strap.

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New with the HTC Vive Pro Full Kit, the Steam VR 2.0 Base Station trackers allow users to add up to 4 base stations (previously limited to 2), for a wider area up to 10x10 meters (32x32 feet), as well as improved positional tracking.

It's worth noting that this kit does not include the upcoming next generation of Steam VR controllers codenamed "Knuckles," which likely won't be available until 2019.

The HTC Vive Pro Full Kit is now available from several retailers including Amazon and B&H Photo for a price of $1400.

Given the steep asking price and "Pro" moniker, it remains clear here that HTC is only attempting to target very high-end gaming enthusiasts and professionals with this headset, rather than the more general audience the original Vive targets. As of now, it's expected that the original VIVE will continue to be available as a lower cost alternative.

Source: Amazon

Summer Games Done Quick 2018 Wraps at $2.1 Million USD

Subject: General Tech | July 1, 2018 - 11:03 PM |
Tagged: speedrun, gdq, charity, pc gaming

While there are still a few late donations coming in, the Summer Games Done Quick 2018 event has ended with a seven-hour run of Final Fantasy VI… and $2.1 million USD. This donation amount ranks it as first place of all Summer Games Done Quick events by almost $400,000 dollars (and third place of all Games Done Quick events).

gdq-2016-sgdq logo.png

Its last day, however, did not break $1 million dollars, unlike what we’ve seen in Awesome Games Done Quick. I was expecting, assuming it would have a similar last day, that SGDQ 2018 to be the highest grossing of all events when I went to bed on Friday night / Saturday morning, but it didn’t. I don’t know why. The line-up seemed good, especially with the Super Mario Odyssey donation incentive being met, but it brought in just a little less by the end.

(It’s possible that they calculate their values slightly lower this year, because they kept saying that the donation total doesn’t include their sponsors at the end, but I don’t think that’s the case.)

Even though its last day was slightly low, relative to previous years, breaking $2 million USD is still amazing for Doctors Without Borders. I was out of town for much of the event, but, if I were to pick a highlight from what I’ve seen, it would probably be the TAS block at the end of the second-last day. The tool-assisted runs were interesting, and the creative segment involved taking over F-Zero GX to connect with a Gameboy Advance and play a 3D cutscene via zero-day exploits. It’s worth checking out when it comes out on their YouTube channel if you missed it live.

The next event will be Games Done Quick Express in October (during TwitchCon). Awesome Games Done Quick 2019 will follow on January 6th – 13th in Rockville, Maryland.

If you cannot wait that long, then you can check out ESA Summer, from the European Speedrunner Assembly, running from July 21st at 10am (North American EDT) through some time in the afternoon or evening (North American EDT) of July 28th. It's run by a different organization, but it's a similar blend of fast video games and charity donations.

A shiny new tablet from Acer, the Chromebook Tab 10

Subject: Mobile | June 29, 2018 - 06:34 PM |
Tagged: Chromebook, acer, tablet, chrome os, Tab 10

Featuring a 9.7" 2048×1536 IPS touchscreen powered by a Mali T860, an OP1 which is a dual-core Cortex A72 and quad-core Cortex A53 with 4GB LPDDR3 and 34GB of local storage the $330 Acer Tab 10 sounds quite interesting.  The performance of the OP1 chip falls behind the pack, falling behind even the Tab S3 however this extends the battery life, Ars Technica saw it last 651 minutes in their WiFi test.   Along with the tablet you get a Wacom stylus, which is effective for note taking and simple sketches, though the tablet does not offer real time writing to text which could be a turn off.  Also worth mentioning is the USB-C 3.1 Gen 1 port that charges the tablet but can also be used for data transfer or connecting to an external monitor.

It might not be great for architects and artists but for a student this might be a great low cost mobile tool.

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"Chrome OS took over schools with clamshells, but now Google is shaking things up with slabs. After a spring announcement, Acer has built the first Chrome OS tablet, the $329 Chromebook Tab 10, to give teachers and students a more flexible device to use for schoolwork both in and out of the classroom."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

More Mobile Articles

 

Source: Ars Technica

Biostar Announces Budget M500 NVMe SSDs

Subject: Storage | June 29, 2018 - 06:14 PM |
Tagged: tlc, ssd, NVMe, biostar, 3d nand

Motherboard manufacturer Biostar is expanding its solid state drive lineup with the launch of the M500 M.2 2280 SSD which appears to be the company’s first PCI-E NVMe SSD (it is not the first M.2 but those drives used SATA). The new Biostar M500 SSD uses 3D TLC NAND flash and supports NVMe 1.2 protocol and the PCI-E x2 interface. The exact controller and flash chips used have not yet been revealed, however.

Biostar M500 PCI-E NVMe SSD.jpg

Biostar continues its gamer / racing aesthetics with the new drive featuring a black heatsink with two LEDs that serve a utilitarian purpose. One LED shows the temperature of thebdrive at a glance (red/yellow/green) while the other LED shows data transmit activity and also shows which PCi-E mode (2.0 / 3.0) the drive is in.

The M500 SSD uses up to 1.7W while reading. it comes in four SKUs including 128 GB, 256 GB, 512 GB, and 1TB capacities with either 256 MB. 512 MB, or 1 GB of DDR3L cache respectively.

As far as performance is concerned, Biostar claims up to 1,700 MB/s sequential reads and 1,100 MB/s sequential writes. Further, the drives offer up to 200K random read IOPS and 180K random write IOPS. Of course, these numbers are for the top end 512 GB and 1 TB drives and the lower capacity models will have less performance as they have less cache and flash channels to spread reads and writes from/to.

SSD Capacity Max Sequential Read Max Sequential Write Read IOPS Write IOPS Price
128 GB 1,500 MB/s 550 MB/s 200K 180K $59
256 GB 1,600 MB/s 900 MB/s 200K 180K $99
512 GB 1,700 MB/s 1,100 MB/s 200K 180K $149
1 TB 1,700 MB/s 1,100 MB/s 200K 180K $269

According to Guru3D, Biostar’s M500 M.2 drives will be available soon with MSRP prices of $59 for the 128 GB model, $99 for the 256 GB model, $149 for the 512 GB drive, and $269 for the 1 TB SKU. The pricing does not seem terrible though the x2 interface does limit its potential / usefulness. They are squarely budget SSDs aimed at computing with SATA SSDs and enticing upgrades from mechanical drives. They may be useful for upgrading older laptops where a x4 M.2 slot would not be wasted like on a desktop machine.

What do you think about Biostar’s foray into NVMe solid state drives?

Source: Guru3D

Notice a big data bill and a bunch of the photos on your Samsung device are now all over the internet?

Subject: General Tech | June 29, 2018 - 04:31 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, samsung messenger, oops

The newer models of Samsung mobile devices feature an interesting ability, they can send your entire gallery of pictures to contacts on your Samsung Messenger app, without your knowledge or consent.  Samsung has yet to admit there is an error, let alone release a fix for this new feature but The Inquirer offers you a workaround.  In the settings of your Samsung Messenger app, disable the apps ability to access your phone's storage; this will prevent you from sending pictures you intended to send but it is probably best for everyone if you do this until a fix is release.

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"The Samsung Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+ and Note 8 have all shown evidence of the glitch, which is causing the Samsung Messages app to send photos - sometimes one, sometimes the entire ruddy gallery - on, sometimes before you've even noticed it's happening."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

PCPer Mailbag #50 - 6/29/2018

Subject: Editorial | June 29, 2018 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: video, Ryan Shrout, pcper mailbag

It's time for the PCPer Mailbag, our weekly show where Ryan and the team answer your questions about the tech industry, the latest and greatest GPUs, the process of running a tech review website, and more!

On today's show:

01:06 - Intel vs. AMD in 2019?
05:04 - Reliability of CPU and GPU silicon?
06:33 - Cases with 5.25-inch bays?
09:12 - 2K vs. 4K textures in games?
11:06 - Using an old m.2 SATA SSD in a desktop?
13:00 - NVIDIA NDAs?
17:51 - ThinkPads used during podcast?

Want to have your question answered on a future Mailbag? Leave a comment on this post or in the YouTube comments for the latest video. Check out new Mailbag videos each Friday!

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel to make sure you never miss our weekly reviews and podcasts, and please consider supporting PC Perspective via Patreon to help us keep videos like our weekly mailbag coming!

Source: YouTube

Podcast #505 - ASUS G-SYNC HDR, Logitech G305, and more!

Subject: General Tech | June 28, 2018 - 02:31 PM |
Tagged: video, thermaltake, qualcomm, podcast, PG27UQ, nvidia, micron, K70, Intel, gddr6, g-sync, Elgato, corsair, asus

PC Perspective Podcast #505 - 06/28/18

Join us this week for discussion on ASUS G-SYNC HDR, Logitech G305, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:26:36

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. Ryan:
  4. Closing/outro
 
Source:

Threadripper 2990X rumours come with good and bad news

Subject: General Tech | June 28, 2018 - 01:45 PM |
Tagged: amd, rumour, Threadripper, 2990X

A German retailer jumped the gun and posted a price for the mysterious new 2990X processor whose existence AMD has yet to confirm or deny.  At around $1750 USD, converting from the posted €1,509 it would be significantly more expensive than the current 1950X but lower than the $2000 price tag attached to Intel's Core i9-7980XE.   The price will likely actually be lower in North America as prices depend on a variety of geographically dependent charges, though it will still be a fair chunk of change.  The 32 core chip is likely clocked at 3.4GHz base with a boost of 4GHz and will surpass Intel's unreleased 28 core chip in a variety of tasks and leave the i9-7980XE in the dirt with applications which prefer multiple threads, not to mention PCIe lanes.

The Inquirer links to the original leak here.

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"Videocardz spotted the since-removed listing at Cyperport, which listed the 32-core CPU with a €1,509 (around £1,300) price-tag, making it roughly €500 more expensive than AMD's 16-core Threadripper 1950X at launch."

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Source: The Inquirer

The view of Xen from the Source

Subject: General Tech | June 27, 2018 - 04:23 PM |
Tagged: gaming, half life, black mesa, mod, source engine

The strange story of Black Mesa continues, with over half of the Xen levels now completed.  The port of Half Life 1 to the Source engine was first announced over a decade ago and was finally release, as a free mod, in 2012.  The initial release ended before the Xen levels and did not require you to own any of the previous games.  The project expanded into Crowbar Collective and not too long ago they switched from a free game to launch a Steam pre-order/early access version which cost actual money.  This decision upset some, while others hoped it meant that Black Mesa would get even better.    The Xen levels are now approaching completion and the games tentative 2018 release is drawing close.

You can grab the game from Steam, where it is currently 60% off thanks to the current sale or you can just read about it over at Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN and consider leaving nasty notes about Crowbar Collective's actions over the past 10+ years.

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"Of the five chapters that make up the Xen part of the game, two are in the final spit n’ polish phase, two are in the late stages of development, mostly just needing art assets created and installed onto the map framework, and one chapter, Interloper, is being saved for last, with the entire team planning on finishing it up as their final piece of work on the game."

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Laptop vendors are left sitting on the sidelines waiting for the next waltz to start

Subject: General Tech | June 27, 2018 - 02:34 PM |
Tagged: hp, dell, Lenovo, acer, asus, Intel

Intel's delayed release of a new processor is going to have a noticeable effect on the laptop market this year.  As there is little chance of seeing anything new until towards the end of this year, laptop designers will not be able to offer new models for the holidays and will instead have to rework existing products.  DigiTimes suggests we will see trimmed down models with lower price tags to try to entice consumers into purchasing something, as they expect lower demand than we saw last year.  Hopefully some gaming machines may become more affordable, or we will start to see models incorporating AMD's new chips become more common.

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"Global notebook vendors including HP, Dell, Lenovo, Acer and Asustek Computer will be unable to launch new models fitted with Intel's new-generation CPUs in the second half of 2018 as scheduled, as the release of Intel's new offerings will not come soon enough for this year's high season, according to industry sources."

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Source: DigiTimes