Meet the i9-9980XE

Subject: Processors | November 13, 2018 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: x299, Threadripper, skylake-x, Intel, i9-9980XE, i9-7980XE, HEDT, core x, amd, 2990wx

The new ~$2000 i9-9980XE is a refreshed Skylake chip, using Intel's 14-nm++ process, with 18 multithreaded cores running at 3GHz with a Boost clock of 4.4GHz.  If you were to lift up the lid, you would find the same Solder Thermal Interface Material we saw in the last few releases so expect some brave soul to run delidding tests at some point in the near future.  As it stands now, The Tech Report's overclocking tests had the same results as Ken, with 4.5GHz across all cores being the best they could manage.  While the chip does offer new features, many of them are aimed specifically at production tasks and will not benefit your gaming experience.

Check out the performance results here and below the fold.

 

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"Intel is bolstering its Core X high-end desktop CPUs with everything in its bag of tricks, including 14-nm++ process technology, higher clock speeds, larger caches, and solder thermal interface material. We put the Core i9-9980XE to the test to see how those refinements add up against AMD's high-end desktop onslaught."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

 

G.SKILL Announces a DDR4-4266 64GB kit as well as a DDR4-4000 128GB kit

Subject: Memory | November 13, 2018 - 02:44 PM |
Tagged: samsung b-die, G.Skill, ddr4-4266, ddr4-4000

If you like large pools of impressively fast DDR4 then check out these two new kits from G.SKILL.  The smaller of the two new kits has eight 8GB DIMMs clocked at DDR4-4266 CL19-19-19-39 @1.45V while the larger has eight 16GB DIMMs running DDR4-4000 CL19-19-19-39 @ 1.35V.

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The DIMMs have been validated on the ASUS PRIME X299-DELUXE II motherboard with the Intel Core i9-9920X and i7-9800X, and it is quite possible you will have some success getting them to work on Threadripper.  That chip won't support the top frequencies of these DIMMs but it tends to like Samsung B-Die memory so you can have fun tightening the timings or dropping the voltage.

They will support XMP 2.0 profiles if you just want to get up and running immediately, without manually tweaking your settings in the UEFI.  They will be available in the new year and while we don't have pricing information yet, you can expect a wee bit of sticker shock when they are released.

 

Source: G.Skill

Introducing the Quadro RTX 4000

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 13, 2018 - 02:14 PM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 4000, nvidia, HPC, autodesk

NVIDIA's newest Turing based HPC card the RTX 4000 has arrived, with 2304 CUDA cores, 288 Tensor Cores, 36 RT Cores, and 8GB of GDDR6 on-board GPU memory.   They haven't released any benchmarks as of yet but do state the new memory will offer a 40% increase in bandwidth compared to the previous P4000 and that the card can produce up to 57 TFLOPs of performance, one assumes this refers to INT8 performance.

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They are showing the card off at Autodesk, if you visit they have set up a demo which uses the Enscape3D plugin to let you put on a VR headset to step inside a full-scale Autodesk Revit model and make changes in real time, which would be an interesting way to work.  The card will sell for ~$900 which puts in reach of quite a few possible users and might encourage AMD to sell it's Instinct MI60 and MI50 cards for a price in that ballpark.

Check it out on NVIDIA's page here.

 

Source: NVI

A new Chromium plated web?

Subject: General Tech | November 13, 2018 - 01:05 PM |
Tagged: tcp, QUIC, http

The third iteration of the hypertext transfer protocol may be running without TCP packets interrupting those aloof UDP packets as it will be replaced by QUIC.  That protocol was designed by Google and used in their OS, in fact you can play with it on a test server if you so wish.  The idea is to replace TCP with a lower latency protocol which is built with encryption in mind, it supports the new TLS 1.3 as well as older protocols and it is able to handle HTTP/2, TCP and UDP.  You can get more information on Quick UDP Internet Connections at Slashdot as well. 

UDP may or may not have sent out a reply; it is not clear.

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"The HTTP-over-QUIC experimental protocol will be renamed to HTTP/3 and is expected to become the third official version of the HTTP protocol, officials at the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) have revealed," writes Catalin Cimpanu via ZDNet. "This will become the second Google-developed experimental technology to become an official HTTP protocol upgrade after Google's SPDY technology became the base of HTTP/2."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Slashdot

Final Fantasy XV Gets Reduced Ongoing Support

Subject: General Tech | November 11, 2018 - 11:28 AM |
Tagged: pc gaming, square enix, final fantasy, final fantasy xv

Square Enix has announced that plans to update Final Fantasy XV (15) are much smaller than they used to be. The game was supposed to be receive four DLC episodes, Aranea, Lunafreye, Noctis, and Ardyn, but will now only get Ardyn in March 2019; the other three are canceled for both console and PC.

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Off into the sunset...

The biggest news for PC gamers: no RTX or Vulkan support (outside that benchmark).

There is also a bit of confusing, self-contradictory discussion about the future of the co-op multiplayer expansion, Comrades. As far as I can tell, it will be split into a $10 (free if you own Final Fantasy 15) separate game on the consoles, but it will remain an in-game option on the PC.

The reason for these changes is that the game’s director, Hajime Tabata, has left the company and the studio that he made less than a year before leaving, Luminous Productions, have been reassigned to a new title within Square Enix.

Source: DSOGaming

A preliminary look at BFV performance

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 9, 2018 - 02:24 PM |
Tagged: gaming, graphics, battlefield V

Battlefield V has just dropped and we are starting to see performance results, however they will be a while in coming as EA's wonderful policy of only allowing five hardware changes before locking you out of your purchased game for 24 hours is somewhat of a hurdle.  Guru of 3D is slowly filling in benchmarks as they are able, but with the hard limit on hardware changes it will take them a while.  AMD's RX series is easily capable of 60+ fps at 1080p on Ultra settings, however for 1440p you will want at least a GTX 1070 but if you are looking for 4K you will either need to drop your quality or plug in a 1080 Ti at the very least.  They also take a look at memory usage on the last page, if you are concerned that may be a bottleneck for you.

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"In this article, we'll check out graphics cards with Battlefield V. We'll be brutally honest - the game looks great, and has been shaping up to be something pretty good in gameplay as well. We've spent a day now on the Prerelease to check out what the game offers. Battlefield V really doesn't need an introduction, it's really much like the 2016 Battlefield 1 in gameplay."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Source: Guru of 3D

14TB of secure portable spinning rust from iStorage

Subject: Storage | November 9, 2018 - 01:34 PM |
Tagged: iStorage, diskAshur, 12TB, external hdd

Not everyone needs the speed a portable SSD offers, however at $870 US the diskAshur DT2  is still a fairly large investment.  The cost is split between the Seagate IronWolf HDD and the case itself, which is fairly impressive.  The drive can be encrypted with AES-XTS 256 requiring a PIN be entered onto the numpad on the front, and supports multiple PINs so the drive can be shared with multiple users.  Inside the enclosure is a Common Criteria EAL4+ processor which offers protection against a wide variety of attacks if you happen to lose the drive and some unscrupulous person gets their hands on it.  Not only is it secure, it is the fastest external HDD Nikktech have tested.  

Drop by to take a look at a handy way to securely store a large amount of data.

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"Combining state of the art security measures with the highest available storage capacities the diskAshur DT2 Desktop Hard Drive by iStorage is the one stop to safeguarding all your sensitive data."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: Nikktech

RTX RDX; Tracing the troubles with the Ti

Subject: General Tech | November 9, 2018 - 12:53 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, RTX 2080 Ti

More evidence of issues with the Founders Edition of the RTX 2080 Ti appeared on a screen over at [H]ard|OCP while Kyle was relaxing with a little Hunt: Showdown.  Earlier hints of issues occurred, with some initial BSODs and a lacklustre overclocking experiment when trying to push the card beyond it's factory overclock.  A new driver just dropped yesterday and Kyle is going to keep testing as there are always numerous variables in these sorts of things but it is worth keeping up with.

On the plus side the crash unlocks a new colourful version of Centipede!

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"This case is not in any way running "hot" with a single RTX 2080 Ti. Even this evening I was running its two 280mm fans at high to make sure I was giving it the airflow it needed. This case has been home to dual Titan X cards, as well as Radeon 290X Crossfire, and never had an issue."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

PCPer Mailbag #60 - You Touched My Silicone Sensitive Areas

Subject: Editorial | November 9, 2018 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: video, pcper mailbag, Allyn Malventano

It's time for the PCPer Mailbag, our Q&A show where each week a member of the team answers your questions about the tech industry, the latest and greatest GPUs, the process of running a tech review website, and more!

This week Allyn's back for a variety of questions:

00:26 - Samsung has said they are going to slow down DRAM and NAND production to keep prices high. Would Samsung be able to slow production enough to stop prices for the end consumer from falling further than they already have? Bonus question, how low do you think price per gig will go on TLC and MLC?

06:06 - I am building a new home desktop/server for Emby and it needs a new HDD. What’s the most important factor to consider: amount of cache, rotational speed, or SATA type? Regarding the CPU, would a Ryzen 5 or 7 be adequate for streaming up to four videos from the server at 1080p?

12:47 - Does higher L3 cache per core increase single-threaded performance? If so, does this mean for example that the i7-8700K has faster single-threaded performance than the i5-8600K if frequency is same and hyper-threading is off?

15:48 - The Spectre/Meltdown microcode updates hit Broadwell-E processors hard in terms of performance. In Windows 10 1803 you could hide the patch (KB4100347) and everything was fine. Do you know how this will work in Windows 10 1809? Is the microcode update still something that can be skipped, or is it rolled into the 1809 update?

20:21 - Are there any CPUs available now that have hardware-based fixes for Spectre and Meltdown? If not, is there a timetable of when they may be available?

24:28 - What are considered to be “silicone sensitive areas” within a PC or laptop? I’m looking to replace the TIM on my laptop (Lenovo E585) to cut down on fan noise and I saw that as a marketing bullet on some Thermal Grizzly Hydronaut.

Want to have your question answered on a future Mailbag? Leave a comment on this post or in the YouTube comments for the latest video. Check out new Mailbag videos (usually) each week!

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel to make sure you never miss our weekly reviews and podcasts, and please consider supporting PC Perspective via Patreon to help us keep videos like our weekly mailbag coming!

Source: YouTube

The Yoga Book gets a squirt from the electronic octopus

Subject: Mobile | November 8, 2018 - 02:44 PM |
Tagged: Lenovo, yoga book 2018, e ink

Lenovo chose to use more traditional hardware for the keyboard on the new Yoga Book, E Ink instead of their previous Halo design.  This update means that screen will accept touch and pen input without needing extra steps, making it much easier to draw directly on the screen after a second or two for it to refresh to the new interface.  The lack of physical keys may be a drawback for some, Ars Technica had some issues when trying to compose lengthy texts though those used to touchscreens may never notice.  Sadly Lenovo has not included the ability to read anything but PDFs on the E Ink screen, hopefully that will change soon.

Check out the review in full here.

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"Lenovo's quirky Yoga Book is back with some significant updates for 2018. The original Yoga Book was a unique hybrid of a tablet sporting a "halo" keyboard panel with no actual keys and a real paper drawing pad. Part netbook and part convertible, this year's edition remains quirky but seems more practical and less cumbersome than the original."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

More Mobile Articles

Source: Ars Technica

Podcast #521 - Zen 2, 7nm Vega, SSD Vulnerabilities, and more!

Subject: General Tech | November 8, 2018 - 01:54 PM |
Tagged: Zen 2, xeon, Vega, rome, radeon instinct, podcast, MI60, Intel, EPYC, cxl-ap, chiplet, cascade lake, amd, 7nm

PC Perspective Podcast #521 - 11/08/18

Join us this week for discussion on AMD's new Zen 2 architecture, 7nm Vega GPUs, SSD encryption vulnerabilities, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Jim Tanous, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano, Ken Addison, and Sebastian Peak

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:42:27

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. Thanks to Casper for supporting our podcast! Save $50 on select mattresses at http://www.casper.com/pcper code pcper
  3. News items of interest:
  4. Picks of the Week:
    1. Jim: N7 Day! Amazon - Origin

Deactivate! Deactivate! Windows 10 will be deactivated!

Subject: General Tech | November 8, 2018 - 12:46 PM |
Tagged: windows 10, microsoft, oops

If you were greeted by a message today indicating that your Win10 Pro is no longer activated or needs to be reactivated as Win10 Home, you are not aloneMicrosoft have acknowledged an issue with their licensing servers which is having a rather noticeable effect on machines in several countries.  The issue seems to arise most often on machines which were upgraded from a previous version of Windows, or installed fresh using a key from a previous version, which Microsoft has supported from the get go.  The problem is unlikely to last for long, so do not start downgrading or reinstalling until we have an update from Microsoft, unless you really get off on reinstalling OSes.

It is a toss up between the link to Slashdot and the one to Microsoft Answers as to which provides the most amusment; the comments in both are everything you would expect and more!

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"If you're having trouble activating your Windows 10 Pro computer today, you're not alone. Forums and social media networks are getting flooded with complaints from users who say their machines have automatically become deactivated. Users say they are having trouble connecting with Microsoft's activation servers, with some saying they are being prompted to downgrade to Windows 10 Home."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Slashdot

AMD Shows Off Zen 2-Based EPYC "Rome" Server Processor

Subject: Processors | November 7, 2018 - 11:00 PM |
Tagged: Zen 2, rome, PCI-e 4, Infinity Fabric, EPYC, ddr4, amd, 7nm

In addition to AMD's reveal of 7nm GPUs used in its Radeon Instinct MI60 and MI50 graphics cards (aimed at machine learning and other HPC acceleration), the company teased a few morsels of information on its 7nm CPUs. Specifically, AMD teased attendees of its New Horizon event with information on its 7nm "Rome" EPYC processors based on the new Zen 2 architecture.

AMD EPYC Rome Zen 2.jpg

Tom's Hardware spotted the upcoming Epyc processor at AMD's New Horizon event.

The codenamed "Rome" EPYC processors will utilize a MCM design like its EPYC and Threadripper predecessors, but increases the number of CPU dies from four to eight (with each chiplet containing eight cores with two CCXs) and adds a new 14nm I/O die that sits in the center of processor that consolidates memory and I/O channels to help even-out the latency among all the cores of the various dies. This new approach allows each chip to directly access up to eight channels of DDR4 memory (up to 4TB) and will no longer have to send requests to neighboring dies connected to memory which was the case with, for example, Threadripper 2. The I/O die is speculated by TechPowerUp to also be responsible for other I/O duties such as PCI-E 4.0 and the PCH communication duties previously integrated into each die.

"Rome" EPYC processors with up to 64 cores (128 threads) are expected to launch next year with AMD already sampling processors to its biggest enterprise clients. The new Zen 2-based processors should work with existing Naples and future Milan server platforms. EPYC will feature from four to up to eight 7nm Zen 2 dies connected via Infinity Fabric to a 14nm I/O die.

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AMD CEO Lisa Su holding up "Rome" EPYC CPU during press conference earlier this year.

The new 7nm Zen 2 CPU dies are much smaller than the dies of previous generation parts (even 12nm Zen+). AMD has not provided full details on the changes it has made with the new Zen 2 architecutre, but it has apparently heavily tweaked the front end operations (branch prediction, pre-fetching) and increased cache sizes as well as doubling the size of the FPUs to 256-bit. The architectural improvements alogn with the die shrink should allow AMD to show off some respectable IPC improvements and I am interested to see details and how Zen 2 will shake out.

Also read:

Gigabyte Launches Flagship AORUS Z390 XTREME Motherboard

Subject: Motherboards | November 7, 2018 - 09:53 PM |
Tagged: gigabyte, aorus, Z390, Intel Z390

Gigabyte is launching a new flagship Z390 chipset-based motherboard under its AORUS brand. The aptly-named Z390 AORUS Xtreme ratchets up the aesthetics, power delivery, connectivity, and the RGB Fusion to prepare for Intel’s newest 9th Generation Core processors including the eight core Core i9 9900K.

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The AORUS Xtreme uses a 16-phase Digital IR power phase design that can self-balance to reduce clocks of VRM controller and heat generated by the various phases especially under heavy overclocking scenarios. Gigabyte continues to include its Fins-Array heatsinks though they have been upgraded to four direct touch heatpipes to help cool the VRM areas. There is also a massive backplate and coating on the underside of the PCB to help dissipate heat though in practice it’s likely more for aesthetics than anything. The LGA 1151 socket is paired with four DDR4 DIMM slots. Sitting below the processor are three PCI-E 3.0 x16 slots, two PCI-E 3.0 x1 slots, and three PCI-E 3.0 x4 M.2 (or SATA) slots with Thermal Guard heatsinks. Further, there are six SATA 6 Gpbs ports in the bottom right corner. As far as power delivery, the board has two 8-pin CPU power connectors, a right-angle solid pin 24-pin ATX connector, and a 6-pin PCI-E connector to provide auxiliary slot power for graphics cards.

The flagship motherboard includes Aquantia 10 Gigabit Ethernet, Intel Gigabit Ethernet, Intel CNVi 802.11ac 160 MHz 2x2 Wi-Fi, ALC1220-VB codec for audio (along with ESS SABRE DAC, Ti Burr-Brown OP Amps, and “studio grade” capacitors), and AORUS’ RGB Fusion LED controller which along with Smart Fan 5 can handle eight fans, eight digital LED strips, and eight RGB LEDs. Overclocking can be done via BIOS, Windows app, or OC Touch.

Rear I/O includes two Wi-Fi antenna connectors (Gigabyte includes a 4 dBi dual antenna with magnetic base), four USB 3.1, two USB 3.0, two USB 2.0, two USB Type-C Thunderbolt 3 (40 Gbps), one 10 GbE, one 1 GbE, one HDMI video output, and six audio outputs (five gold plated analog jacks and one S/PDIF optical out).

This extreme motherboard comes packed with just about everything an enthusiast could ask for, but be prepared for an extreme price of $549.99 MSRP.

Source: Aorus

Western Digital Launches 15 TB Ultrastar DC HC620 SMR Hard Drive

Subject: Storage | November 7, 2018 - 06:44 PM |
Tagged: western digital, SMR, hgst, HelioSeal, datacenter

Western Digital is expanding its data center hard drive offerings with the reveal of a 15TB model based on fourth generation HelioSeal and second generation Host Managed SMR (Shingled Magnetic Recording) technology. The new 15 TB Ultrastar DC HC620 is aimed at data center customers doing surveillance, object storage for cloud services, streaming media storage, online backup and archival storage, and other sequential write focused tasks. The 7200 RPM hard drive comes in SATA (6Gbps) or SAS (12Gbps) flavors, but is not a direct drop-in replacement for just any drive as it works with host managed SMR to optimize how data is written to the drive which needs to be sequentially to get any amount of decent performance out of it. Random performance (writes in particular) isn’t great in other words, but it does offer up to 31% lower idle watts/TB than prior generation drives while delivering respectable (for mechanical drives) sequential performance and areal density with 900TB of storage being able to fit in a 40U (60-unit) rack or 40TB more compared to using 14TB drives
 
WD Ultrastar DC HC620 SMR Hard Drive.jpg
 
Western Digital’s 15 TB DC HC620 (PDF)is a 7200 RPM hard drive with a 512 MB buffer. It is rated at 255 MB/s sustained transfer rates, 4.16 ms average latency, and 7.7ms read and 12ms write seek times. Further, the datacenter focused drives are rated for 550TB per year with a 2.5 million hour MTBF and a five year warranty.
 
While enthusiasts will not be using these new SMR drives, they may well be being used by the various cloud service providers and their services that end users take advantage of. It is interesting to see that shingled magnetic recording is still being developed and the increasing amount of data that is able to be crammed into the same 3.5-inch hard drive form factor. I am looking forward to future technologies like MAMR and HAMR as well to see just how far spinning rust can be pushed. While end users are enjoying the speed of solid state storage, hard drives are still alive and well in the data center thanks to TCO (total cost of ownership) and TB/watt/area metrics and the drive to optimize them being paramount. According to Western Digital, global data storage demands are going to approach 100 zetabytes within the next five years so I am curious how we will end up storing all of that and the kinds of technologies involved!
 

Your recommended weapons loadout for BFV

Subject: General Tech | November 7, 2018 - 01:51 PM |
Tagged: gaming, battlefield V, just cause 4

The required and recommended system specs for BFV have been announced, and unless you are hoping to enable ray tracing they are not too daunting.  A Ryzen 3 1300X or i7 4790, with 12GB of RAM and a GTX 1060 or RX 580 seem reasonable and the 50GB install seems almost small compared to some current generation games.  For RTX you will of course need to invest in a RTX 2070 at the least, as well as a better CPU. 

HEXUS also posted the specs to play Just Cause 4, while lacking ray tracing the requirements to run at 4K are still fairly impressive, drop by to see if you are ready to play or if you should be looking for an upgrade.

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"Back in early September we revealed the PC system requirements from the Battlefield V beta. Now EA/DICE has officially revealed the PC system requirements for Battlefield V - including a set of reqs for DXR (DirectX Raytracing) gaming (or 'RTX On' in Nvidia lingo). A quick look back and forth reveals the minimum specs have been raised a little, as have the recommended specs."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: HEXUS

Apple's special sauce, the A12X SoC

Subject: General Tech | November 7, 2018 - 12:50 PM |
Tagged: apple, SoC, A12X

Apple made a lot of claims with their new USB-C carrying iPad Pro and the A12X inside of it, stating it offer 90% better multicore performance of the previous A10X as well as twice the graphical power, they describe it as equivalent to the GCN 1.0 GPU in the XBone S, and finally that it is faster than 92% of all portable PCs.  That last claim is the one to raise the most eyebrows but in at least some cases it is not completely inaccurate. 

Ars Technica sat down with Anand Shimpi and Phil Schiller from Apple to discuss how the A12X is capable of so much more than the A12 and other previous generation SoCs.  As is common with Apple they don't offer a lot of specifics on the design but there are certainly some interesting tidbits revealed.

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"Apple's new iPad Pro sports several new features of note, including the most dramatic aesthetic redesign in years, Face ID, new Pencil features, and the very welcome move to USB-C. But the star of the show is the new A12X system on a chip."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Ars Technica

Corsair's H100i RGB Platinum; pump up the RGBs

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 6, 2018 - 06:04 PM |
Tagged: corsair, H100i RGB Platinum, watercooler

Corsair have updated their all in one watercooler lineup with two new models, the 240mm version of which is the H110i RGB Platinum which The Tech Report recently reviewed.  As with all components recently, this release focuses on adding RGBs to an existing product lineup.  In order to control the lighting, you need to squeeze quite a bit of cabling into a small area, so some may want to skip that setup even though they paid extra for those blinkenlichten.  The pump and fans are quiet compared to previous models, which might tempt those who dislike the noise created by Corsair's Pro line, so check it out if you are looking for improved lights or sound.

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"Corsair's H100i RGB Platinum closed-loop liquid cooler is the company's first with addressable RGB LEDs on its pump head and in its fan hubs. We put this cooler to the test to see whether its performance matches its striking looks."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Meet the AMD Radeon Instinct MI60 and MI50 accelerators

Subject: General Tech | November 6, 2018 - 03:42 PM |
Tagged: AMD Radeon Instinct, MI60, MI50, 7nm, ROCm 2.0, HPC, amd

If you haven't been watching AMD's launch of the 7nm Vega based MI60 and MI50 then you can catch up right here.

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You won't be gaming with these beasts, but for those working on deep learning, HPC, cloud computing or rendering apps you might want to take a deeper look.  The new PCIe 4.0 cards use HBM2 ECC memory and Infinity Fabric interconnects, offering up to 1 TB/s of memory bandwidth. 

The MI60 features 32GB of HBM2 with 64 Compute Units containing 4096 Stream Processors which translates into 59 TOPS INT8, up to 29.5 TFLOPS FP16, 14.7 TFLOPS FP32 and 7.4 TFLOPS FP64.  AMD claims is currently the fastest double precision  PCIe card on the market, with the 16GB Tesla V100 offering 7 TFLOPS of FP64 performance.

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The MI50 is a little less powerful though with 16GB of HBM2, 53.6 TFLOPS of INT8, up to 26.8 TFLOPS FP16, 13.4 TFLOPS FP32 and 6.7 TFLOPS FP64 it is no slouch.

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With two Infinity Fabric links per GPU, they can deliver up to 200 GB/s of peer-to-peer bandwidth and you can configure up to four GPUs in a hive ring configuration, made of two hives in eight GPU servers with the help of the new ROCm 2.0 software. 

Expect to see AMD in more HPC servers starting at the beginning of the new year, when they start shipping.

 

Source: AMD

SSD's firmware encryption is pretty floppy

Subject: General Tech | November 6, 2018 - 01:02 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, encryption, crucial, bitlocker

The hardware world is full of badly thought out implementations, from the inconvenient to the utterly incompetent, and today we have one of the latter.  Bitlocker and other popular encryption tools can use software or hardware to encrypt and store the data encryption key, with many opting for the accelerated hardware encryption baked into many SSDs.  This has turned out to be a bad idea, as tests on a variety of models show you can grab an encrypted disk, plug into the debug ports and convince it to accept any value as an authorized DEK and give you full access to the data on that drive.  This is in part due to the hardware not using the owner's password for encryption ... at all.  The Register's article offers a suggestion, which is to make use of software encryption methods which do incorporate the users password and can be set to actually not use the same DEK across the entire drive. 

Read on for suggestions on solutions which should mitigate this flaw and which can coexist peacefully with hardware encryption.

ssddrivetest.jpg

"Basically, the cryptographic keys used to encrypt and decrypt the data are not derived from the owner's password, meaning, you can seize a drive and, via a debug port, reprogram it to accept any password. At that point, the SSD will use its stored keys to cipher and decipher its contents. Yes, it's that dumb."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register