RAM timings versus frequency on an X470 system

Subject: Memory | September 17, 2018 - 02:49 PM |
Tagged: T-Force VULCAN TUF, G.SKILL Flare X, ddr4-3200, AM4, amd, overclocking, x470

AMD processors like fast RAM, but [H]ard|OCP wanted to see if sacrificing timings for higher frequencies is the answer in all cases, or only some.  To test this out they grabbed two 16GB kits of DDR4-3200, one T-Force Vulcan TUF and one G.SKILL Flare X.  The Vulcan's base timings are 16-18-18-38 while the G.SKILL offer 14-14-14-34, both running at 1.35v.  Take a look to see how these kits performed at their base settings as well as their top overclocks in the full review.

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"We take a look at some of the new RAM available for the AMD Ryzen AM4 platform and see how well these work out when it comes to overclockability and timing tweaking. On the test bench today are the Team T-FORCE VULCAN TUF Gaming Alliance and G.SKILL Flare X Series RAM, both rated at 3200MHz."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Remember staring at MemTest86, over and over and over again?

Subject: Memory | August 27, 2018 - 06:33 PM |
Tagged: memtest86, stability

Those of us a little long in the tooth will have no troubles remembering days of Prime95 and MemTest86 runs proving that your overclock was stable as could be, but fresher enthusiasts may not have had that experience.  MemTest86 was, at one point in the early 2000's, the go to memory interface stability testing software, allowing you to boot straight into a testing mode and skipping your OS altogether.  The interface hasn't changed much, but the hardware sure has!  UEFI booting is now supported and you can test this new type of RAM that we only dreamed of back in 2002.  Check out Overclockers Club for the memories, or to learn about another tool to add to your box of tricks.

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"If you have any sort of system stability issues, starting with the memory is generally a good bet. It is often people skip testing system memory for defects or the root cause of a system crash because it is often seen as an unnecessary computer component. In reality, it is one of the most important hardware components in any computer. If your system memory is failing, it can account for random lockups, failed POST screens, and an assortment of strange computer issues."

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Memory

 

DDR4-4000 Vengeance RGB PRO, fast and fancy

Subject: Memory | July 27, 2018 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: iCUE, Vengeance RGB PRO, corsair

If you are running an Intel system that can support RAM hitting 4000MHz and have a penchant for flashing lights in various colours covering the entire top of your DIMMs then has Corsair got a set of modules for you.  These are fully iCUE compatible which allows you to sync them with other supported components.  There are interesting contrasts in this kit; while the timings are not the best, at 19-23-23-45 it does come with a lifetime warranty. 

Check out the performance and overclocking over at TechPowerUp.

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"Corsair's latest entry into RGB memory is their Vengeance PRO series, a kit supporting iCUE, which is Corsair's RGB lighting control system. This isn't just any RGB memory though, the Corsair Vengeance RGB PRO series is built for serious overclocking too!"

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Source: TechPowerUp

Is TeamGroup's T-Force VULCAN DDR4 kit TUF enough?

Subject: Memory | June 19, 2018 - 03:43 PM |
Tagged: teamgroup, ddr4-3200, T-Force VULCAN, TUF Series

This 16GB DDR4-3200 kit from TeamForce features heatspreaders designed to match the heatsinks you find on ASUS TUF series motherboards and does not feature any RGBs at all.  While it is marketed for installation in an Intel system, the Guru of 3D tested it in a Ryzen with the latest AMD AGESA firmware update and not only found it compatible but were also able to hit a stable 3600MHz, matching the performance of the Intel setup.  The DIMMs are rated for 16-18-18-38 @ 1.35V, which Guru3D managed to tighten up while testing; drop by for the full review to see how these DIMMs perform.

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"We'll peek at new T-Force VULCAN TUF DDR4 from TeamGroup, it is a dual-channel 3200 MHz kit with the ability to be tweaked a little. It's TUF, meaning the heat spreader has been aligned with ASUS TUF Sabertooth motherboards (2018 models) as well as offering full support on these boards."

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Memory

Source: Guru of 3D

Computex 2018: G.Skill Teases Trident Z RGB Royal Memory

Subject: Memory | June 6, 2018 - 08:06 PM |
Tagged: gskill, G.Skill, ddr4, Trident Z RGB, RGB LED, computex, computex 2018

G.Skill teased new DDR4 memory modules at Computex this year including the mysterious and stylish Trident Z RGB Royal memory. The new memory, of which G.Skill had a single stick on display, features a metallic heatspreader with a mirror finish as well as a crystalized RGB LED light diffuser that manages to make RGB look awesome.

Screenshot (906).png

Unfortunately, other than admiring the aesthetics, I have not been able to find any other information on this new RGB Royal series of memory. Hopefully G.Skill will be more willing to spill the beans after the craziness of Computex is over and the memory gets closer to fruition. One thing that is almost certain is that these DIMMs are not going to be cheap!

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G.Skill and Noticias3D have very short video clips of the single stick that was on display at Computex if you are curious what the crystalized RGB lighting looks like in action.

Source: G.Skill

AORUS RGB's all the things at Computex

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Memory, Shows and Expos | June 4, 2018 - 05:39 PM |
Tagged: RGB, M5, m3, h5, gigabyte, computex 2018, aorus

Gigabyte went full spectrum RGB at this years Computex, announcing an entire gamut of equipment with dancing colourful lights.  The first of these are are the four piece AORUS RGB 16GB DDR4-3200MHz memory kit, which ships with two 8GB DIMMs and a pair of dummies.

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The dummies, as you are no doubt asking yourself, are to let you populate all four DIMM slots and yet keep the price down to ~$230.   The dummies are not dim, they have the same lighting features as the DIMMs do, making the rave in your case even more impressive.

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The Aorus M5 and M3 mice also give off illumination which will satisfy dedicated RGB enthusiasts, especially when paired with the Aorus P7 RGB mousemat. 

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The M5 contains a Pixart 3398 optical sensor, capable of up to 16,000 DPI as well as removable weights which let you pick your preferred heft, at least between 18g to 130.5g.  The M3 uses a Pixart 3988 sensor, which tops out at 6400 SPI which is honestly quite sufficient for the vast majority of users.  The two mice are both able to function while slightly lifted about a surface and can produce 16.7 million hues with their RGBs.

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Now that the inside and outside of your computer as well as the mouse and its mat are glowing away in glorious technicolour, you should not leave yourself out of the show.  Strap on the Aorus H5 headset and become part of the show as you sync your ears with the patterns produced by your other peripherals.  As with the other components the H5 is not just eye candy, the 50mm beryllium magnets in the headset will deliver your ear candy as well. 

Keep an eye out for more from Gigabyte and Aorus.

 

Source: Gigabyte

Some Dell Systems Shipping with 24GB of memory: 8GB DDR4 and 16GB Optane Memory

Subject: Memory, Storage | May 29, 2018 - 04:10 PM |
Tagged: Optane, Intel, g3, dell

Recently I came across an interesting product listing on Dell’s website for its new G3 15” gaming notebook. These are budget-friendly gaming systems with mainstream discrete GeForce graphics cards in them like the GTX 1050 and GTX 1050 Ti. Starting at just $699 they offer a compelling balance of performance and value, though we haven’t yet gotten hands on one for testing.

One tidbit that seemed off to me was this:

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Several of these systems list 24GB of memory through a combination of 8GB of DDR4 and 16GB of Optane Memory for caching. A similar wording exists in the configuration page for these machines:

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Clicking on the More Info link takes you to the “Help Me Choose” portion of the page that details what system memory does, how it helps the performance of your machine, and how Optane comes into the mix. There is important wording to point out that Dell provides (emphasis mine):

Some systems allow you to add Intel® Optane™ memory, which is a system acceleration solution for the 7th Gen and 8th Gen Intel® Core™ processor platforms. This solution comes in a module format and by placing this new memory media between the processor and a slower SATA-based storage devices ( HDD, SSHD or SATA SSD), you are able to store commonly used data and programs closer to the processor, allowing the systems to access this information more quickly and improve overall system performance.

Mixing DRAM with Intel® Optane™ delivers better performance and cost. For example, 4 GB DRAM + 16GB Intel® Optane™ memory delivers better performance and cost than just 8GB DRAM.

What is the difference between Intel® Optane™ memory and DRAM? Does it replace DRAM?
The Intel® Optane™ memory module does not replace DRAM. It can be, however, added to DRAM to increase systems performance.

If I use Intel® Optane™ memory with an HDD to accelerate my games, game launches and level loads become faster and close to that of an SSD experience, but what about the game play? Is the game play impacted?
Game play will not be that different between an SSD and an HDD based systems since the games in loaded into DRAM during play.

While my initial reaction of this as a clever way to trick consumers into thinking they are getting 24GB of memory in their PC when in reality it is only 8GB holds true, there are a lot of interesting angles to take.

First, yes, I believe it is a poor decision to incorporate Optane Memory into the specification of “memory” in these PCs. Optane Memory is an accelerant for system storage, and cannot replace DRAM (as the FAQ on Dell’s website states). If you have 8GB of memory, and your application workload fills that, having 16GB of memory would be a tremendous improvement in performance. Having 16GB of Optane caching on your system will only aid in moving and swapping data from main storage INTO that 8GB pool of physical memory.

Where Dell’s statements hold true though is in instances where memory capacity is not the bottleneck of performance, and your system has a standard spinning hard drive rather than an SSD installed. Optane Memory and its caching capabilities will indeed improve performance more than doubling the main system memory in instances where memory is not the limiter.

I do hope that Dell isn’t choosing to remove SSD options or defaults from these notebooks in order to maintain that performance claim; but based on my quick check, any notebook configuration that has the “24GB of memory” claim to it does NOT offer an SSD upgrade path.

Though it isn't called out one way or the other in the Dell specifications, my expectation is that they are NOT configuring these systems to use the Optane Memory as a part of the Windows page file, which MIGHT show some interesting benefits in regards to lower system memory capacity. Instead, these are likely configured with Optane Memory as a cache for the 1TB hard drive that is also a required piece of the configuration. If I'm incorrect, this config will definitely warrant some more testing and research.

Where the argument might shift is in the idea of performance per dollar improvements to overall system responsiveness. As the cost of DDR4 memory has risen, 16GB of Optane Memory (at around $25) is well below the cost of a single 8GB SO-DIMM for these notebooks (in the $80-90 range), giving OEMs a significant pricing advantage towards their bottom line. And yes, we have proven that Optane Memory works well and accelerates application load times and even level loads in some games.

But will it allow you to run more applications or games that might need or want more than 8GB of system memory? No.

Ideally, these configurations would include both 16GB of DDR4 system memory AND the 16GB of Optane Memory to get the best possible performance. But as system vendors and Intel itself look for ways to differentiate a product stack, while keeping prices lower and margins higher, this is one of the more aggressive tactics we have seen.

I’m curious what Dell’s input on this will be, if this is a direction they plan on continuing or one that they are simply trialing. Will other OEMs follow suit? Hopefully I’ll be able to get some interesting answers this week and during Computex early next month.

For now, it is something that potential buyers of these systems should pay attention to and make sure they are properly informed as to the hardware configuration capabilities and limits.

Source: Dell

HyperX Launches Predator DDR4 RGB Modules With Infrared Sync

Subject: Memory | May 3, 2018 - 04:06 AM |
Tagged: hyperx, gaming, ddr4, ddr4-2933, RGB, RGB LED

Kingston’s enthusiast-focused HyperX brand recently launched a new set of RGB-equipped DDR4 memory modules that use IR transceivers to sync up the LEDs across all the DIMMs. The aptly named Predator DDR4 RGB memory kits feature stylized angular black aluminum heat spreaders and RGB LEDs along the top edge. The DIMMs use eight 1GB chips along a single side.

Kingston HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB.png

HyperX’s new Predator DDR4 modules are compatible with Asus Aura Sync, Gigabyte RGB Fusion, and MSI Mystic Light Sync RGB LED control software. The new kits are available in 8GB, 16GB, and 32GB capacities using one, two, or four 8GB modules. HyperX rates (PDF) the modules at DDR4 2933 MHz with CL15-17-17 timings at 1.35V when using the Intel XMP profile. Out of the box, the modules run at 2400 MHz (CL17) and 1.2 volts, however.

The RGB modules reportedly offer smooth lighting effects with low latencies thanks to the direct module-to-module IR communication keeping everything in sync.

HyperX Predator RGB DDR4.jpg

The HyperX Predator DDR4 RGB modules come with a lifetime warranty and have a MSRP of $257 for the 16 GB (2x8GB) kit and $513 for the 32 GB (4 x 8GB) kit. Fortunately, the kits are going for a bit less than MSRP online with the 16 GB RGB kit going for $245.99 and the 32GB RGB kit going for $491.99 or about $20 to $30 over the non-RGB Predator DDR4 3000 MHz offerings.

Source: HyperX

ADATA Overclocks XPG Spectrix D41 RGB Memory to 5 GHz

Subject: Memory | April 13, 2018 - 10:46 AM |
Tagged: adata, xpg, ddr4, Samsung, overclocking, 5ghz, coffee lake, Z370

ADATA recently announced that it was able to overclock its upcoming XPG Spectrix D41 RGB DDR4 memory to 5 GHz on air cooling. The new Spectrix modules were first shown off at CES 2018 along with phase change cooled Spectrix D80 DIMMs.

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Not content to let G.Skill have all the fun, ADATA took its 2132 MHz AX4U470038G19-DR41 memory and pushed it to 5 GHz in dual channel mode with fairly tight timings of 21-26-26-45-2T. They do not mention how much voltage was needed, but the XMP 2.0 profile of 4608 MHz at 19-19-19-39 and 1.45V suggests that likely at least 1.5V was needed. For comparison, G.Skill was able to hit 5007.4 MHz at CL21-26-26-46-2T while ADATA hit 4996.8 MHz at 21-26-26-45-2T (as reported by CPU-z). Both memory manufacturers used a MSI Z370I Gaming Pro Carbon AC motherboard and Intel Coffee Lake Core i7-8700K to achieve their overclocks. ADATA had the processor clocked at 4.3 GHz (100 BCLK x 43x multiplier).

ADATA’s Spectrix D41 memory uses stylized heat spreaders along with RGB LEDs along the top edges. According to ADATA it is using carefully screened Samsung B-die ICs which so far appear to be the best chips out there for DDR4 when it comes to pushing clocks and AMD compatibility. While a retail kit clocked at 5 GHz (at least when XMP is turned on) out of the box is still far off, the increasing number of successful overclocks is promising for enthusiasts that are looking for kits to overclock on their own. I am still waiting for the memory kit makers to demonstrate the 5GHz on air feat with an AMD platform though as so far the attempts have all used an Intel platform. Perhaps once Ryzen 2000 CPUs and X470 motherboards are out we will see what 5 GHz does for Infinity Fabric.

D41_Red.jpg

Tom Chan, director at ADATA Technology, was quoted in the press release as stating:

“For us, the next critical step will be working to make this more than just a technological milestone, but something that will be accessible to gamers, overclockers and others, so that they can ultimately benefit from this amazing performance.”

ADATA / XPG have not yet announced pricing for its Spectrix D41 (or D80) kits but hopefully they will be available soon. The Spectrix D41 should be available in up to 16GB per DIMM capacities and up to 4600 MHz with XMP 2.0 profiles. I am curious whether the D80 with its phase change cooler could be overclocked any more than 5 GHz or if that is simply the limits of Samsung’s current generation ICs regardless of cooling method (outside of exotic cooling like lquid helium or liquid nitrogen and needing ludicrous amounts of voltage of course heh).

Source: ADATA / XPG

Corsair Presents Dominator Platinum Special Edition DDR4 Memory Kits

Subject: Memory | April 11, 2018 - 08:07 PM |
Tagged: xmp, led, Intel, ddr4, Corsair Dominator Platinum, corsair

Corsair is introducing a new special edition DDR4 memory kit called the Dominator Platinum Special Edition CONTRAST. The new individually numbed kits feature a monochrome white a black design with white LEDs. The modules come in 32GB kits comprised of either four 8GB DIMMs or two 16GB DIMMs.

Corsair Dominator Platinum Special Edition.png

Corsair’s fancy black and pearlescent white special edition memory features 10-layer PCBs, carefully screened Samsung ICs, and DHX (dual-path heat exchange) cooling. The top of the modules hold white LEDs (no RGB here!) to add a bit of glow to your system.

Out of the box, the kits come clocked at 2133 MHz with CAS latencies of 15-15-15-36 and running at 1.2 volts. There is a XMP 2.0 profile that, when activated in the BIOS, bumps things up to 3466 MHz and 16-18-18-36 timings though the speed increase comes at the cost of more power draw at 1.35V.

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The Special Edition Contrast memory would look good in most any build, but especially one that eschews RGB for white lights and a simple color scheme. The refined Dominator Platinum memory comes at a premium price though with the 2x16 GB kit having a MSRP of $439.99 and the 4x8 GB kit hitting $479.99. The four DIMM kit is available now from Corsair and the two DIMM kit is coming soon.

Definitely on the expensive side, but it sure looks nice! What are your thoughts?

Source: Corsair

G.Skill Overclocks Dual Channel Trident Z RGB Memory to 5,000 MHz On Air Cooling

Subject: Memory | March 29, 2018 - 12:58 AM |
Tagged: Trident Z RGB, RGB, overclocking, G.Skill Trident Z, G.Skill, dual channel, ddr4, 5000 mhz

A bit over a month ago G.Skill launched a new Trident Z RGB kit that offered up 4700 MHz speeds in a 16GB kit using Samsung B-dies. Now, G.Skill has managed to push the kit to 5,000 MHz on air and the prototype kit is getting closer to fruition as a retail product.

Z370I Gaming Pro Carbon.jpg

G.Skill managed to overclock its Trident Z RGB 4700 MHz kit by a bit over 300 MHz to hit 5,007.4 MHz in an air cooled system featuring an MSI Z370I Gaming Pro Carbon AC and an Intel Core i7-8700K. The RGB memory kit achieved 5,007.4 MHz with timings of 21-26-26-46 2T (CL, tRCD, tRP, tRAS, CR) and while they did not mention voltage the kit likely required around 1.5V since the base 4700 MHz kit needs 1.45 volts. The 8700K processor was sitting at the default 100 BCLK with a 43x multiplier for a clockspeed of 4.3 GHz. Perhaps more promising is that the overclocked memory was still able to be used in dual channel mode where previous attempts required extreme cooling methods and/or operating in single channel mode.

gskill-DDR4-5000MHz.png

Tequila Huang, the Corporate Vice President of G.Skill International,  had the following to say in the press release:

“Previously, the 5GHz memory speed is only achievable in extreme overclocking and in single-channel. We’re excited to share that we’ve been able to achieve the 5GHz memory speed in not only air-cooling conditions, but also in dual-channels. This is a major milestone for us. We will make every effort to bring this specification onto the consumer market, and bring the experience of extreme performance to worldwide users.”

G.Skill is not quite ready to bring a 5,000 MHz RGB memory kit to market, but they are getting closer and hopefully by the time they do memory pricing will have settled down a bit! It is impressive how far memory speeds have come in the last few years, and I am curious where we will go from here.

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Source: G.Skill

3000MHz of RGB LEDs, ADATA's XPG Spectrix D40 DDR4

Subject: Memory | March 12, 2018 - 03:05 PM |
Tagged: adata, xpg spectrix d40, DDR4-3000, RGB

ADATA's new DDR4-3000 DIMMs have ASUS Aura Sync compatible RGBs, or with their own software you can download to power your lightshow if you aren't running an ASUS board.  The DIMMs each have 5 LEDs which you can program to display a single colour, cycle colours or set a gradient or you can opt for breathing or music modes if you prefer.  We won't bore you with unimportant details such as the default timings of 16-18-18 or that Modders Inc hit 3733 MHz at 18-20-20 timings with a voltage of 1.38 as that has nothing to do with shiny lights.

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"The XPG line of memory modules from ADATA is considered to be its enthusiast line. The XPG SPECTRIX D40 is the first DDR-4 RAM that features RGB LED. The memory starts off with a base speed of 2,666MHz and is offered in speeds up to 4000Mhz. The kit featured in this review is the DDR-4 3,000MHz version."

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Source: Modders Inc

G.Skill Launches 4700 MHz Trident Z RGB DDR4 Memory

Subject: General Tech, Memory | February 11, 2018 - 04:45 PM |
Tagged: G.Skill, Trident Z RGB, ddr4, Samsung, samsung b-die, xmp

G.Skill will soon be upgrading its Trident Z RGB line of DDR4 DIMMs with a 16 GB kit capable of running at 4700 MHz. With the claimed fastest commercial kit of RGB-equipped memory modules, the new 2 x 8 GB kit uses Samsung B-die ICs and supports XMP 2.0 memory profiles. The super-fast memory kit has been in development for quite a while and is slated for availability in Q2 2018.

GSkill Trident Z RGB.jpg

G.Skill has managed to tighten the timings on its 4700 MHz kit to CL19-19-19-39 while needing only 1.45V which is nice to see. The company has reportedly validated the new memory using a MSI Z370 Gaming Pro Carbon AC motherboard and Intel i7 8700k processor. G.Skill notes that the new kit is notable because it is the first retail kit to hit 4700 MHz as well as the first memory kit with RGB LEDs to hit that lofty memory speed. Corsair comes close at 4600 MHz with its 16 GB Vengeance LPX DDR4 kit at 15-15-15-36 which will set you back a cool $589.99 MSRP.

I am curious on the overclocking headroom on these modules actually (heh). G.Skill is reportedly using highly screened B-dies so maybe the 5,000 MHz its other kits have hit (when overclocked) would be possible. I would like to see AMD’s Infinity Fabric performance at that point when it is not being held back by memory speed especially where its upcoming APUs are concerned. On the Intel side of things, I think tighter timings are preferrable (after a certain threshold of acceptable speed of course) when pursuing the best performance so a "slower" 3600 to 4600 MHz kit at CL15 or lower might be a better buy. In any case, memory continues to be pricey, and I would uess G.Skill's new kit will hit at least $600 MSRP.

G.Skill is not yet talking pricing on these modules, but they aren’t going to be cheap. We should know more in a couple of months as we enter the second quarter.

Also read:

Source: G.Skill

SK Hynix Launches Its 8Gb GDDR6 Memory Running at 14 Gbps

Subject: Graphics Cards, Memory | January 24, 2018 - 11:04 PM |
Tagged: SK Hynix, graphics memory, gddr6, 8gb, 14Gbps

SK Hynix recently updated its product catalog and announced the availability of its eight gigabit (8 Gb) GDDR6 graphics memory. The new chips come in two SKUs and three speed grades with the H56C8H24MJR-S2C parts operating at 14 Gbps and 12 Gbps and the H56C8H24MJR-S0C operating at 12 Gbps (but at higher voltage than the -S2C SKU) and 10 Gbps. Voltages range from 1.25V for 10 Gbps and either 1.25V or 1.35V for 12 Gbps to 1.35V for 14 Gbps. Each 8 Gb GDDR6 memory chip holds 1 GB of memory and can provide up to 56 GB/s of per-chip bandwidth.

SK Hynix logo.jpg

While SK Hynix has a long way to go before competing with Samsung’s 18 Gbps GDDR6, its new chips are significantly faster than even its latest GDDR5 chips with the company working on bringing 9 Gbps and 10 Gbps GDDR5 to market. As a point of comparison, its fastest 10 Gbps GDDR5 would have a per chip bandwidth of 40 GB/s versus its 14 Gbps GDDR6 at 56 GB/s. A theoretical 8GB graphics card with eight 8 Gb chips running at 10 Gbps on a 256-bit memory bus would have maximum bandwidth of 320 GB/s. Replacing the GDDR5 with 14 Gbps GDDR6 in the same eight chip 256-bit bus configuration, the graphics card would hit 448 GB/s of bandwidth. In the Samsung story I noted that the Titan XP runs 12 8 Gb GDDR5X memory chips at 11.4 Gbps on a 384-bit bus for bandwidth of 547 GB/s. Replacing the G5X with GDDR6 would ramp up the bandwidth to 672 GB/s if running the chips at 14 Gbps.

Theoretical Memory Bandwidth
Chip Pin Speed Per Chip Bandwidth 256-bit bus 384-bit bus 1024-bit (one package) 4096-bit (4 packages)
10 Gbps 40 GB/s 320 GB/s 480 GB/s    

12 Gbps

48 GB/s 384 GB/s 576 GB/s    
14 Gbps 56 GB/s 448 GB/s 672 GB/s    
16 Gbps 64 GB/s 512 GB/s 768 GB/s    
18 Gbps 72 GB/s 576 GB/s 864 GB/s    
HBM2 2 Gbps 256 GB/s     256 GB/s 1 TB/s

GDDR6 is still a far cry from High Bandwidth Memory levels of performance, but it is much cheaper and easier to produce. With SK Hynix ramping up production and Samsung besting the fastest 16 Gbps G5X, it is likely that the G5X stop-gap will be wholly replaced with GDDR6 and things like the upgraded 10 Gbps GDDR5 from SK Hynix will pick up the low end. As more competition enters the GDDR6 space, prices should continue to come down and adoption should ramp up for the new standard with the next generation GPUs, game consoles, network devices, ect. using GDDR6 for all but the highest tier prosumer and enterprise HPC markets.

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Samsung Begins Mass Production Of 18 Gbps 16-Gigabit GDDR6 Memory

Subject: Memory | January 18, 2018 - 12:34 AM |
Tagged: Samsung, graphics memory, graphics cards, gddr6, 19nm

Samsung is now mass producing new higher density GDDR6 memory built on its 10nm-class process technology that it claims offers twice the speed and density of its previous 20nm GDDR5. Samsung's new GDDR6 memory uses 16 Gb dies (2 GB) featuring pin speeds of 18 Gbps (gigabits-per-second) and is able to hit data transfer speeds of up to 72 GB/s per chip.

Samsung GDDR6_PhotoFs.png

According to Samsnug, its new GDDR6 uses a new circuit design which allows it to run on a mere 1.35 volts. Also good news for Samsung and for memory supply (and thus pricing and availability of products) is that the company is seeing a 30% gain in manufacturing productivity cranking out its 16Gb GDDR6 versus its 20nm GDDR5. 

Running at 18 Gbps, the new GDDR6 offers up quite a bit of bandwidth and will allow for graphics cards with much higher amounts of VRAM. Per package, Samsung's 16Gb GDDR6 offers 72 GB/s which is twice the density, pin speed, and bandwidth than that of its 8Gb GDDR5 running at 8Gbps and 1.5V with data transfers of 32 GB/s. (Note that SK Hynix has announced it plans to produce 9Gbps and 10Gbps dies which max out at 40 GB/s.) GDDR5X gets closer to this mark, and in theory is able to hit up to 16 Gbps per pin and 64 GB/s per die, but so far the G5X used in real world products has been much slower (the Titan XP runs at 11.4 Gbps for example). The Titan XP runs 12 8Gb (1GB) dies at 11.4 Gbps on a 384-bit memory bus for maximum memory bandwidth of 547 GB/s. Moving to GDDR6 would enable that same graphics card to have 24 GB of memory (with the same number of dies) with up to 864 GB/s of bandwidth which is approaching High Bandwidth Memory levels of performance (though it still falls short of newer HBM2 and in practice the graphics card would likely be more conservative on the memory speeds). Still, it's an impressive jump in memory performance that widens the gap between GDDR6 and GDDR5X. I am curious how the GPU memory market will shake out in 2018 and 2019 with GDDR5, GDDR5X, GDDR6, HBM, HBM2, and HBM3 all being readily available for use in graphics cards and where each memory type will land especially on the mid-range and high-end consumer cards (HBM2/3 still holds the performance crown and is ideal for the HPC market).

Samsung is aiming its new 18Gbps 16Gb memory at high performance graphics cards, game consoles, vehicles, and networking devices. Stay tuned for more information on GDDR6 as it develops!

Also read:

Source: Samsung

Samsung Mass Producing Second Generation "Aquabolt" HBM2: Better, Faster, and Stronger

Subject: Memory | January 12, 2018 - 05:46 PM |
Tagged: supercomputing, Samsung, HPC, HBM2, graphics cards, aquabolt

Samsung recently announced that it has begun mass production of its second generation HBM2 memory which it is calling “Aquabolt”. Samsung has refined the design of its 8GB HBM2 packages allowing them to achieve an impressive 2.4 Gbps per pin data transfer rates without needing more power than its first generation 1.2V HBM2.

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Reportedly Samsung is using new TSV (through-silicon-via) design techniques and adding additional thermal bumps between dies to improve clocks and thermal control. Each 8GB HBM2 “Aquabolt” package is comprised of eight 8Gb dies each of which is vertically interconnected using 5,000 TSVs which is a huge number especially considering how small and tightly packed these dies are. Further, Samsung has added a new protective layer at the bottom of the stack to reinforce the package’s physical strength. While the press release did not go into detail, it does mention that Samsung had to overcome challenges relating to “collateral clock skewing” as a result of the sheer number of TSVs.

On the performance front, Samsung claims that Aquabolt offers up a 50% increase in per package performance versus its first generation “Flarebolt” memory which ran at 1.6Gbps per pin and 1.2V. Interestingly, Aquabolt is also faster than Samsung’s 2.0Gbps per pin HBM2 product (which needed 1.35V) without needing additional power. Samsung also compares Aquabolt to GDDR5 stating that it offers 9.6-times the bandwidth with a single package of HBM2 at 307 GB/s and a GDDR5 chip at 32 GB/s. Thanks to the 2.4 Gbps per pin speed, Aquabolt offers 307 GB/s of bandwidth per package and with four packages products such as graphics cards can take advantage of 1.2 TB/s of bandwidth.

This second generation HBM2 memory is a decent step up in performance (with HBM hitting 128GB/s and first generation HBM2 hitting 256 GB/s per package and 512 GB/s and 1 TB/s with four packages respectively), but the interesting bit is that it is faster without needing more power. The increased bandwidth and data transfer speeds will be a boon to the HPC and supercomputing market and useful for working with massive databases, simulations, neural networks and AI training, and other “big data” tasks.

Aquabolt looks particularly promising for the mobile market though with future products succeeding the current mobile Vega GPU in Kaby Lake-G processors, Ryzen Mobile APUs, and eventually discrete Vega mobile graphics cards getting a nice performance boost (it’s likely too late for AMD to go with this new HBM2 on these specific products, but future refreshes or generations may be able to take advantage of it). I’m sure it will also see usage in the SoCs uses in Intel’s and NVIDIA’s driverless car projects as well.

Source: Samsung

Studying the effect of frequency and timing for Coffee

Subject: Memory | October 18, 2017 - 04:20 PM |
Tagged: coffee lake, i7 8700k, Intel

The performance of AMD's Ryzen chips depend heavily on the frequency of the RAM installed thanks to how Infinity Fabric works.  TechPowerUp decided to see how sensitive Intel's Coffee Lake processors are, testing the performance with RAM speeds from 2133MHz up to 4000MHz as well as modifying the timings.  Not to spoil the results for you, we can reveal something else their tests revealed, G.SKILL's Trident Z DDR4-3866 16GB kit is impressively flexible, they were stable at 15 different combinations of timings and frequencies.  Check out the full results to discover the sweet spot.

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"We take a close look at memory speeds, latencies and command rate on Intel's latest Core i7-8700K with Z370. Scenarios tested include fail-safe 2133 MHz, the platform default of 2666 MHz and overclocked memory speeds from 3000 MHz to 4000 MHz - at various timings."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

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Source: TechPowerUp

Corsair Overclocks With a Vengeance, Launches DDR4 4600 MHz Memory Kit

Subject: Memory | September 21, 2017 - 11:46 AM |
Tagged: X399, ryzen, overclocking, Intel X299, ddr4-4600, ddr4, corsair

Corsair has launched a new Vengeance LPX DDR4 memory kit that is capable of hitting 4600 MHz at 1.5 volts. The new kit is a 16GB (2 x 8GB) kit that Corsair reportedly co-developed with AsRock for fine tune using their X299 OC Formula motherboard. The DDR4 kit is made using hand sorted Samsung B-dies and it supports Intel XMP 2.0 standards allowing it to clock at 4600 MHz with a single setting change in the UEFI.

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The Vengeance LPX DIMMs run with CAS timings of 19-26-26-46 and need only 1.5V to clock at 4600 MHz. This kit will be ideal for Intel’s X299 as well as AMD’s X399 platforms. While Ryzen and Threadripper platforms may need a bit more tweaking to get working, they would benefit the most from the higher clocked memory allowing the Infinity Fabric to clock higher.

Being one of the highest factory clocked DIMMs, they come at a cost. The new RAM kit (CMK16GX4M2F4600C19) is available now for $549.99 with a lifetime limited warranty.

For something a bit more tame, earlier this week Corsair launched a 2 x 8GB kit (CMK16GX4M2F4500C19) clocked at 4500 MHz with CL19-19-19-39 timings (at 1.45V) that is also available now for $479.99 MSRP. Enthusiasts might be better off buying the cheaper kit and overclocking them (though not guaranteed and might need a bit more than 1.5V) while workstation and enterprise customers with corporate expense accounts can opt for the more expensive but factory clocked 4600 MHz kit.

At time of writing the new kits were not up on Amazon yet, but they should be shortly. You can find the cheaper 4500 MHz kit on Corsair's web store but it is listed at $504.99 currently. If you wait a bit, that price should go down closer to MSRP as other retailers put up their listings.

Source: TechPowerUp

G.SKILL Announces New DDR4 for AMD Ryzen Threadripper

Subject: Memory | August 10, 2017 - 03:31 PM |
Tagged: Zen, Threadripper, ryzen, amd, G.Skill, flare x, quad channel

G.SKILL have launched several new kits specifically designed for Threadripper systems, all under the name of Flare X.   There are three 32GB kits and a single massive 128GB kit to choose from, all quad channel and all tested for compatibility with Threadripper.

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Taipei, Taiwan (10 Aug 2017) – G.SKILL International Enterprise Co., Ltd., the world’s leading manufacturer of extreme performance memory and gaming peripherals, announces all-new DDR4 specifications and expanding the Flare X series, designed for AMD processors and platforms. Compatible with the new Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors and AMD X399 chipset motherboards, these new DDR4 specifications are designed to achieve high frequency at DDR4-3600MHz 32GB (8GBx4), as well as a massive total capacity at DDR4-2933MHz 128GB (16GBx8). Included in the mix of new quad-channel DDR4 memory kits are DDR4-3200MHz CL14 32GB (8GBx4) and DDR4-3466MHz CL16 32GB (8GBx4).

Ultra-High Frequency Flare X Series Memory Kits at DDR4-3600MHz 32GB (8GBx4)
With improved overclocking performance on the latest AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors on the X399 chipset, G.SKILL is announcing the DDR4-3600MHz CL16-18-18-38 with 32GB (8GBx4) total capacity running in quad-channel mode, under the Flare X series. Tested for maximum stability, this kit’s frequency speed marks the fastest memory kit ever released thus far for an AMD platform.

Massive Kit Capacity, No Compromises: DDR4-2933MHz 128GB (16GBx8)
One of the advantages introduced by the AMD X399 platform is the increase to 8 memory slots on AMD platforms, allowing the support for massive 128GB capacity kits running in quad-channel mode. Tested using the highest standards for memory stability on AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platforms, G.SKILL announces the Flare X series DDR4-2933MHz CL14-14-14-34 128GB (16GBx8) memory kit running at 1.35V, perfect for systems requiring high-capacity, high-bandwidth memory kits.

Source: G.SKILL

AMD Will Sell Wraith Max CPU Cooler Separately

Subject: Memory | August 6, 2017 - 11:41 AM |
Tagged: wraith max, Wraith, ryzen, fm2, amd, AM4

Amidst all the big AMD announcements recently, the company quietly revealed that it would begin selling the Wraith Max CPU cooler separately at retail. The Wraith Max heatsink and fan was previously only available in OEM systems and in boxed SKUs of the highest end Ryzen processors (mainly the 1700X and 1800X). The cooler is a refreshed and upgraded version of the company’s original Wraith cooler that measures 105 x 105 x 85mm and features a boxy horizontal cooler with a copper baseplate and heatpipes with a shrouded 92mm fan along with a RGB LED ring around the fan that can be controlled via motherboard software.

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The Wraith Max is rated at 140W TDP and is connected to the system using a fan header and USB (for controlling the lighting). AMD further rates the cooler at a fairly quiet 38 dBA. The Wraith Max supports all of the usual AMD sockets including AM4, AM3, and FM2 (no Threadripper support of course heh), but there is no official support for Intel sockets.

The Wraith Max cooler will retail for $59 USD. I have been keeping an eye on the usual online retailers and have not yet seen it listed, but it should be available soon. Hopefully there will be more reviews of the cooler now that it is a retail product on its own, and maybe we can get Sebastian to take a look at it and compare it to the original Wraith cooler (and his usual lineup of course) he reviewed last year.

Source: AMD