Velocity Micro Unleashes Epyc ProMagix HD150 Workstation

Subject: Systems | May 3, 2018 - 07:39 AM |
Tagged: velocity micro, EPYC, EPYC 7601, amd, workstation

AMD scored another design win with Velocity Micro announcing a new workstation built around the Zen-based EPYC processor. The new ProMagix HD150 is a single socket Epyc-based system that slots in between the company's existing ThreadRipper-based HD80A and the dual socket Epyc HD360A workstations. The Velocity Micro system takes the company's GX4 aluminum E-ATX chassis and crams a ton of processing power into it.

Velocity Micro GX4.jpg

The new workstation is based around the Supermicro H11SSL motherboard and it can be confiugred with up to an AMD Epyc 7601 processor with 32 cores and 64 threads clocked at 2.2 GHz base and 3.2 GHz boost with 64MB L3 cache and 128 lanes of PCI-E. The processor which is cooled by a closed loop liquid cooler with 240mm radiator can be paired with up to 512GB DDR4-2666 ECC RDIMMs or 256GB ECC LRDIMMs for main memory and up to a 2TB Samsung 960 Pro SSD (or two Crucial MX550s) and two 8TB mechanical hard drives for storage. The Supermicro board has sixteen SATA ports as well as multiple PCI-E x16 and x8 slots so users can add plenty of additional storage and I/O expansion. Further, users can configure the system with a NVIDIA Quadro GP100 graphics accelerator as well as up to two Radeon Pro SSG Vega 10 cards (there are also NVIDIA GTX, Titan, and Quadro or AMD Vega, WX Pro, and SSG options) for GPGPU tasks. The two Radeon Pro SSG cards have 4096 stream processors, 16GB of HBM2, and 2TB of solid state storage each and are rated at 12.3 TFLOPS of single precision and 769 GFLOPS of double precision performance.

Velocity Micro.jpg

Needless to say, you can configure an extremely capable workstation thanks to AMD's Epyc that can handle both CPU and GPU efficient tasks with plenty of I/O lanes for storage and expansion. Velocity Micro claims that the HD150 workstation is aimed at simulation, rendering, 8K video editing, and machine learning workloads. The systems can be configured on their website or customized by ordering over the phone and start at $3,299 with a default one year warranty and lifetime US-based support. The workstations are built and tested in Richmond, Virginia. As far as pricing, this, ahem, Epyc system is squarely an enterprise affair with fully loaded configurations passing $33,000 easily.

It is promising to see AMD's server processor getting design wins in this market space.

HyperX Launches Predator DDR4 RGB Modules With Infrared Sync

Subject: Memory | May 3, 2018 - 04:06 AM |
Tagged: hyperx, gaming, ddr4, ddr4-2933, RGB, RGB LED

Kingston’s enthusiast-focused HyperX brand recently launched a new set of RGB-equipped DDR4 memory modules that use IR transceivers to sync up the LEDs across all the DIMMs. The aptly named Predator DDR4 RGB memory kits feature stylized angular black aluminum heat spreaders and RGB LEDs along the top edge. The DIMMs use eight 1GB chips along a single side.

Kingston HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB.png

HyperX’s new Predator DDR4 modules are compatible with Asus Aura Sync, Gigabyte RGB Fusion, and MSI Mystic Light Sync RGB LED control software. The new kits are available in 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB capacities using one, two, or four 8GB modules. HyperX rates (PDF) the modules at DDR4 2933 MHz with CL15-17-17 timings at 1.35V when using the Intel XMP profile. Out of the box, the modules run at 2400 MHz (CL17) and 1.2 volts, however.

The RGB modules reportedly offer smooth lighting effects with low latencies thanks to the direct module-to-module IR communication keeping everything in sync.

HyperX Predator RGB DDR4.jpg

The HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB modules come with a lifetime warranty and have a MSRP of $257 for the 16 GB (2x8GB) kit and $513 for the 32 GB (4 x 8GB) kit. Fortunately, the kits are going for a bit less than MSRP online with the 16 GB RGB kit going for $245.99 and the 32GB RGB kit going for $491.99 or about $20 to $30 over the non-RGB Predator DDR4 3000 MHz offerings.

Source: HyperX

Unity 2018.1 Released

Subject: General Tech | May 2, 2018 - 08:13 PM |
Tagged: Unity, video games

The first entry in Unity’s 2018.x line of releases has just been published to their website. Developers can now choose to migrate their projects to it and expect official support until 2018.2, or they can stick with 2017.4 and for two years – but not get new engine features. That said, if you have a big project that is expected to ship within a handful of months, then you may just want things to stay constant and stable until you ship (and maybe publish a wave of DLC).

unity-2018-2018.1_image31.jpg

There’s a few big additions with this version, but the ones I care about most are still in preview. The first is, of course, the ECS design pattern with the C# Job System. It is still super early days with this one, but I’m very interested in a rigid, optimized, data-driven workflow that makes it easy to batch tasks together. Give me constraints – it’s okay – if I can get value from it.

Then we get to the Scriptable Render Pipeline and its two presets: High-Definition Render Pipeline and Lightweight Render Pipeline. This allows the developer to control how their content is rendered, including how it is culled, how materials and lights are processed, what materials and lights can do, can so forth. They also say that some features will only come to the High-Definition Render Pipeline to get people off the standard workflow into the new render path… but I wonder how that will affect developers who create their own scriptable render pipeline. It’s reasonable to assume that a developer who makes their own path will need to do some level of tweaking to get new features, but I wonder how much effort Unity will put into helping those developers.

There is also a new, beta update to the Post Processing stack. This should be familiar to users of Unreal Engine 4. Unity has continued to push a bunch of effects, like color grading, bloom, reflection, ambient occlusion, certain antialiasing techniques, and so forth, into a canonical suite of filters. They have also added volumes that developers can place in their scene to add a hierarchy for smooth transitions between effects.

From a practical standpoint, the new package manager also looks very interesting. There’s not much to write about for it, in an enthusiast PC hardware site at least, but it could be a nice way of delivering features to users. Instead of waiting for a whole new Unity release, you can fiddle with new features on a one-by-one basis. Maybe even third-party content, typically found in the asset store, can find its way on there – with a network of dependencies that it just sorts out for you.

Check it out on Unity’s website.

Source: Unity

Faster my stompybots, faster! Mod out the pauses in BattleTech

Subject: General Tech | May 2, 2018 - 03:19 PM |
Tagged: mod, gaming, battletech

The slow pace of BattleTech, which is driving many people spare, seems to have been a deliberate choice on the developers part.  Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN links to Reddit posts which make this fact obvious and thankfully allow you to reverse this decision.  There are five variables you can edit in the games file directory with a text editor to reduce the pauses to 0, or whatever your preferred number is.   There are also several ways to multiply the speed at which your Mech's move, the easiest of which is creating a registry key which makes all mechs move five times as fast, or you can manually edit the 53 files for each mech with a multiplier of your choice.  There is a third way, involving activating a debug mode, which offers a wide variety of commands for your enjoyment if you so desire.

ouch.PNG

"Two things stand between BattleTech and true greatness. User guides and videos solve the bonkers decision to not so much as hint at absolute combat necessities that make the difference between grim slugfest and satisfying tactical supremacy, but the other one’s trickier."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Seven brown new fans from Noctua

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 2, 2018 - 02:45 PM |
Tagged: sfma1, noctua, NF-P12 redux, NF-A12x25

Noctua have released seven new fans across three product lines, the NF-A12x25 family, the NF-P12 redux family and a single NA-SFMA1.   The naming scheme helps you determine what their function is, the PWM models for fan controllers, ULN are the ultra low noise fans and the FLX allow you to choose between two adapters to balance your cooling and noise levels.

noctua_nf_a12x25_PWM_3.png

These new fans are built from Sterrox liquid-crystal polymer to add strength and stability to the fans even at high speeds and rotation as well as Noctua's self-stabilizing oil-pressure bearings.  The NF-A12x25 series are designed to be able to provide enough static pressure to be effectively used on radiators when paired with the SFMA1 adapter, as well as being used as an air cooler.  Those with sensitive ears should look to the NF-P12 redux series with three models rotating at 1700, 1300 or 900RPM, ranging from 25.1 dB(A) down to 12,6 dB(A).

The NF-A12x25 will retail for $29.90US, the NF-P12 redux for $13.90 and the NA-SFMA1for $11.90.  Check out the full PR below.

na_sfma1_2.jpg

Vienna, May 2nd 2018 – Noctua today presented its much-anticipated next-generation 120x25mm A-series fan and the complementary NA-SFMA1 adaptors that allow it to be used on 140mm based watercoolers. The new NF-A12x25 is the first fan made of Noctua’s novel Sterrox® LCP material and integrates the company’s latest innovations in aerodynamic engineering in order to achieve an unprecedented level of quiet cooling performance. While the NF-A12x25 becomes the new flagship model in the 120mm range, the classic NF-P12 will be reissued in the streamlined, more affordable redux line.

“The NF-A12x25 is our most advanced fan today. We’ve spent more than 4.5 years developing it and it’s been easily the most thorny, intricate development project we’ve completed so far,” explains Lars Strömbäck (Noctua CTO): “In order to achieve our goal of surpassing our renowned NF-F12 and NF-S12A, we went for a completely different approach and had to use a tip clearance of only 0.5mm, which poses various new difficulties in manufacturing.”

Whereas the award-winning NF-F12 and NF-S12A are specialised solutions that are either optimised for maximum static pressure or maximum airflow, the new NF-A12x25 follows the approach of Noctua’s A-series in being a true all-rounder that yields superb results in all types of usage, regardless of whether it’s in low-impedance, airflow-oriented applications such as case cooling, or high-impedance, pressure-demanding scenarios such as on heatsinks and watercooling radiators. In practice, the NF-A12x25 not only outperforms the renowned NF-F12 on 120mm based watercooling radiators, but combined with the new, optional NA-SFMA1 adaptor frames, it also offers better efficiency than many 140mm fans on 140mm based systems.

One of the cornerstones of the NF-A12x25’s next-generation performance is its record tight tip clearance (distance between the blade tips and the inside of the frame) of only 0.5mm. This highly ambitious design helps the NF-A12x25 to work more efficiently against back pressure, such as on heatsinks or radiators, by reducing leak flows through the gap between impeller and frame. Manufacturing a fan with such a small tip clearance is extremely delicate and was only made possible by Noctua’s new Sterrox® liquid-crystal polymer (LCP) material, which features extreme tensile strength, an exceptionally low thermal expansion coefficient and excellent dimensional stability.

“We have never put so much research and effort into a single fan so far, both on the level of fine-tuning the aerodynamic construction and on the level of materials and manufacturing,” says Roland Mossig (Noctua CEO): “Many challenges had to be overcome, but now we’re proud with the end result and confident that the NF-A12x25 will become a new benchmark for premium-quality quiet 120mm fans.”

The NF-A12x25 will be available in a 4-pin PWM version for automatic speed control, 3-pin FLX version with Low-Noise Adaptors for three different speed settings as well as a near-silent 3-pin ULN (Ultra-Low-Noise) version. As the NF-A12x25 becomes the new flagship model in Noctua’s 120mm range, the classic NF-P12 moves to the streamlined, more affordable redux line. It will henceforth be available in 1700 and 1300rpm 4-pin PWM versions as well as 1300 and 900rpm 3-pin versions.

 

Source: Noctua

Go Go Gadget Oculus Go, the cord cutters VR headset

Subject: General Tech | May 2, 2018 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: oculus go, vr headset, wireless vr headset

The Oculus Go just went on sale for a mere $200 and Ars Technica snapped one up for review.  The most striking feature of the VR headset is the lack of wires, the headset communicates via 802.11b/g/n/ac and Bluetooth 4.1 with GPS built in as well and the 2600 mAh battery will give you roughly 2 hours of continuous use before needing a charge.  The headset shuts off after 5 minutes if it cannot detect both a face and hand motion, old 80's muppets aren't enough to keep it on.

The technical specs are close to what you would expect, with a combined resolution of 2560×1440 5.5" and two refresh modes, a standard 60Hz and an overclocked 72Hz refresh rate.  There were more than a few corners cut to reduce the price, such as the ability to adjust the distance between the screens to match your pupils with a slider but nothing quite as bad as the additional requirements you need to use the headset; you must install, long into and run an app on a connected smartphone as well as provide your GPS location when using the Oculus Go.  Those last two requirements make this headset rather less attractive, but it is still worth checking out the review.

ok go.PNG

Surprise! Oculus released a new virtual reality headset today. The Oculus Go standalone headset is now for sale at Amazon, Newegg, and Best Buy starting at $199—yes, $199, with no other hardware required—following a retail-launch unveil at Facebook's annual F8 conference."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Ars Technica

ARM Introduces Physical Security to Cortex-M Line

Subject: General Tech | May 2, 2018 - 11:00 AM |
Tagged: voltage, physical attacks, exploits, EM, CryptoIsland, CryptoCell, Cortex-M35P, cortex, arm

 

The world is rife with exploits. We see and hear about them everyday. It is a major problem for device makers that try to use cutting edge technology in their products, but do not know what potential vulnerabilities can be exposed. ARM has a robust security suite available for their chips that can be licensed and implemented, but so far these have dealt primarily with software. Nothing has been done in consumer chips to protect from other side-channel exploits in which the chip is physically accessed.

arm_ps01.jpg

Physical security was once the realm of military style hardware that were hardened and designed to be nearly impervious if falling into the wrong hands. Now ARM is offering partners the ability to implement several physical security features into their chips to help defeat those who wish to exploit these products.

arm_ps02.jpg

The first product to get this treatment is the new Cortex-M35P. This is based on previously released Cortex-M3x technology featuring the Armv8-M ISA. It is a new chip in that it has all of the features for physical security integrated into the design. It also features all of the previous security IP that ARM has released including TrustZone, CryptoIsland, and CryptoCell.

arm_ps03.jpg

Physcial attacks can come through a variety of ways. Monitoring voltage and EM from the chip is the least invasive, while physically accessing the device and exposing the core down to the transistor level obviously destroys the chip but gives the attacker a lot of information about the chip. The former attacks can be done by people with varying levels of experience and commonly acquired tools. The latter attack requires a tremendous amount of knowledge as well as require high end equipment not normally found outside of chip design and fabrication firms. ARM cannot protect against dissecting the part, but they can help protect against the more non-invasive exploits.

arm_ps04.jpg

EM and voltage monitoring can give clues about potential sideband exploits that would work with the chip. The attacker records these measurements when the chip is doing work such as encryption. This then can lead to more specific attacks on the chip. ARM is able to design countermeasures on these chips to either limit EM output or to “dirty” the output so that it reveals little about the operation of the chip. ARM is able to do much the same when it comes to voltage tampering.

arm_ps05.jpg

ARM did not go into any significant detail on the actual mechanisms of these security features. All we know is that these are features designed into the chip from the beginning and cannot be applied retroactively to previous chips. This makes sense due to these being physical attacks, and if ARM detailed the countermeasures, then the attackers can more easily work around them.

arm_ps06.jpg

Security is a process. One fix will not create a totally locked-down world. It takes a pretty extensive infrastructure to address all of the threats that are likely to be encountered by IoT devices throughout the world. Adding to the physical IP with security measures allows ARM and its clients to be that little bit more confident that they are exposing their users to the least amount of risk possible when it comes to exploiting these products.

Source: ARM

Apexgaming's 850W PSU; decent price, decent power

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 1, 2018 - 02:15 PM |
Tagged: Apexgaming, ag-850m, 850W, modular psu

Apexgaming is not top of mind when considering the purchase of a PSU, but with a 10 year warranty it seems worth seeing how it fares on TechPowerUp's test bench.  On paper this fully modular PSU is capable of providing its full 850W to its single 12V rail, or it can provide 25A to the 3.3V and 5V if you somehow have a component which would require such exceptional power.  Overall, the quality of power provided is acceptable, but not top notch, which makes sense at it's $110 price point.  TechPowerUp also noted some issues with the fan, which you can read about in detail here.

in_top4.jpg

"The AG-850M is made by Solytech and belongs to Apextechusa's new Apexgaming PSU line. It has a capacity of 850W, a fully modular cable design, and is backed by a ten-year warranty. On paper, everything looks good; however, in real life, things are not always at their best."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: TechPowerUp

Firefox goes open sores

Subject: General Tech | May 1, 2018 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: firefox, ad supported, open source, firefox 60

Targeted advertising is all the rage right now and now FireFox wants in on the (class) action.  Starting with Firefox 60 sponsored content will start showing in your browser, though perhaps not the Pocket variety which is very easy to disable.  The reason is that Mozilla needs revenue, which is not flowing in great enough quantities from other streams, and they claim the ads will be "Worthy of your time. Not just clicks."; whatever that might mean. 

They are implementing this in a unique way, not only keeping all the data on your machine instead of slapped into a cloud somewhere, but also allowing you to access the harvested data yourself.  Perhaps you will be able to erase the one search you did on toilet seats so that you are no longer bombarded with targeted ads that think you either have 50 bathrooms or consider them single use products.  The new browser arrives on the 9th; pop by The Inquirer for more info.

Mozilla-Firefox.jpg

"It promises that "all personalisation happens at the client side" - this means that your data is kept on your computer, not uploaded. It also adds that as Firefox is entirely open source, you can look under the bonnet and see exactly what data is or isn't collected."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Intel Kicks Kaby Lake-X CPUs to the Curb

Subject: Processors | May 1, 2018 - 10:25 AM |
Tagged: kaby lake-x, Intel, 7740x, 7640x

So, do you remember the Kaby Lake-X processors that launched along side the Skylake-X parts back on June 19, 2017. These are (were) 14nm+ processors built into the LGA2066 socket as a part of the X299 chipset launch. They shipped as the Core i7-7740X (4-core, 8-thread) and Core i5-7640X (4-core, 4-thread) and at the time I had this to say about them:

These are very…interesting CPUs. They do not offer new features compared to the Core i7-7700K or Core i5-7600K, but run at barely higher clocks (100 MHz on the base on the 7740X for example). They don’t see more PCIe integration, they don’t have larger caches. They are basically the same Kaby Lake design we have come to know previously but in a new package and prepped for a new set of motherboards. Is that an advantage? It’s hard to know yet, but in general, the X299 motherboard market is going to be more expensive than the Z270 motherboard market, meaning you are going to pay more in total to own this CPU. Does the added TDP give us more thermal headroom for overclocking? Maybe the new heat spreader? I’m not sure and Intel hasn’t said yet. But what they have stated is that they wanted to offer the option to consumers that wanted the “absolute fastest gaming processor” with the best clock speeds at a reasonable price.

7740x.jpg

Even in June, the value and positioning of the Kaby Lake-X processor was a mystery. Well Intel has fixed all of that today by announced end-of-life for both of those processors.

7740x-eol.png

Intel's language in the release is kind of interesting: "Market demand for the products listed in the "Products Affected/Intel Ordering Codes" tables below have shifted to other Intel products." Yeah, I bet it has. 

These were parts without a real audience, and their creation was a consistent mystery to the enthusiast market Intel targeted. For many, it was a honest sign that Intel has lost track of what the PC market was asking for. At least the short lifespan of the pair indicates that Intel got the message loud and clear.

If you are so inclined, you can still pick up the 7740X and 7640X for a while longer. Here is the table of Kaby Lake-X's remaining life.

7740x-eol2.png

You can read the entire Intel document here if you'd like. 

Source: Intel

Oh Hey! Windows 10 April Update Is Online!

Subject: General Tech | April 30, 2018 - 08:59 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, windows 10

Microsoft has just released Windows 10 Version 1803 to the general public. This one is called the April Update, and it comes with the build number of 17134. It was a long update for me, clocking in at almost an hour… with a Samsung SSD and a desktop Core i7… but it went smoothly.

windows-10.png

I could immediately notice several changes with this upgrade. First, the Settings screen has been, once again, redesigned. Each button looks smaller and wider, which I think looks a little cleaner than it has been. There is also a highlight effect, called Reveal, around your mouse cursor as you move around, but only if you have Transparency effects turned on in your Colors panel.

If you’re curious about the features, Microsoft has a handful of YouTube videos, such as:

To pick up the latest version, just run a check on Windows Update (if you’re on Windows 10).

Source: Microsoft

The number of good game streamers is Ryzen

Subject: Processors | April 30, 2018 - 02:54 PM |
Tagged: Ryzen 7 2700X, Ryzen 5 2600X, ryzen 2, amd

The Tech Report tested the gaming prowess of the new Ryzen 2 chips in a variety of games at 1080p; as the 1080 Ti they used in all the test systems equalled the playing field so that the CPU performance could been seen.  If you game at higher resolutions, then the performance delta is moot as it is your GPU which is handling the load but at 1080p gaming, CPU and DDR frequency matters.  While the new chips did not manage to surpass Intel's they closed the gap noticeably compared to the initial generation of Ryzens and they were capable of doing something Intel's offerings simply can't.  Those who like to stream their games while they play would do well to consider the Ryzen 7 2700X and Ryzen 7 1800X as they offered a significantly better experience and were the only ones capable of a decent stream of the latest Deus Ex game. 

2700xinboard.jpg

"AMD's second-generation Ryzen CPUs have impressive productivity chops, but do they have game? We ran the Ryzen 7 2700X and Ryzen 5 2600X through our high-refresh-rate gaming and streaming gauntlet to find out."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

 

How sweet it is, to buy new GPUs ... yes it is

Subject: General Tech | April 30, 2018 - 01:49 PM |
Tagged: gpu, cryptocurrency, msrp

It does seem to be that GPU prices have recently begun to trend down, heading towards their MSRP though with a ways to go yet.  There is no definitive reason for such good news, but there are certainly some obvious factors, of which cryptocurrency is the most glaring.  With more mature currencies close to being mined out, and being designed to run better on ASIC's anyways, that part of the crowd is no longer buying GPUs.  The more recent altcoins which were designed for GPUs are having some minor trust issues at the moment, and there are those designing ASICs for those currencies which is also taking the heat off.  

Also consider the maturity of both Vega and Pascal, they have been out long enough for supply to catch up with demand and in theory there are new products coming soon from both vendors which generally means they are looking to get rid of exisiting stock.  Slashdot and other sites offer a variety of theories but no matter how you slice it, this is good news.

sanity.PNG

"If you were looking for a new graphics card for your PC over the last year, your search probably ended with you giving up and slinging some cusses at cryptocurrency miners. But now the supply of video cards is on the verge of rebounding, and I don't think you should wait much longer to pull the trigger on a purchase."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Slashdot

ZTE Shuts Down Their OTA Servers...

Subject: Mobile | April 28, 2018 - 04:14 PM |
Tagged: zte, axon 7

So, for the last couple of years, ZTE was making a point to keep their devices supported with up-to-date software. They were a bit on the slow side, but devices got their updates eventually, including new features and other improvements.

community-2018-firefail.png

Then, recently, the US Department of Commerce banned American companies from exporting goods to ZTE for seven years. This means that they can no longer acquire things like Qualcomm processors. According to the Nikkei Asian Review, Taiwan’s Bureau of Foreign Trade followed in the US’s footsteps and banned companies in Taiwan from selling to ZTE, which also rules out sourcing from companies like MediaTek.

At around the same time, ZTE was wrapping up their Oreo update beta. A new wave of participants was added for a couple of weeks, and then it was announced that the program has ended. The export ban occurred between those two points. This could have meant that they were ready to release, and it could have also meant that they gave up.

zte-2018-spinningupdate.png

It'll just keep doing this... over and over...

Now, if you attempt to run ZTE’s system update app, it just spins forever – they shut their update servers down. It looks like they gave up.

So… yeah. That sucks. It was a good phone, too.

Gigabyte's Aero 15X can work all day and play all night

Subject: Mobile | April 27, 2018 - 02:33 PM |
Tagged: x-rite, laptop, i7-8750h, gigabyte, coffee lake h, aero 15Xv8, 144hz, 1070 Max-Q

Gigabyte's Aero 15X is a working laptop, it may have a GTX 1070 Max-Q powering its 144Hz panel, but it does not offer G-SYNC.  Instead it has X-Rite Pantone certification, perfect for professional work.  The 15.6" laptop is 18.9mm thick and weighs in at 4.4lbs, with a fair amount of that being the 94Wh battery.  TechSpot was somewhat disappointed to discover the 16GB of DDR4-2666  is on a single DIMM, and suggest picking up another immediately to enjoy the benefits of dual channel memory.  If you are looking for a laptop you can design graphics and video on, with enough power for occasional gaming then check out the Aero 15X.

Capture.PNG

"Today we're taking a closer look at the Gigabyte Aero 15X, launched alongside Intel's new H-series Coffee Lake processors which brought up to 6 cores and 12 threads to the laptop form factor. Gigabyte is key to stress this isn't just a gaming laptop, but a machine designed for productivity, and that shows with features like an X-Rite certified display."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

More Mobile Articles

 

Source: TechSpot

The cure worse than the disease; get your new patches or enjoy a total meltdown

Subject: General Tech | April 27, 2018 - 12:59 PM |
Tagged: meltdown, microsoft, security, patch, Windows 7, server 2008 r2

Wasn't it hilarious when Microsoft released a patch for the Meltdown flaw that made things even worse by allowing write access to kernel memory as well as read access?  Well, if you haven't the patch which fixes the patch in place you won't be laughing so hard today.  The Register has seen proof of concept code which makes use of this flaw to elevate a DOS shell window to NT AUTHORITY\System from a user without admin privileges.  Get yourself patched up, especially that Server 2008 instance!

stop-hitting-yourself-meme.jpg

"If you're not up-to-date with your Intel CPU Meltdown patches for Windows 7 or Server 2008 R2, get busy with that, because exploit code for Microsoft's own-goal flaw is available."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

PCPer Mailbag #41 - Cache Me If You Can

Subject: Editorial | April 27, 2018 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: video, pcper mailbag, Allyn Malventano

It's time for the PCPer Mailbag, our weekly show where Ryan and the team answer your questions about the tech industry, the latest and greatest GPUs, the process of running a tech review website, and more!

On today's show, Allyn is here to answer your storage questions:

00:27 - Building a cheap 60-drive storage array?
06:48 - Insane SSD prices?
09:18 - SSDs improve game frame rate?
12:58 - Using Optane to cache an SSHD?
18:34 - Formatting hard drives that won't mount?
20:29 - HD Tune & benchmarking large drives?
26:41 - RAID drives showing up as individual disks?
30:43 - Benchmarking high queue depth on single threads?

Want to have your question answered on a future Mailbag? Leave a comment on this post or in the YouTube comments for the latest video. Check out new Mailbag videos each Friday!

Be sure to subscribe to our YouTube Channel to make sure you never miss our weekly reviews and podcasts, and please consider supporting PC Perspective via Patreon to help us keep videos like our weekly mailbag coming!

Source: YouTube

i-Rocks' K70E gaming keyboard, rocking those capacitive switches

Subject: General Tech | April 26, 2018 - 06:37 PM |
Tagged: RGB, K70E, input, i-Rocks, gaming keyboard, capacitive switches

i-Rocks developed their own non-contact electro-capacitive switches for their new K70E keyboard, which will feel more like a membrane keyboard than a mechanical switch but offer you the choice of 2.2 mm (high) or 1.4 mm (low) actuation depths.  There are independent RGBs under each and every key which can display a variety of colours, programmed via their driver.  If you don't like the white fascia, there are various skins you can place over the keyboard and cap fetishists will appreciate the thick ABS plastic construction and doubleshot injected primary legends.  There is a full review typed out at TechPowerUp.

lighting-1.jpg

"The i-Rocks K70E is a high-end keyboard with a feature set boasting configurable capacitive switches and per-key RGB backlighting, with software support backing onboard controls. At the same time, it retains the fun factor by using a transparent top plate and accessory paper skins for a high degree of customization."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: TechPowerUp

The one, the only, Cooler Master's MASTERAIR MA621P air cooler for Threadripper

Subject: Networking | April 26, 2018 - 03:52 PM |
Tagged: tr4, Threadripper, MASTERAIR MA621P, cooler master, amd, air cooler

So far we have mostly seen reviews of watercoolers for Threadripper but there is an air cooler designed to tame this multi-threaded beast.  The Cooler Master  MASTERAIR MA621P is one such heatsink, a 1.2kg beast with two fans.  [H]ard|OCP's testing shows this cooler to be capable of cooling your 1950X at stock speeds, but do not expect the overclocks an AiO watercooler allows.  The installation is a bit of a challenge but this is the least expensive cooler for Threadripper, as well as being the only air cooler for it from CM.  Check the full review to get a closer look at this large chunk of metal.

1524706126nuzqww607v_1_9_l.jpg

"The AMD Ryzen Threadripper is a beast when it comes to overclocking and cooling. Cooler Master steps into the ring with the first Threadripper-specific air cooler that we have come across. We have put it through the paces here on our highly overclocked and overvolted 1950X. Does the MasterAir MA621P have what it takes?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Podcast #497 - Ryzen X470 NVMe performance, Samsung 970 performance, and more!

Subject: General Tech | April 26, 2018 - 11:35 AM |
Tagged: Samsung, ryzen, rtx, podcast, philips, nvidia, logitech, K95, Intel, Hydro PTM, fsp, craft, corsair, Cannon Lake-U, battletech, amd, 970 PRO, 970 EVO, 8086K

PC Perspective Podcast #497 - 04/26/18

Join us this week for discussion on Ryzen X470 NVMe performance, Samsung 970 performance, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts:Allyn Malventano, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison,

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:39:00

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. Thanks to Away for supporting PC Perspective. Go to https://www.awaytravel.com/pcper and use the promo code pcper to get $20 off a suitcase!
  3. News items of interest:
  4. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:30:30 Josh: I love this case.
    2. 1:32:15 Ken: CloudHQ
  5. Closing/outro
 
Source: