Banning Talos worship might be worth it, POWER9 still lags behind

Subject: Processors | July 6, 2018 - 03:16 PM |
Tagged: IBM, power9, talos 2, EPYC, xeon

Phoronix were recently given access to three servers running three different POWER9 Talos II configurations and compared them to EPYC and Xeon.  On paper these systems look amazing, thanks to the architecture supporting four threads per core; they tested  a dual 4-core Talos II system, a Talos II Lite with a single 22-core CPU and a Talos II with dual 18-core processors with thread counts of 32, 88, and 144 respectively. 

There were certainly usage scenarios where the dual 18 core system could outpace even the EPYC 7601 but could not surpass the dual Xeon Gold 6138 system.  The review covers a fair amount of benchmarks and configurations but doesn't begin to scratch the surface of wide variety of server configurations you need to consider before abandoning POWER9 altogether but the key metric, performance per dollar, shows these architecture solidly in the middle of the pack.

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"Back in April we were able to run some IBM POWER9 benchmarks with remote access to the open-source friendly Talos II systems by Raptor Computer Systems. We were recently allowed remote access again to a few different configurations of this libre hardware with three different POWER9 processor combinations. Here are those latest benchmarks compared to Intel Xeon and AMD EPYC server processors."

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Source: Phoronix

Should you wait for the i9-8088K anniversary instead?

Subject: Processors | June 11, 2018 - 03:50 PM |
Tagged: Intel, i7-8086k, coffee lake-s, 8086

Now, before you decided to comment on Ken's i7-8086K article, consider he is not the only one who has encountered issues with Intel's Anniversary silicon.  The Tech Report offers succinct advice in their review as well "the i7-8086K isn't worth the $75 upcharge over the i7-8700K at stock speeds."  They manually overclocked the chip and found the same 5.1GHz limit, as the processors are thermally identical regardless of the handpicked artisan silicon inside the i7-8086K.  The 5GHz stock speed advertised does not seem to be available right out of the box but instead requires a bit of work.

On the other hand, if you like the idea of an Anniversary model CPU and would enjoy manually overclocking, the extra $75 might mean very little to you.

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"Intel's Core i7-8086K is the company's first CPU with a 5-GHz Turbo speed out of the box. We dig deep to see whether this chip has the cachet to live up to its limited-edition billing."

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What's the horsepower equivalent of -185C? The i7-8086K passes 7GHz

Subject: General Tech, Processors | June 8, 2018 - 01:39 PM |
Tagged: overclocking, Intel, i7-8086k, der8auer

Der8auer is at it again, this time pushing Intel's Anniversary Edition i7-8086K quickly passing 7GHz in initial overclocking, showing just how well picked these Core i7-8700K's are.  He pushed the core voltage up past 1.85V and used an impressive amount of LN to accomplish this feat but he feels there is more to this processor.  Having had more time to work on overclocking 8700K's he has successfully pushed them to 7.3GHz, so in theory the 8086K should be able to beat that.  Take a look at the video posted on the Inquirer to see this happen.

You can also try to get your hands on one for free here.

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"The processor, announced this week at Computex, commemorates 40 years of x86 computing and out of the box can hit 5GHz on a single core without overclocking via the chip's boost frequency."

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Source: The Inquirer

Zen 2 "Rome" EPYC CPU on 7nm on track for 2018 sampling, 2019 release

Subject: Processors | June 5, 2018 - 11:22 PM |
Tagged: Zen 2, Zen, rome, amd

The first whiffs of Zen 2 are finally reaching us. During the AMD press conference at Computex today CEO Dr. Lisa Su stood on stage and held up the first public showing of Rome, the codename for AMD’s next-generation EPYC enterprise processor family.

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Rome is exciting because it will be the first 7nm high-performance processor in the market, and it makes the 10nm production problems that Intel is having all the more troublesome for the blue-chip giant. And because Rome will be socket compatible with the currently shipping EPYC systems, there is a huge potential for market penetration through 2019.

AMD stated that it would be sampling Rome-based Zen 2 processors to partners in the second half of 2018, with launch in 2019. AMD does have silicon back in the labs, up and running. No more timing detail was given than that.

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The competitive statement of AMD putting timeframes on its 7nm server processors, rumored to be going up to 64-cores PER SOCKET, while Intel struggles with its move to 10nm, is significant. AMD still targets a 5% market share for server processors by the end of the year, but it might be 2019 that proves to be a more significant year for the company’s drive back into the server space.

Source: AMD

Computex 2018: AMD previews 32-core Threadripper CPUs for Q3

Subject: Processors | June 5, 2018 - 11:03 PM |
Tagged: Threadripper, ryzen, amd, 32-core, 12nm

During the keynote address at Computex in Taipei, AMD SVP Jim Anderson was on stage to showcase a preview of the upcoming 2000-series of Threadripper processors for high-end consumer PCs. The Threadripper brand already made waves last year by bringing 16-core and 32-thread designs to the market for the very first time, improving performance for extreme productivity tasks, rendering, development, video, and more.

We knew that the 2000-series was coming this year, based on the 12nm process from GlobalFoundries, just as the Ryzen 2000-series uses, but we have narrowed the availability time frame to Q3 of 2018.

But the big story at the show was that this generation would see a doubling of the maximum core count on Threadripper. Yes, you will be able to buy 32-core and 64-thread AMD Threadripper CPUs later this year!!

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Hot on the heels of the impressive, but dubiously cooled, Intel 28-core demo yesterday, AMD is clearly intent on continuing momentum that is has built throughout 2017. AMD didn’t show us any Cinebench numbers, but my understanding is that the demo provided was completely air cooled. Intel’s…not so much. While impressive to see 28-cores at 5 GHz yesterday, more impressive is a 32-core machine with a system design I would be willing to implement.

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No more details on pricing, performance, or platform were made available during the keynote, but we’ll be asking those questions as the week progresses.

Get ready for 32-cores!!

Source: AMD

Computex 2018: Intel demos 28-core processor at 5 GHz

Subject: Processors | June 5, 2018 - 11:40 AM |
Tagged: X399, X-Series, Intel, HEDT, 28 core

If you thought running at 5 GHz was neat with a 6-core part, Intel had another surprise for you last night. As part of its Computex keynote, the company demonstrated a 28-core processor running at 5 GHz on all cores, planned for the HEDT segment sometime before the end of 2018.

We don't have a lot of detail on this demo, including what socket this is using, whether this is a single monolithic die design or a multi-chip package using EMIB, or if this is will cost you more than your current domicile to purchase.

intel28core.jpg

Image courtesy The Verge

It showed a score of 7334 on Cinebench R15. Think about that - the 18-core Core i9-7980XE is our current stock leader in this test with a result of 3346. That means this 28-core processor demo was 2.19x faster than the current fastest part on the market!! 

intel28corecb.jpg

Image courtesy Tom's Hardware

All of the unknown factors make it slightly less exciting, to be honest. What power draw was it running at? Is this viable for a consumer platform, in reality? Is 5 GHz a possibility for us mere mortals? Clearly if you are in need of extreme multi-threading capability and performance for rendering, encoding, or mega-tasking, it appears Intel may have the best solution available come this holiday season.

UPDATE 6/6/18: It has now been confirmed by people on the ground in Taipei that the Intel 28-core demo was a complex feat. The motherboards were built by ASUS and Gigabyte, modifications of a server-class LGA3647 socket board that required a 32-phase power system, and a 1HP (horsepower) water chiller and refrigerant to drop the liquid to a cool 4 degrees Celsius. The processor is a single-die part, basically a Xeon Scalable Platinum 8180, that has a list price of $10,000.

Obviously this is not a configuration that any reasonable consumer, even the crazy ones really, would be willing to employ. It means motherboards with the X299 chipset will not be compatible with this part as it requires a new socket. It also means that clock speeds for real-world designs will be much lower, likely a Gigahertz or more. 

There are a lot of questions to poke around about before the end of the year if we are truly going to understand Intel's plans for the enthusiast platform at the end of 2018.

Source: Intel

Computex 2018: Intel announces Core i7-8086K officially, 6 cores at 5 GHz

Subject: Processors | June 5, 2018 - 11:20 AM |
Tagged: kaby lake, Intel, core i7, 8086K

It should come as no real surprise to those of you that read PC Perspective, but Intel officially unveiled the new Core i7-8086K processor during its keynote last night in Taipei at Computex. The specs are right in line with expectations, offering a 6-core / 12-thread chip with a peak Turbo clock speed of 5.0 GHz.

  Core i7-8700K Core i7-8086K
Architecture Coffee Lake Coffee Lake
Process Tech 14nm++ 14nm++
Cores/Threads 6/12 6/12
Base Clock 3.7 GHz 4.0 GHz
Turbo Clock 4.7 GHz 5.0 GHz
Cache 12MB 12MB
Memory Support DDR4-2666 DDR4-2666
PCIe Lanes 16 16
TDP 95 watts 95 watts (probably)
Socket LGA115x LGA115x
Price $349 $??

Full Intel Ark Listing

The Core i7-8086K is a limited edition part with just 50,000 expected to be built, in celebration of the company's 50th anniversary and the 40th anniversary of the original Intel 8086 x86 processor. Pricing hasn't been released, but Intel is running a sweepstakes to give away 8,086 of the CPUs and it lists $425 as the value in the fine print, so that seems like a good guess.

8080k.png

The 300 MHz increases in base and Turbo clock speeds is impressive while sitting inside the same 95 watt TDP. We are eager to get one in for testing ourselves and see how that works in practice, though the limited edition nature of the part makes it a bit less interesting in the long run. (We were considering moving our GPU testbed to this for example, but using a part that may not be available for replication of our data in the future seems like a bad idea.)

I am sure many were hoping this limited edition part would be, or would be in addition to, an 8-core processor launch at Computex, but it doesn't appear that is in the cards.

Source: Intel

Report: Intel i7-8086K Anniversary Edition CPU Listed by Retailers

Subject: Processors | May 30, 2018 - 11:18 AM |
Tagged: VideoCardz, rumor, report, processor, Intel, history, cpu, anniversary edition, 8086K, 8086

The 40th anniversary of the original Intel 8086 microprocessor launch is just days away (June 8), and ahead of this VideoCardz.com has posted screen captures of online listings for the rumored 8086 anniversary CPU - the Core i7-8086K.

VideoCardz_8080K_Screens.png

(Screen captures above sourced from VideoCardz.com)

From VideoCardz.com:

"Some retailers have already started listing the new SKU on their websites, indicating 70 USD/EUR premium over i7-8700K (~480/470 EUR). Not much is known at this point, but the CPU is rumored to be 5.0 GHz chip out of the box. It is, however, still expected to be a 6-core SKU."

Beyond the online retailer listings accidentally posted early, presumably, not much is known; though it seems fair to conclude that this may indeed be a higher-clocked version of the current i7-8700K and would therefore remain a 6-core/12-thread product. Intel is going to be at Computex beginning June 5 where they "will showcase how the company is powering the future of computing" so might we hear an announcement of a new product on the eve of the 8086 anniversary? The possibility is too logical to ignore.

Source: VideoCardz

Spectre 3a and Spectre 4 Unfortunately Announced...

Subject: Processors | May 22, 2018 - 07:51 PM |
Tagged: x86, arm, Intel, amd, spectre

Security researchers at Microsoft and Google have found two new vulnerabilities along the lines of the Spectre and Meltdown bugs from early January. These are being called Spectre 3a (Rogue System Register Read) and Spectre 4 (Speculative Store Bypass). Like last time, hardware and software vendors have addressed the issues, which will be coming down via OS updates.

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Naturally, James Bond will steal information when there's Intel Inside.

On the AMD side of things, they claim that the Spectre 4 vulnerability will be patched as far back as Bulldozer (2011). They also claim that no action will be necessary, at least to their knowledge, for Spectre 3a on their x86 parts. They have also released a short, five-page whitepaper discussing the issue.

On the Intel side of things… a security bulletin has been posted for CPUs as far back as Nehalem. They don’t exactly clarify which processors are susceptible to which vulnerabilities, but they acknowledge that both Spectre 3a and Spectre 4 touch something on their product stack to some extent. They have submitted a beta microcode update to OS vendors, which they expect to be production ready “in the coming weeks”.

ARM is also affected to some extent. They have published a table that lists which architectures are vulnerable to what exploit. Interestingly, there are some processors that are vulnerable to 3a, but not 4, and others that are vulnerable to 4, but not 3a (and, of course, some that are vulnerable to both and neither). Since these exploits are based on optimizations gone awry, you would think that it would have built up over time, but that doesn’t seem to be the case. The only pattern I could notice is that Variant 4 only affects newish 64-bit ARM processors. I don’t know if that’s a red herring, or a well-known corollary of the bug that I just don’t know enough about, but it’s about all that I can see.

Regardless, expect patches soon, which might, again, lower performance by some amount.

AMD Releases Updated Raven Ridge Desktop APU Graphics Drivers

Subject: Graphics Cards, Processors | May 18, 2018 - 04:33 PM |
Tagged: Vega, ryzen, raven ridge, Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition, r5 2400g, r3 2200g, amd

Today, AMD released the first driver update for the desktop Raven Ridge APUs since their launch in February of this year.

The new Q2 2018 drivers are based on AMD's current Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition release and bring features such as ReLive and the Radeon overlay to the Vega-powered desktop platform.

adrenalin-74.jpg

We haven't had a lot of time to look for potential performance enhancements this driver brings yet, but we did do a quick 3DMark run on our Ryzen 5 2400G with memory running at DDR4-3200.

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Here, we see healthy gains of around 5% in 3DMark Firestrike for the new driver. While I wouldn't expect big gains for older titles, newer titles that have come out since the initial Raven Ridge drive release in February will see the biggest gains.

We are still eager to see the mobile iterations of AMD's Raven Ridge processors get updated drivers, as notebooks such as the HP Envy X360 have not been updated since they launched in November of last year.

It's good to see progress from AMD on this front, but they must work harder to unify the graphics drivers of their APU products into the mainstream graphics driver releases if they want those products to be taken seriously as gaming options.

Source: AMD

While we await Ryzen 5 Pro 2500U benchmarks, here's some Ryzen 5 2600 performance for you

Subject: Processors | May 16, 2018 - 02:46 PM |
Tagged: amd, ryzen 2, Ryzen 5 2600, Core i5-8400

There are no benchmarks of the new Ryzen Pro series to offer as of yet, so why not check out a few hundred benchmarks pitting the $190 Ryzen 5 2600 against the $180 Core i5-8400?  Techspot takes you on a tour of games, from ARK Survival Evolved through PUBG to Warhammer Total War to see what effect your choice of processor has when gaming on a GTX 1080 Ti.  When the dust settled there were two obvious choices for prospective buyers.  For those who want a simple solution, the i5-8400 makes sense as it will offer decent performance right out of the box, no fiddling required.  On the other hand, for those who are not completely boring, the Ryzen 5 2600, overclocked to 4.2GHz paired with DDR4-3400 is clearly better overall. 

Check out the performance of your favourite games in the full review and then scream about the unfairness of it all below.

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"For the past few weeks we've been busy benchmarking AMD's Ryzen 5 2600 and Intel's Core i5-8400. For testing we have 36 games on the menu, each tested at 720p, 1080p and 1440p using the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti. That is, 324 individual tests, three times each... almost 1,000 benchmark runs, so grab a drink, some snacks and get comfortable."

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Source: TechSpot

Two scoops of Ryzen, eat on the go or at your desk

Subject: General Tech, Processors | May 15, 2018 - 01:49 PM |
Tagged: ryzen pro, amd, APU, ryzen 7 pro 2700u, Ryzen 5 Pro 2500U, Ryzen 3 Pro 2300U, Ryzen 5 Pro 2400G, Ryzen 5 Pro 2400GE, Ryzen 3 Pro 2200G

AMD have extended both their processor lineup as well as their names, by sticking Pro into the already verbose Ryzen 2 series, and added another letter to pay attention to as well.   The 2xxxU series are mobile APUs which you won't see running around in the wild, the 2xxxG desktop series you certainly will, however there is also an E you need to pay attention to. 

The Ryzen 5 Pro 2400G is a 65W part which will offer four multi-threaded cores topping out at 3.9GHz, with 11 Vega CUs and ships with the Wraith Stealth cooler. The Ryzen 5 Pro 2400GE is almost as similar as the name but tops out at 3.8GHz, also has 11 Vega CUs and sports an impressive TDP of 35W, which may be part of the reason why it doesn't ship with a cooler. 

The series looks to offer a great choice for someone building a machine without a GPU installed, whether they intend to add one at a later time or not.  The naming conventions being used by Intel and AMD are getting far too easy to confuse already, without adding possible confusion within single product lines.  Let's hope this does not continue for too long.  The Inquirer lists all the models, mobile and desktop, on this page.

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"Alongside the usual specs, the chips all have the built-in security and onboard encryption features of the Ryzen Pro CPUs, designed to make them appeal for commercial and enterprise use."

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Source: The Inquirer

Precisely what are AMD's XFR 2 and Overdrive?

Subject: Processors | May 11, 2018 - 02:43 PM |
Tagged: amd, ryzen, xfr2, precision boost 2, Precision Boost Overdrive

Whether you have had a chance to play around with a new Ryzen processor or not, you might benefit from more information on what XFR2 and Precision Boost 2 are and what they are not.  [H]ard|OCP spent some time to write an article that dispels the rumours which have been spread, especially the fact that these are both unreleased at the moment.  Together they will provide support for Precision Boost Overdrive, which could be supported by Ryzen Zen+ CPUs on an X470 motherboard, at least in theory.  When enabled it will utilize the ability of the new Ryzen Master software to monitor your motherboards VRM usage and if it sees it is below it capacity it will relax the vCore limiter on your CPU allowing more juice to flow in which can be used to increase the frequency of your Zen + chip.  It will be interesting to see how effective this is, but for now all we can do is read about it.

master.PNG

"We wanted to put together a quick overview about what Precision Boost 2 and XFR2 are NOT about. It seems that slides leaked, and faked, earlier in the 2nd generation Ryzen's development have clouded some people's understanding on what features are included, but more important which features are not."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Microsoft releases 64-bit SDK for Windows on Arm platforms

Subject: Processors, Mobile | May 8, 2018 - 07:30 PM |
Tagged: windows on snapdragon, windows on arm, microsoft, 64-bit

During the Microsoft BUILD developer conference, the Windows initiative for Qualcomm and Arm processors got a much needed shot in the arm (heh) with announced support for a 64-bit SDK.

Visual Studio 15.8 Preview 1 contains the early version of these tools that will give developers the ability to build native 64-bit Arm apps. Microsoft claims that this “represents the next step in the evolution of the Always Connected PC running Windows 10 on ARM” and I couldn’t agree more.

qcwindows.jpg

This gives software developers the ability to target Arm-based processors like the Snapdragon 835 from Qualcomm natively without forcing users to depend on emulation layers provided by Microsoft. While the emulation layer is critical for compatibility, it does slow performance quite a bit compared to native-running code.

While the Windows Store already supports ARM32 packages, ARM64 packages will be supported “soon” based on what Microsoft is telling us. Even more interesting, Microsoft is promoting the ability for developers to post the Win32 (non-Store) ARM64 version of software online, rather than waiting for the Store apps to be approved.

The Microsoft website has details on how developers can start this integration. Qualcomm has its own documentation as well.

From my own view, this a necessary step for Microsoft to take, even if it does seem later than many would have liked. The benefits of Windows 10 running on Snapdragon and Arm are real and substantial, but being hindered by performance due to emulation was always known to be a speedbump. Getting developers access to better, and easier to use, Arm compilation is the next step.

I would also like to see Microsoft take a more proactive role in pushing developers to offer both versions of software. MS simply cannot take a passive, backseat approach to the Always On, Always Connected PC initiative and have it be a success.

Source: Microsoft

Intel Kicks Kaby Lake-X CPUs to the Curb

Subject: Processors | May 1, 2018 - 10:25 AM |
Tagged: kaby lake-x, Intel, 7740x, 7640x

So, do you remember the Kaby Lake-X processors that launched along side the Skylake-X parts back on June 19, 2017. These are (were) 14nm+ processors built into the LGA2066 socket as a part of the X299 chipset launch. They shipped as the Core i7-7740X (4-core, 8-thread) and Core i5-7640X (4-core, 4-thread) and at the time I had this to say about them:

These are very…interesting CPUs. They do not offer new features compared to the Core i7-7700K or Core i5-7600K, but run at barely higher clocks (100 MHz on the base on the 7740X for example). They don’t see more PCIe integration, they don’t have larger caches. They are basically the same Kaby Lake design we have come to know previously but in a new package and prepped for a new set of motherboards. Is that an advantage? It’s hard to know yet, but in general, the X299 motherboard market is going to be more expensive than the Z270 motherboard market, meaning you are going to pay more in total to own this CPU. Does the added TDP give us more thermal headroom for overclocking? Maybe the new heat spreader? I’m not sure and Intel hasn’t said yet. But what they have stated is that they wanted to offer the option to consumers that wanted the “absolute fastest gaming processor” with the best clock speeds at a reasonable price.

7740x.jpg

Even in June, the value and positioning of the Kaby Lake-X processor was a mystery. Well Intel has fixed all of that today by announced end-of-life for both of those processors.

7740x-eol.png

Intel's language in the release is kind of interesting: "Market demand for the products listed in the "Products Affected/Intel Ordering Codes" tables below have shifted to other Intel products." Yeah, I bet it has. 

These were parts without a real audience, and their creation was a consistent mystery to the enthusiast market Intel targeted. For many, it was a honest sign that Intel has lost track of what the PC market was asking for. At least the short lifespan of the pair indicates that Intel got the message loud and clear.

If you are so inclined, you can still pick up the 7740X and 7640X for a while longer. Here is the table of Kaby Lake-X's remaining life.

7740x-eol2.png

You can read the entire Intel document here if you'd like. 

Source: Intel

The number of good game streamers is Ryzen

Subject: Processors | April 30, 2018 - 02:54 PM |
Tagged: Ryzen 7 2700X, Ryzen 5 2600X, ryzen 2, amd

The Tech Report tested the gaming prowess of the new Ryzen 2 chips in a variety of games at 1080p; as the 1080 Ti they used in all the test systems equalled the playing field so that the CPU performance could been seen.  If you game at higher resolutions, then the performance delta is moot as it is your GPU which is handling the load but at 1080p gaming, CPU and DDR frequency matters.  While the new chips did not manage to surpass Intel's they closed the gap noticeably compared to the initial generation of Ryzens and they were capable of doing something Intel's offerings simply can't.  Those who like to stream their games while they play would do well to consider the Ryzen 7 2700X and Ryzen 7 1800X as they offered a significantly better experience and were the only ones capable of a decent stream of the latest Deus Ex game. 

2700xinboard.jpg

"AMD's second-generation Ryzen CPUs have impressive productivity chops, but do they have game? We ran the Ryzen 7 2700X and Ryzen 5 2600X through our high-refresh-rate gaming and streaming gauntlet to find out."

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AMD Announces Q1 2018 Results

Subject: Processors | April 25, 2018 - 09:45 PM |
Tagged: Zen+, Vega, TSMC, ryzen, Results, Q1 2018, Polaris, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, financials, amd, 7nm, 12nm

Today AMD announced their latest financial results for Q1 2018. We expected it to be a good quarter with their guidance earlier this year, but I doubt many thought it would be as strong as it turned out to be. AMD posted revenue of $1.65 billion with a net income of $81 million. This is up from the expected $1.57 billion that analysts expected from what is typically a slow quarter. This is up 40% from Q1 2017 and its $1.18 billion and up 23% from Q4 2017.

amd_logo_2.png

There are multiple reasons behind this revenue growth. The compute and graphics segment lead the way with $1.12B of revenue. The entire year of 2017 AMD had released parts seemingly nonstop since March and the introduction of Ryzen. Q1 continued this trend with the release of the first Ryzen APUs with Vega Graphics introducing the 2000 series. AMD also ramped up production of the newly released Zen+ Ryzen chips and started shipping those out to retailers and partners alike. Initial mobile Ryzen parts were also introduced and shipped with SKUs being also shipped to partners who have yet to announce and release products based on these chips. Finally the strength of the Radeon graphics chips in both gaming and blockchain applications allowed them a tremendous amount of sellthrough throughout 2017 and into 2018. AMD estimates that 10% of the quarter was due to blockchain demand.

Enterprise, Embedded, and Semi-Custom had a revenue of $532 million, which is lower than most analysts expected. Semi-Custom in particular has seen a decline over the past few quarters with the release and saturation of the market of the latest console platforms utilizing AMD designed chips. It appears as though much of the contract is front loaded in terms of revenue with royalties tapering off over time as sales decrease. AMD did have some significant wins, namely providing Intel with Vega based GPUs to be integrated with Intel’s Kaby Lake-G based units. These declines were offset by the shipment of EPYC based processors that are slowly ramping and being shipped to partners to be integrated into server platforms later this year. We have seen a handful of wins from companies like Dell EMC, but AMD is still slowly re-entering the market that they were forced to abandon with their previous, outdated Opteron products. AMD expects to reach mid-single digit marketshare during 2019, but for now they are just getting off the ground with this platform.

gaap_results.PNG

The company is not standing still or resting on their laurels after the successful and heralded launch of the latest Ryzen 2000 series chips based on the Zen+ architecture. It is aggressively ramping their mobile chips featuring the Zen/Vega combination and have some 25 product wins being released throughout late spring and summer. Overall partners have some 60 products either shipping or will ship later this year featuring Ryzen based CPUs.

There is some fear that AMD will see its GPU sales throughput be impacted by the recent drop of cryptocurrency value. Several years back with the Bitcoin crash we saw a tremendous amount of secondhand product being sold and GPU revenues for the company tanked. AMD is a bit more optimistic about the upcoming quarter as they expect the current cryptocurrency/blockchain market is much more robust and people will be holding onto these cards to mine other products/workloads rather than drop them on eBay. My thought here is that we will see a rise in cards available on the secondary/used market, but quite a bit might be offset by latent gaming demand that has been held back due the outrageous prices of GPUs over the past year. People that have been waiting for prices to get back to MSRP or below will then buy. This could be further enhanced if memory prices start to drop, providing more affordable DDR4 and flash for SSDs.

The company is also forging ahead with advanced process technology. They have recently received silicon back from TSMC’s 7nm process and it looks to be a Vega based product. The rumor surrounding this is that it will be more of a compute platform initially rather than gaming oriented. Later this year AMD expects to receive new EPYC silicon, but it looks as though this will be from GLOBALFOUNDRIES 7nm process. AMD wants to be flexible in terms of manufacturing, but they have a long history with GLOBALFOUNDRIES when it comes to CPU production. The two companies work closely together to make sure the process and CPU design match up as cleanly as possible to allow products such as Zen to reach market successfully. The GPU arm is obviously more flexible here as they have a history with multiple foundry partners throughout the past two decades.

nongaap_results.PNG

AMD has set an aggressive, but achievable, timetable of product releases that is initially focusing on the CPU side but would logically be transitioning to the GPU side. Zen+ is out on time and has met with acclaim from consumers and reviewers alike. The latest GPU products are comparable in performance to what NVIDIA has to offer, though they are less power efficient for that level of performance. The “pipecleaner” Vega on 7nm will pave the way towards Navi based products that look to be introduced next year. AMD could possibly refresh Vega on 12nm, but so far there has been no concrete information that such a product exists. They may very well continue to rely on current Polaris and Vega products throughout the rest of this year while focusing on Navi efforts to have a more competitive part come 2019.

Q2 2018 looks to be another successful quarter for AMD. The company’s outlook calls for revenue in the $1.725 billion range, plus or minus $50 million. AMD expects continued growth in all Ryzen product lines and greater throughput of EPYC based products as companies test and release products based on that platform. The GPU market could remain flat, but will most likely decline. That decline will be more than covered by the sell-through of the Ryzen line from top to bottom.

AMD improved their margin by an impressive 4%. Going from 32% to 36% showed the strength and higher ASPs of both CPU and GPU products. AMD expects another 1% increase over the next quarter. While these are good numbers for AMD, they do not match the 58%+ for NVIDIA and Intel when it comes to their margins. AMD certainly has a lot of room for improvement, and a richer product stack will allow them to achieve greater ASPs and see a rise in their overall margins. If EPYC becomes more successful, then we could see another significant improvement in margins for the company.

AMD is getting back to where they belong in terms of product placement, competitiveness, and financial performance. The company has seen a huge improvement year on year and hopes to continue that with a rich product stack that addresses multiple areas of computing. AI and machine learning is ramping up in the company in terms of software support as they feel their CPUs and GPUs are already good enough to handle the workloads. As more money comes in, they can afford to diversify and create a wider product base to compete in more markets. So far Lisa Su has been very, very successful in helping pull AMD from the ashes to the competitive situation that they currently find themselves in.

 

Source: AMD

AMD Clarifies Warranty Terms for Ryzen CPU use with Third-Party Coolers

Subject: Processors | April 25, 2018 - 02:42 PM |
Tagged: ryzen 7, ryzen 5, ryzen, Pinnacle Ridge, amd

For those of you that missed it, there was a bit of controversy this week, when a Reddit user found a support page on AMD's website which stated that use of any other "heatsink/fan" than the included one with AMD "Processor-in-Box" products would invalidate their warranty.

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As you might imagine, this caused some confusion and concern from owners and potential purchasers of Ryzen CPUs. How would AMD be able to tell if you were using a third-party cooler? What about the Ryzen 1000 series SKUs that didn't come with coolers?

As it turns out, this was an older support page that does not accurately reflect the warranty of modern AMD processors. AMD has since updated the warranty page to provide clarification.

Now, the page reads that the warranty shall be null and void if the processor "is used with any heatsink/fan (HSF) that does not support operation of the AMD processor in conformance with AMD’s publicly available specifications."

Kudos to the community who put the spotlight on this potentially misleading support page, and AMD for providing quick and decisive clarification on their actual warranty policies. 

Source: AMD

Rumor: Intel 40th Anniversary CPU. Core i7-8086K

Subject: Processors | April 24, 2018 - 08:56 PM |
Tagged: Intel, coffee lake s, coffee lake, 8086

I kind-of hope that this is true… for the pun alone.

What do you get when the following three things happen: the 40th anniversary of your introductory part, a product line that can contain your original products model number, and, of course, strong competition from your primary competitor? Maybe the Intel Core i7-8086K. Maybe an elaborate internet hoax.

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Image Credit: DDAA117 via WCCFTech

The rumor claims that it will be a slightly up-clocked Core i7-8700K. It will retain the 6 cores, 12 threads, 12MB of L3 cache, and 95W TDP, but the core will be clocked at 4.0 GHz (up from 3.7) and it can boost on a single core up to maybe 5.1 GHz. Basically, if true, it sounds like Intel cherry-picked a few high-performing dies out of Coffee Lake-S and set them aside for a promotion around the Computex or E3 time frame.

From a consumer standpoint? The last anniversary processor was a great deal, so pricing will become the deciding factor. If you were interested in the Core i7-8700K, then you might want to wait and see whether this slight notch above is true.

Source: WCCFTech

Intel Technical Documentation outs 8-Core Coffee Lake-S Processor

Subject: Processors | April 16, 2018 - 10:02 AM |
Tagged: coffee lake, coffee lake s, 8700k, Z370, Z390, 6+2, 8+2

The eventual release of an Intel "Z390" chipset and 8-core Coffee Lake-S processor seem to be almost an inevitability after all of the leaks we've had about these potential parts.

One more piece of evidence was brought to our attention recently, as spotted by an eagle-eyed user on Reddit. Intel's Technical Documentation website now seems to contain documents referencing an unreleased "Coffee Lake S 8+2" product.

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In Intel nomenclature, 8+2 would refer to 8 CPU cores, plus 2 integrated GPU cores. For example, the current 6-core i7-8700K processor is referred to as a 6+2 processor configuration. Hence, the 8+2 processor being referenced here would be a sibling to the 8700K, with two more CPU cores. 

Unfortunately, the actual documents are hidden behind an Intel login page, so we are unable to view them in full, but rather only have titles and short descriptions of their contents.

Given their recent appetite for the "i9" brand as the highest-end configurations, as we saw on the recent Coffee Lake-H notebook processor launch, I would expect this to be the first mainstream Intel desktop processor to carry the "i9" branding.

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Additionally, we see documents referring to design aspects of both the existing Coffee Lake-S 6+2 part (8700K) and this new 8+2 part. This brings us hope that Z370 motherboards will remain compatible with this new processor, and not require yet another chipset.

While it seems likely that these new processors will launch alongside a Z390 chipset, we would expect the same level of compatibility while adding connectivity features built into the chipset such as USB 3.1 Gen 2 and 802.11ac wireless, as we saw on the recent H370 and B360 chipsets.

With the launch of AMD's Ryzen 2000-series of processors looming later this week, it seems like Intel is playing the waiting game before launching this 8-core processor. Speculation is that we could see this part before Computex in June.

Source: Reddit