Back to school or just the beach, the best mobile devices to drag with you

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | August 21, 2017 - 11:49 AM |
Tagged: laptop, cellphone

The Tech Report have polled their crew to build a list of the best mobile devices on the market to help you enjoy your summer.  Amazon's tablets were a top pick thanks to the reasonable prices you can purchase them at; they won't be able to play Crysis but there are plenty of other things you can do.  For those who need a bigger screen without overly increasing the price you can peruse the Chromebooks or you could just head straight to the big ticket items in the gaming laptop section.  Drop by for a look at what you might be interested in over at TR.

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"It's time for another edition of The Tech Report's mobile staff picks, where we comb the worlds of tablets, laptops, and phones to separate the best from the rest."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation Vulkan Support Soon

Subject: General Tech | August 19, 2017 - 10:00 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, oxide, Oxide Games, vulkan

Oxide Games has been mentioned all throughout the development of the next-generation graphics APIs, DirectX 12, Mantle, and Vulkan. Their Star Swarm “stress test” was one of the first practical examples of a game that desperately needs to make a lot of draw calls. Also, their rendering algorithm is very different from the other popular game engines, where lighting is performed on the object rather than the screen, which the new APIs help out with.

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Currently, Ashes of the Singularity supports DirectX 11 and DirectX 12, but Vulkan will be added soon. Oxide will be pushing the new graphics api in the 2.4 update, bringing increased CPU performance to all OSes but especially Windows 7 and 8 (neither of which support DirectX 12), and a free DLC pack that contains nine co-op maps. They also plan to continue optimizing Ashes of the Singularity for Vulkan in the future.

All of this will be available on Thursday, August 24th.

The Enermax LIQMAX II 240 shunts away 250W of TDP

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 18, 2017 - 02:14 PM |
Tagged: LIQMAX II 240, enermax, AIO

Enermax's LIQMAX AIO cooler has not received a lot of attention, in the case of [H]ard|OCP they were less than impressed with the choice to locate the fan controller on the hub.  The second generation has remedied that issue by moving the switch to the side of the fans which makes it much more convenient when you need to adjust it.  They also praise the evolution of the mounting brackets which have become easier to install with every new generation, though on a Threadripper you will still need to use AMD's bracket to install the LIQMAX II.  Overall, the performance exceeded their expectations, for an $80 AIO solution it is quite effective albeit somewhat loud on the highest setting.  Drop by for a look at their full review.

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"Enermax is extremely proud of its Liqmax II 240 CPU AIO cooler. It is one of the few coolers you will find that it proudly displays its TDP rating right on the front of the box, which happens to be "350W+." With its Batwing fan blades, ceramic bearing pump, and Shunt-Channel-Technology it is a sure winner, right? Let's find out."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Fishing for Ice Lake rumours

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2017 - 01:16 PM |
Tagged: rumours, Intel, ice lake, coffee lake, 9th generation core

It's Friday so why not engage in some speculation with us about Intel's upcoming new chips?  We will start off by confusing the issue with a post detailing Intel's naming conventions that The Inquirer found.  It would seem that not only is the "Ice Lake processor family is a successor to the 8th generation Intel Core processor family" but it is also described as an "“8th generation Intel Core Processor Family” and available only to early access users.  One can only hope that there is a typo in Intel's decoder ring as the current naming schemes are already confusing enough between AMD and Intel without adding more levels of complexity.

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That makes the above a little more interesting than unannounced low power parts usually are.  AnandTech recently learned of these two new families of 8th gen chips, the i7-8xxx and i5-8xxx, both of which offer double the amount of cores as their 7th gen processors.  The base frequencies are lower than the previous generation, perhaps to remain inside the 15W TDP with double the amount of cores, with the turbo frequencies remaining a mystery for now.  With the aforementioned confusion, it is possible these could be Ice Lake based, though it is far more likely that they are indeed caffeinated instead.

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The final rumour for you to look at this morning is the above screenshot from Chiphell.  You will need to zoom and enhance to get the full story, however there are some interesting reveals in the legible parts of the slide.  Enjoy.

"More news from Intel this morning, this time published directly on their website. With the upcoming announcement of the 8th Generation Core next week to which Intel has already posted teasers to the media, it would seem that someone at Intel decided to add processor details and pricing into Intel’s official Price List today."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: AnandTech

Vulkan Renderer for Doom 3 BFG Source Code Published

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2017 - 09:41 PM |
Tagged: id software, vulkan, doom, Doom 3

Over the last few days, Dustin Land of id Software has been publishing commits to his vkDOOM3 GitHub repository. This project, as the name suggests, adds a Vulkan-based renderer to the game, although it’s not really designed to replace the default OpenGL implementation. Instead, the project is a learning resource, showing how a full application handles the API.

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This is quite interesting for me. While code samples can show you how a chunk of code is used in rough isolation, it’s sometimes good to see how it’s used in a broader context. For instance, when I was learning Unreal Engine 4, I occasionally searched into the Unreal Tournament repository for whatever I was learning about. Sometimes, things just don’t “click” until you see the context, especially when your question starts with “why”.

If you’re interested, check out the GitHub repo. You will need to own Doom 3 BFG Edition to actually play it, though.

Source: GitHub

What difference is it 2 you? X99 versus X299

Subject: Motherboards | August 17, 2017 - 03:18 PM |
Tagged: X99, Intel X299, Intel

There has been a trend recently in which we see rather lacklustre improvements in Intel's CPUs and chipsets which have changed the reaction of many to new releases.  When a new chip drops enthusiasts no longer immediately switch to a diet of pot noodles so they can upgrade ASAP, instead they are more likely to have to squint to see the performance difference an upgrade would provide.

[H]ard|OCP recently took a look at the differences offered between the modern X299 chipset and the three year old X99 chipset.  The new X299 chipset offers full PCI-Express 3.0 support, 24x HSIO lanes and up to 24 PCIe lanes but the small number of systems with multiple GPUs seems to be decreasing instead of increasing so perhaps those extra lanes are merely nice to talk about but are never used.  Read through the article for a look at what the differences are, and if you feel there is a compelling reason to upgrade or if X99 is good enough to last until the next generation of Intel chipset arrives.

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"New processors and another socket means a new chipset. Intel's X299 Express chipset replaces the venerable and X99 Express Chipset and updates it's HEDT platform to match it's mainstream offerings and then some. This chipset promises to be the most versatile and feature rich Intel has released to date, but is it really an improvement?"

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Cooler Master's MasterPulse MH320, bargain or bust?

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2017 - 01:28 PM |
Tagged: audio, cooler master, masterpulse MH320, gaming headset

The MasterPulse MH320 gaming headset is a mere $40 on Amazon right now and TechPowerUp wanted to determine if it was a bargain or not.  The specifications are reasonable, 40mm neodymium drivers and a 20-20,000Hz frequency response, a bi-directional microphone and 3.5mm plugs, sans USB.  In testing they found spatial positioning to be a weakness, if you depend on audio clues to detect your enemies you will be disappointed but for games which do not require this feature as well as for listening to music the MH320's are a good deal.  They were also a big fan of CM utilizing a dual headband design on a budget level headset.  For more details head on over and read the full review.

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"By releasing the MasterPulse MH320, their least-expensive gaming headset to date, Cooler Master tries to grab the attention of gamers on a very tight budget. Even though it costs a mere $40, it offers a dual-headband design, a foldable bi-directional boom microphone, and a few other interesting features."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: TechPowerUp

NVIDIA's Quadro vDWS creates Tesla powered servers

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2017 - 12:48 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, pascal, grid, tesla, Quadro vDWS

NVIDIA have updated their GRID virtual PC architecture to allow up to 24 virtual desktops, each with a 1GB desktop, doubling the previous capacity of their virtual machine tool.  Along with this increase comes a new service called Quadro vDWS which allows you to power those virtual desktops with one of their HPC cards like their Pascal-based line of Tesla GPU accelerators.  For workflows which incorporate things such as VR or photorealism this will offer a significant increase in performance; unfortunately Minesweeper will not see any improvements.  NVIDIA accompanied this launch with a new blade server, the Tesla P6 which has 16GB of memory which can be split down to 16 1GB virtual desktops.   Drop by The Inquirer for more information including on where to get this new software.

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"NVIDIA has announced a new software suite which will allow users to virtualise an operating system to turn the company's ridiculously powerful Tesla GPU servers into powerful workstations."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #463 - AMD VEGA 64, Flash Memory Summit, and more!

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2017 - 11:21 AM |
Tagged: video, T5, Samsung, RX VEGA 64, qualcomm, podcast, PC-Q39, P4800X, NX500, NGSFF, micron, Lian Li, Intel, EK Supremacy EVO, EDSFF, corsair, amd

PC Perspective Podcast #463 - 08/17/17

Join us for AMD Threadripper, Intel Rumors, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Allyn Malventano, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison, Sebastian Peak

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:37:18

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
    1. 1:26:30 Jeremy: caveat emptor
    2. 1:32:30 Ken: Prusa i3 MK2S 3D Printer (NOW IN STOCK!)
  4. Closing/outro
 

Source:

Lian Li’s new PC-Q39 tempered glass Mini-ITX (wide) tower

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 16, 2017 - 06:21 PM |
Tagged: tempered glass, PC-Q39, mini-itx, Lian Li

Lian Li have released an upgrade to the PC-Q37 with the new mini-ITX PC-Q39 with tempered glass side panel and a larger internal volume.  The aluminium case will be large enough to fit a three slot GPU, with the extra width allowing a separated second chamber to house an ATX PSU of up to 160mm. 

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In addition to the PSU there is space for a pump and reservoir for watercooling as well as mounting points for two 3.5” and one 2.5” drive, allowing you to configure an unobstructed view of your components and he almost mandatory RGB LED lightshow which they produce.  If you do chose to watercool, a radiator of up to 240mm can be mounted at the top while the bottom of the case will accommodate two 120mm fans or a single 140 fan.

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The front panel has a minimalist design, the various connectors have been moved to the top of the case.  There is now a USB 3.1 Type-C plug in addition to two USB 3.1 plugs, audio jacks and a power button.  The shield at the top of the case is removable to make it easier to mount your fans or radiator as well as making it easy to clean. 

The MSRP is $210 and it is available now at NewEgg and other fine retailers.

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Click for the full PR.

Source: Lian Li

Samsung's T5 provides a mobile storage junkies fix

Subject: Storage | August 16, 2017 - 04:03 PM |
Tagged: USB 3.1 gen 2, T5, Samsung, portable, 500gb, 2TB

Hopefully Samsung changes its naming schemes before we hit T1000 but for now, as many people know a T5 is stronger than a T3.  If you missed Al's review, you should take a peek before heading to The Tech Report to benefit from his wisdom.  With portable drives, or most drives for that matter, the metric that we care the most about is real world usage which is what Robobench is intended for.  In order to properly test this USB 3.1 Gen 2 drive, TR picked up an addin card with the most common Gen 2 chip, the ASMedia ASM1142 controller and tested the transfer speeds for both compressible and non-compressible data.  Drop by for a look at how the Samsung T5 performed.

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"Samsung has refreshed its portable SSD lineup with 64-layer V-NAND and an aluminum unibody. We take the new T5 external for a spin to see if it lives up to the legacy of the T1 and T3."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

 

Only 10 days to train up for the Fragging Frogs VLAN #16

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2017 - 01:33 PM |
Tagged: vlan, fragging frogs, gaming, kick ass

That's right fellow gamers, in just over a weeks time you will be able to once again dedicate your Saturday to a truly noble effort, fragging friends, family and strangers in the 16th Fragging Frogs VLAN party.  It kicks off at 10AM EDT and goes until the last player succumbs to weakness and falls asleep.  Lenny is hard at work organizing the event as well as gathering hardware and other goodies for the giveaways.

You can't win unless you let him know you are coming by posting to this thread and if you don't set up Teamspeak then you'll never know if you won or not, not to mention that the day is a lot more fun when you are chatting with your fellow Frogs.  The thread also lets you suggest games as well as providing valuable information on the event and getting your mods and patches set up.

Be there or be a pixellated block!

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Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

 

Source: PCPer Forums

Well that's not good, VGA RAM prices spike 30%

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2017 - 12:41 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, SK Hynix, micron, EVGA G3 850W

DigiTimes is the bearer of bad news for fans of GPUs, as the supply challenges which have marked 2017 are now spreading to GDDR5(x).  This month the price has spiked up just over 30% and that trend is going to continue into September and perhaps beyond.  This will not have an immediate effect on the MSRPs of graphics cards, not that we would notice due to the price inflation from the current mining craze however it will reduce the margins that NVIDIA and AMD receive from sales.  They do not specifically mention AMD in the article, nor HBM2, however the same companies fabricate both so there are likely to be repercussions felt by both technologies.  On the positive side, flash storage prices are reported to have stabilized; so we have that going for us.

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"August quotes for RAMs used in VGA graphics cards have risen to US$8.50, up by 30.8% from US$6.50 in July. Both RAM industry leaders Samsung Electronics and SK Hynix have allocated part of their VGA RAM production capacities to producing memories for servers and handsets, fueling the price rally."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: DigiTimes

Patriot’s Viper V570 RGB, a mouse for bargain hunting gamers

Subject: General Tech | August 15, 2017 - 03:52 PM |
Tagged: patriot, Viper V570 RGB, gaming mouse, RGB

For a $50 mouse, the Patriot Viper V570 RGB has a lot going for it.  There are weights you can use to adjust the heft of your rodent, an Avago 9800 sensor which can be adjusted from 800 to 3200 DPI and eight programmable buttons without counting the right, left and scroll wheel.  Techgage found the materials used in the mouse felt a little lower quality than other mice but not enough to overly concern them, especially considering the price though Patriot did not skimp on the feet.  Check out the full review, including the RGB, over at Techgage.

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"Have just 50 bucks to spend on a new gaming mouse, but feel anxious about the features you may have to give up? With its Viper V570 RGB, Patriot has your back. Despite its modest price, the V570 sports a weight system, RGB lighting (as its name suggests), awesome macro support, and even a solid software solution."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Techgage

Depth-sensing tech from Qualcomm challenges Apple

Subject: Mobile | August 15, 2017 - 02:30 PM |
Tagged: qualcomm, spectra, depth sensing, apple

New camera and image processing technology from Qualcomm promises to change how Android smartphones and VR headsets see the world. Depth sensing isn’t new to smartphones and tablets, first seeing significant use in Google’s Project Tango and Intel’s RealSense Technology. Tango uses a laser-based implementation that measures roundtrip times bouncing off surfaces but requires a bulky lens on the rear of the device. Early Tango phones like the Lenovo Phab 2 were hindered by large size requirements as a result. Intel RealSense was featured in the Dell Venue 8 7000 tablet and allowed the camera to adjust depth of field and focal points after the image had been capturing. It used a pair of cameras and calculated depth based on parallax mapping between them, just as the human eye works.

Modern devices like the iPhone 7 Plus and Samsung Galaxy S8 offer faux-depth perception for features like portrait photo modes. In reality, they only emulate the ability to sense depth by use different range camera lenses and don’t provide true depth mapping capability.

New technology and integration programs at Qualcomm are working to improve the performance, capability, and availability of true depth sensing technology for Android-based smartphones and VR headsets this year. For the entry-level market devices that today do not have the ability to utilize depth sensing, a passive camera module was built to utilize parallax displacement and estimate depth. This requires two matching camera lenses and a known offset distance between them. Even low-cost phones will have the ability to integrate image quality enhancements like blurred bokeh and basic mixed or augmented reality, bringing the technology to a mass market.

The more advanced integration of the Qualcomm Spectra module program provides active depth sensing with a set of three devices. A standard high resolution camera is paired with both an infrared projector and an infrared camera that are utilized for high resolution depth map creation. The technology projects an infrared image with a preset pattern into the world, invisible to the human eye, but picked up by the IR camera. The Spectra image processor on the Qualcomm Snapdragon mobile platform then measures the displacement and deformations of the pattern to determine the depth and location of the items in the physical world. This is done in real-time, at high frame rates and high resolution to create a 10,000 data point “cloud” in a virtual 3D space.

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For consumers this means more advanced security and advanced features on mobile devices. Face detection and mapping that combines the standard camera input along with the IR depth sensing combination will allow for incredibly accurate and secure authentication. Qualcomm claims that the accuracy level is high enough to prevent photos of faces and even 3D models of faces from unlocking the device thanks to interactions of human skin and eyes with IR light.

3D reconstruction of physical objects will also be possible with active depth sensing, allowing gamers to bring real items into virtual worlds. It also allows designers to accurately measure physical spaces that they can look through in full 3D. Virtual reality and augmented reality will benefit from the increased accuracy of its localization and mapping algorithms, improving the “inside-out” tracking capabilities of dedicated headsets and slot-in devices like Samsung’s Gear VR and Google Daydream.

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Though the second generation Qualcomm Spectra ISP (image sensor processor) is required for the complex compute tasks that depth sensing will create, the module program the company has created is more important for the adoption, speed of integration, and cost of the technology to potential customers. By working with companies like Sony for image sensors and integration on modules, Qualcomm has pre-qualified sets of hardware and provides calibration profiles for its licensees to select from and build into upcoming devices. These arrangements allow for Qualcomm to remove some of the burden from handset vendors, lowering development time and costs, getting depth sensing and advanced photo capabilities to Android phones faster.

It has been all but confirmed that the upcoming Apple iPhone 8 will have face detection integrated on it and the company’s push into AR (augmented reality) with iOS 11 points to a bet on depth sensing technology as well. Though Apple is letting developers build applications and integrations with the current A9 and A10 processors, it will likely build its own co-processor to handle the compute workloads that come from active depth sensing and offset power consumption concerns of using a general purpose processor.

Early leaks indicate that Apple will focus its face detection technology on a similar path to the one Qualcomm has paved: security and convenience. By using depth-based facial recognition for both login and security (as a Touch ID replacement), users will have an alternative to fingerprints. That is good news for a device that is having problems moving to a fingerprint sensor design that uses the entire screen.

It now looks like a race to integration for Android and Apple smartphones and devices. The Qualcomm Spectra ISP and module program will accelerate adoption in the large and financially variable Android market, giving handset vendors another reason to consider Qualcomm chipsets over competing solutions. Apple benefits from control over the entire hardware, software, and supply chain, and will see immediate adoption of the capabilities when the next-generation iPhone makes its debut. 

Source:

The overclocked laptop, Gigabyte's Aorus X5

Subject: Mobile | August 15, 2017 - 02:11 PM |
Tagged: X5, i7-7820HK, gtx 1070, gigabyte, gaming laptop, factory overclocked, aorus

The Aorus X5 gaming laptop comes with a 300MHz overclock on the i7-7820HK, with a top frequency of 4.2 GHz and a 50 MHz overclock on the GTX 1070 base clock.  This is not usual for gaming laptops, which tend to be thermally stressed at stock clocks, which shows the benefit of this particular design.  Gigabyte obviously did some serious testing, Techspot tried manual overclocking but could only squeeze another 100MHz from the CPU and another 50MHz from the GPU while remaining stable.  The CPU overclock did have some effect, however there was little real performance gained from the extra 50MHz on the GPU as it runs warm enough that thermal throttling is the limitation.  Drop by to see how well this 2.5kg, 15.6" G-Sync capable laptop performs in Techspot's full review.

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"Gigabyte's enthusiast gamer brand, Aorus, never skimps on hardware and the brand new Aorus X5 v7 is no exception: we're looking at an overclockable quad-core i7-7820HK CPU, GTX 1070 graphics,a high-resolution G-Sync display, 32GB RAM and for storage comprises an M.2 SSD and a hard drive."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

More Mobile Articles

Source: Techspot

Qualcomm's new Spectra Module Program and ISPs

Subject: General Tech | August 15, 2017 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: qualcomm, spectra

Back in May Ryan covered the hardware that comprises Qualcomm's new SOCs, the Snapdragon 660 and 630 which will feature the new Spectra Image Signal Processors.  Today, The Tech Report have published a look at how these powerful new ISPs will change the mobile market.  The Spectra Module Program has been created to offer the a complete package to hardware developers instead of having them create the software themselves and customize the hardware for that software.  Drop by to take a look at the various sensor packages Qualcomm will be offering right here.

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"Qualcomm's next-gen Spectra image signal processors bring extensive depth-sensing capabilities to the company's mobile processing platforms. We explore how these capabilities could shape the next generation of mobile devices."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Considering a move to a high powered Vega-tarian lifestyle?

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 14, 2017 - 03:49 PM |
Tagged: vega 64 liquid, vega 64, vega 56, rx vega, radoen, amd

The reviews of AMD's two and a half new cards are in and they have a lot to say about AMD's current focus for GPU development.  They have not gone green with this new architecture; but be honest with yourself about how much think about the environment when absorbed in a gaming session on a 4k monitor.  The Vega 64 and 56 do require far more energy than Pascal cards and do produce more noise, however keep in mind that third party air cooling or a better radiator may help mitigate the issue. 

The real question is the price, while there will be some challenges with the two Vega 64 cards the Vega 56 is certainly a competitor to the GTX 1070.  If the mining craze dies down to the point where the prices of these two cards approach MSRP AMD offers a compelling choice for those who also want a new monitor.  Freesync displays sell at a significantly lower price than comparable G-Sync displays, even before you start to look at the new bundle program AMD has introduced. 

Since we know you have already been through Ryan's review, perhaps you would be interested in what our framerating friends over at The Tech Report thought.  If not, there are plenty of other reviews below.

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"AMD's long-awaited Radeon RX Vega 64 and RX Vega 56 graphics cards are finally ready to make their way into gamers' hands. We go hands-on to see how they perform."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

A look at Surfacegates past and present

Subject: General Tech | August 14, 2017 - 01:32 PM |
Tagged: surface, microsoft, Skylake

Paul Thurrott has posted a reasoned look at the recent negative rating Consumer Reports have handed the Microsoft Surface and Intel's reaction to it.  There were problems with the release of Skylake powered Surface products and Microsoft initially laid the blame fully on Intel; which proved awkward when they conversed with Lenovo about the problems Skylake caused as Lenovo had not had a similar experience.  Instead the reliability issues stemmed from Microsoft's drivers and when you break down the issues, most had to do with frozen screens and unresponsive touch interfaces. 

Microsoft have since rectified this issue and the new Surface products do not have the same issues as the previous models.   There is an interesting bit of speculation in the article about the fallout of this issue, it could be that this was the driving force behind Microsoft's sudden push to have Windows 10 run on ARM processors.  For more on that as well as some interesting background on how companies measure the success of their products you should head over to read the full article.  At the very least you can bask in the glory of the quote from an internal memo at the beginning of the article, describing your purchase as an "ownership journey with our products".

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"Thurrott.com has seen an internal Microsoft memo that indicates that the software giant is readying a broader campaign to undercut this past week’s news from Consumer Reports. It also provides greater insight into why Microsoft believes the Consumer Reports recommendations are incorrect."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Thurrott

TinkerTry Gets a Real Look at the Intel Optane SSD DC P4800X

Subject: Storage | August 14, 2017 - 08:09 AM |
Tagged: P4800X, XPoint, NVMe, HHHL, Optane, Intel, ssd, DC

We reviewed the Intel P4800X - Intel's first 3D XPoint SSD, back in April of this year. The one thing missing from that review was product pictures. Sure we had stock photos, but we did not have the product in hand due to the extremely limited number of samples and the need for Intel to be able to make more real-time updates to the hardware based on our feedback during the testing process (reviewers making hardware better FTW!). After the reviews were done, sample priority shifted to the software vendors who needed time to further develop their code bases to take better advantage of the very low latency that Optane can offer. One of those companies is VMware, and one of our friends from over there was able to get some tinker time with one of their samples.

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Paul whipped up a few videos showing the installation process as well as timing a server boot directly from the P4800X (something we could not do in our review since we were testing on a remote server). I highly encourage those interested in the P4800X (and the upcoming consumer versions of the same) to check out the article on TinkerTry. I also recommend those wanting to know what Optane / XPoint is and how it works to check out our article here.