Asus Shows Turing TUF Love with new TUF RTX 2060 Graphics Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 16, 2019 - 09:02 AM |
Tagged: turing, tuf, RTX 2060, nvidia, graphics card, factory overclocked, asus

Asus recently announced two new Turing-based graphics cards that are part of the TUF (The Ultimate Force) series. Clad in urban camo with shades of grey, the Asus TUF RTX 2060 6GB Gaming and TUF RTX 2060 OC 6GB Gaming pair Nvidia’s 12nm TU106 GPU and 6GB of GDDR6 memory with a dual fan cooler and backplate. As part of the TUF series, the new graphics cards use Asus’ Auto Extreme manufacturing technology and are put through its 144-hour validation program.

Asus TUF RTX 2060.png

The RTX 2060 GPU features 1920 CUDA cores, 120 TMUs, 48 ROPs, 240 Tensor cores, and 30 RT cores. The standard TUF RTX 2060 6GB Gaming graphics card comes clocked at 1365 MHz base and 1689 MHz boost out of the box with the boost clock jumping to 1710 MHz in OC Mode. The OC model graphics card, however, comes clocked by default at 1365 MHz base and 1710 MHz boost in Gaming Mode and 1740 MHz boost in OC Mode (when using Asus’ software).

Asus TUF RTX 2060 Backplate.png

The TUF Graphics cards feature one dual layer DVI, two HDMI 2.0b, and one DisplayPort 1.4 video outputs. The dual fan cooler is IP5X dust resistant and uses dual ball bearing fans. A black metal backplate is secured to the card to help PCB rigidity. The cards measure 20.4 x 12.5 x 4.6 centimeters so should be compatible with most cases. The cards are powered by a single 8-pin PCI-E power connector.

The TUF cards use a no-frills design sans any RGB or extra features so should be priced competitively and may go well with a silent PC or sleeper PC build. Unfortunately, Asus is not talking specific pricing or availability yet.

Source: Asus

1440p's greatest hits, featuring the Radeon VII

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 14, 2019 - 01:54 PM |
Tagged: 1440p, radeon vii, amd

When The Tech Report initially tested AMD's brand new Radeon VII they focused on 4K performance.  This lead to some feedback from those playing at 1440p, which convinced them to revisit the card and the competition, at this resolution.  The results remained similar to their previous tests, demonstrating this is a card that is good a multiple things but not the best at any.  The price to performance beats a GTX 1080 Ti if you can pick up the Radeon VII at MSRP, but overall the RTX 2080 remains a better card for gaming.

On the other hand if you are doing work which requires large pools of VRAM, the Radeon VII offers a good mix of performance for such tasks and can power your after hours gaming.

foes.jpg

"Our initial tests showed AMD's Radeon VII couldn't beat the GeForce RTX 2080 for 4K gaming superiority, but many more enthusiasts have high-refresh-rate 2560x1440 displays to deliver their pixel fix. We retested the RTX 2080 and Radeon VII at 2560x1440 to see which card comes out on top."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 19.2.2 Now Available

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 13, 2019 - 06:08 PM |
Tagged: amd, Adrenalin Edition, 19.2.2

Along with the adrenaline rush of releasing the new Radeon VII comes a new driver, available everywhere at the low price of $0.00!  The 19.2.2 versions offers you the following benefits AMD fans.

adren.PNG

Support For

  • AMD Radeon VII Far Cry
  • New Dawn Metro Exodus
  • Sid Meier’s Civilization VI: Gathering Storm
  • Crackdown 3
    • Up to 5% performance gains with AMD Radeon Software Adrenalin 2019 Edition 19.2.2 on a Radeon RX 590

Fixed Issues

  • Using the Alt+Tab shortcut out of a fullscreen application or game may be slow or take longer than expected when using a display connected by DisplayPort.
  • Apply and Discard buttons may not appear in some areas of Radeon Overlay under the Radeon WattMan overclocking tab.
  • Radeon WattMan may fail to apply memory clock changes on AMD Radeon VII.
  • AMD Radeon VII may intermittently experience a system hang when attempting to perform a timeout detection and recovery on Windows7 system configurations.
  • Radeon WattMan may display the incorrect max fan/temperature values for AMD Radeon VII.
  • Radeon WattMan may experience issues with changed values failing to save or load when multiple changes are applied at once.
  • AMD Radeon VII may experience intermittent system stability issues on some X399 motherboards.
  • Player Unknown’s Battlegrounds may intermittently experience an application crash when changing post-processing settings.
  • Radeon Settings may experience an application hang when loading the performance histogram in a game profile through game manager.
  • Update Notifications may sometimes incorrectly list the currently installed driver as an available upgrade.
  • Apex Legends may intermittently experience line corruption on AMD Radeon VII.

Grab it here.

Source: AMD

NVIDIA GeForce 418.91 WHQL Driver Enables DLSS in Battlefield V and Metro Exodus

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 13, 2019 - 12:17 PM |
Tagged: whql, rtx, raytracing, nvidia, Metro Exodus, graphics, gpu, geforce, gaming, driver, DLSS, battlefield V, 418.91

NVIDIA's GeForce 418.91 WHQL drivers have brought DLSS support to Battlefield V and both real-time ray tracing and DLSS to the upcoming Metro Exodus, which will be the first game to support the technologies from day one when it is released (now exclusively on Epic's game store) on February 15.

NV_BFV_Screen.PNG

From NVIDIA:

Battlefield V - This stunning World War II combat game, created by EA and DICE, was the first to support real-time ray-traced reflections and has now added support for DLSS — giving a performance boost of up to 40 percent with ray-tracing reflections enabled.

Metro Exodus - The third installment in the haunting Metro franchise, developed by 4A Games and Deep Silver, will support RTX-enabled real-time ray tracing — the first time it has been used in a game for global illumination. At launch, the game will also support DLSS, boosting performance up to 30 percent, as well as a host of other NVIDIA gaming technologies, including HairWorks, PhysX, Ansel and Highlights.

NVIDIA has posted a video showcasing the performance improvement with DLSS vs. real-time ray tracing in BFV, where gains of up to 40% are advertised:

As to Metro Exodus, with the additional ray traced components it would seem the upcoming game will end up being a popular benchmark for the technologies, after we have seem most of the ray tracing and DLSS discussion surround BFV to this point (Port Royal notwithstanding). At some future date Shadow of the Tomb Raider will enter the mix as well, but this is still awaiting ray tracing and DLSS support via a planned update.

For its part Metro is only gaining 30% with DLSS (vs. real-time ray tracing + TAA) according to NVIDIA, which is obviously lower than the boost to BFV. We have seen a preview of real-time ray tracing and DLSS performance in the latest Metro game over at Tom's Hardware, where they look at the performance differences and perceived quality between the two. It's also worth noting that both BFV and Metro Exodus are not fully ray traced games, as Tom's explains:

"Battlefield applies ray tracing to reflections. Metro Exodus uses it for global illumination from the sun/sky, modeling how light interacts with various surfaces. Local light sources are not ray traced, though."

The Battlefield V DLSS update is now rolling out, with some early performance numbers already available. Metro Exodus will be released on February 15, and is the latest title to eschew Steam in favor of Epic's new platform.

Source: NVIDIA

Unreal Engine 4.22 Preview 1 Published: Initial DXR Support

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 12, 2019 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, ue4, epic games, dxr, DirectX 12, microsoft

The upcoming version of Unreal Engine, 4.22, will include several new features.

The most interesting addition for our audience is probably “Early Access” support for DirectX 12 Raytracing (DXR) on DirectX 12. This includes the low-level framework to cast and evaluate rays in shaders (although they don’t clarify whether that means written shaders, nodes for graph-based shaders, or both) as well as higher-level features that use DXR, such as area lights, soft shadows, and reflections. They have also added a denoiser for shadows, reflections, and ambient occlusion, which will improve image quality with lower sample counts.

epicgames-2019-reflections-star-wars-dxr.jpg

If you remember NVIDIA’s RTX announcement, many of their first-party demos were built using Unreal Engine 4. This includes the Star Wars demo with the two Stormtroopers putting their feet in their mouths on an elevator with their boss. It makes sense that Epic would be relatively far along in RTX support, especially just before GDC.

A few other additions include Visual Studio 2019 support (although Visual Studio 2017 is still the default). The new Unreal Audio Engine is now enabled by default for new projects, which was a complete re-write of the original system that started a few years ago. The old audio system was a bit of a mess, and, worse, varied from platform to platform.

Unreal Engine 4.22 also (experimentally) opts-in to the much longer file and paths names that were introduced with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update. The previous limit was 260 characters for a full path, which was defined as MAX_PATH in Win32. I’m not sure what the new limit is, but I think it’s 32,767 characters after expansion. I could be wrong, though.

If you have the Epic Launcher installed, whether it’s for Unreal Engine, Fortnite, something from the Epic Store, Unreal Tournament 4, or whatever, then you can check out Unreal Engine 4.22 for free. (Royalties apply under certain circumstances… but, at that point, you are making money off of it.)

Source: Epic Games

February 12th Update for Battlefield V Adds DLSS

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 12, 2019 - 02:53 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, battlefield V, ea, dice, nvidia, DLSS, dxr

The Battlefield V Tides of War Chapter 2: Lightning Strikes Update #3 patch, beyond sounding like a Final Fantasy title, has quite a few major improvements. The headlining feature is improved RTX support, which we will discuss shortly, but fans of the game may appreciate the other bullet points, too.

ea-2019-bfv.jpg

But first, because we are a computer hardware site, the RTX stuff. DLSS, which was recently added to 3DMark and greatly improved the image quality, has been added to Battlefield V. This setting uses machine learning to produce a best guess at antialiasing, versus calculating it with a direct algorithm (such as with TXAA or FXAA). Now that MSAA is somewhat uncommon, because it is incompatible with certain rendering processes, we’re stuck with either antialiasing via post-process or super-sampling. Super-sampling is expensive, so it’s usually either FXAA, which tries to find edges and softens them, or TXAA, which gives neighboring frames different sub-pixel positions and blends them. Both cases have issues. TXAA is considered the “higher end” option, although it gets ugly when objects move, especially quickly and visibly smooth. Because DLSS is basically a shortcut to provide something that looks like super-sampling, it should avoid many of these issues.

DXR raytracing performance was also improved.

Okay, now the tech enthusiasts can stop reading – it’s time for the fans.

Vaultable object detection is said to have a major improvement with this release. DICE acknowledges that Battlefield V movement wasn’t as smooth as it should be. There were a lot of waist-high barriers that players can get stuck behind, which the vaulting system should propel them over. It should be much easier to move around the map after this update, which is good for people like me who like to sneak around and flank.

DICE has also discussed several netcode changes, such as adding more damage updates per packet and fixing some issues where damage should be ignored, or healing should occur but would be ignored, and so forth. Basically, all of the netcode improvements were related to health or damage in some way, which is a good area to focus on.

Also, the Rush game mode, introduced in the Battlefield Bad Company sub-franchise, will return on March 7th "for a limited time"... whatever they mean by that.

The update should be available now.

Source: EA / DICE

AMD Radeon VII UEFI Update and Pro Driver Support

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 12, 2019 - 11:17 AM |
Tagged: Vega 20, update, uefi, radeon vii, radeon, graphics, gpu, firmware, csm, bios, amd

After reports first surfaced regarding the lack of UEFI support from the new Radeon VII graphics card (with an ASRock BIOS update the first to address the issue), AMD has announced the release of a new BIOS update for AIB partners to add this UEFI GOP support to the card.

AMDRadeon.png

The statement from AMD, via TechPowerUp:

"AMD has released a BIOS for the Radeon VII with UEFI GOP included for our AIB partners. We will also make a one click installable BIOS available to end users via AMD.com. We do not expect gaming performance differences between the non UEFI BIOS and the UEFI GOP included BIOS, although the non UEFI BIOS may experience slower boot times from cold boot."

AMD specifically mentions that performance will not be impacted with the new BIOS, though boot times should improve slightly with the card no longer causing CSM to be enabled, which also broke the secure boot process. The one-click updater for owners of any Radeon VII will be available directly from AMD, and I will update our review sample when that becomes available.

In other Radeon VII news, the launch of the latest Radeon Pro driver (Radeon Pro Software for Enterprise 19.Q1 WHQL) includes some limited support for consumer Radeon cards - including Radeon VII, though not available at launch as reported by AnandTech this morning:

RPSE19Q1 One Driver.jpg

Image via AnandTech

"Under the program, certain Radeon consumer cards, including R5 300, R7, and RX series products will be able to install the Radeon Pro drivers. These products, in turn will be able to access certain professional features of the Radeon Pro drivers, but lack the all-critical certifications and optimizations that typically set the Pro drivers apart."

The lack of workstation optimizations make this less attractive for owners of Radeon VII, though it makes sense as otherwise there would be even less differentiation between the latest Radeon flagship and its workstation counterpart (Radeon Instinct MI50).

Source: TechPowerUp

Tutorial for RTX on Vulkan (VK_NVX_raytracing extension)

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 11, 2019 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, rtx, vulkan

Microsoft got quite a bit of mindshare with the announcement of DirectX Raytracing (DXR) at last year’s GDC 2018. NVIDIA’s RTX technology was somewhat synonymous with DirectX 12 for a while, although NVIDIA was not exactly hiding their equivalent extension for Vulkan. It’s not that you must use DirectX 12 – it’s that you cannot use DirectX 11.

nvidia-2019-rtx-triangle.png

Image Credit: iOrange (via GitHub)

And now there’s a tutorial on GitHub by the user Sergii Kudlai (iOrange), complete with source code licensed under MIT. iOrange is a programmer for Digital Extremes, which is best known for their 2013 hit, Warframe, although they also collaborated with Epic Games on the earlier Unreal Tournament editions (UT2004 and earlier). They also worked on Epic Pinball.

The article is very casually worded and covers up to a single triangle.

If you’re interested in a little more depth, NVIDIA is also releasing Ray Tracing Gems for free on their website, although you need to be registered with their developer portal.

Ray Tracing Gems is available here. Currently only the first two chapters are up, but the rest will arrive every few days until approximately February 25th.

I loaded sixteen gigs of HBM2 ...

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 7, 2019 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: VRAM, video card, Vega 20, Vega, radeon vii, radeon, pcie, opencl, HBM2, graphics card, gaming, compute, amd, 7nm, 16GB

While enjoying the pictures and tests Sebastian ran on the new AMD Radeon VII, was there a game that we missed that is near and dear to your heart?  Then perhaps one of these reviews below will solve that, the list even includes Linux performance for those on that side of the silicon.  For instance, over at The Tech Report you can check out Monster Hunter: World, Forza Horizon 4 and the impressive results that the new 7nm card offers in Battlefield V. 

Check those results here.

shrink.jpg

"AMD's Radeon VII is the first gaming graphics card powered by a 7 nm GPU: Vega 20. This hopped-up Vega chip comes linked up with 16 GB of HBM2 RAM good for 1 TB/s of memory bandwidth. We put this potent combination to the test to see if it can beat out Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2080."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

3DMark "Port Royal" DLSS Update Released

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 5, 2019 - 11:42 PM |
Tagged: rtx, nvidia, Futuremark, DLSS, 3dmark

If you have an RTX-based graphics card, then you can now enable Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS) on 3DMark’s Port Royal benchmark. NVIDIA has also published a video of the benchmark running at 1440p alongside Temporal Anti-Aliasing (TAA).

Two things stand out about the video: Quality and Performance.

On the quality side: holy crap it looks good. One of the major issues with TAA is that it makes everything that’s moving somewhat blurry and/or otherwise messed up. For DLSS? It’s very clear and sharp, even in motion. It is very impressive. It also seems to behave well when there are big gaps in rendered light intensity, which, in my experience, can be a problem for antialiasing.

On the performance side, DLSS was shown to be significantly faster than TAA – seemingly larger than the gap between TAA and no anti-aliasing at all. The gap is because DLSS renders at a lower resolution automatically, and this behavior is published on NVIDIA’s website. (Ctrl+F for “to reduce the game’s internal rendering resolution”.)

Update on Feb 6th @ 12:36pm EST:

Apparently there's another mode, called DLSS 2X, that renders at native resolution. It won't have the performance boost over TAA, but it should have slightly higher rendering quality. I'm guessing it will be especially noticeable in the following situation.

End of Update.

While NVIDIA claims that it shouldn’t cause a noticeable image degradation, I believe I can see an example (in the video and their official screenshots) where the reduced resolution causes artifacts. If you look at the smoothly curving surfaces on the ring under the ship (as the camera zooms in just after 59s) you might be able to see a little horizontal jagged or almost Moiré effect. While I’m not 100% sure that it’s caused by the forced dip in resolution, it doesn’t seem to appear on the TAA version. If this is an artifact with the lowered resolution, I’m curious whether NVIDIA will allow us to run at the native resolution and still perform DLSS, or if the algorithm simply doesn’t operate that way.

nvidia-2019-dlss-01.png

NVIDIA's Side-by-Side Sample with TAA

nvidia-2019-dlss-02.png

NVIDIA's Side-by-Side Sample with DLSS

nvidia-2019-dlss-03.png

DLSS with artifacts pointed out

Image Credit: NVIDIA and FutureMark. Source.

That said, the image quality of DLSS is significantly above TAA. It’s painful watching an object move smoothly on a deferred rendering setup and seeing TAA freak out just a little to where it’s noticeable… but not enough to justify going back to a forward-rendering system with MSAA.

Source: NVIDIA

Time to pull over and switch drivers, NVIDIA drops 418.81 WHQL

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 4, 2019 - 02:14 PM |
Tagged: 418.81 WHQL, geforce, nvidia, driver

NVIDIA's newest WHQL driver has been updated to better support 3DMark Port Royal as well as getting ready for the release of the RTX laptops from a wide variety of manufacturers for those who love to game on the go.

rtx.PNG

In addition to improved benchmark runs you will also get the following.

Added or updated the following SLI profiles: 

Source: NVIDIA

The RTX 2060's keep coming, this time with MSI's Gaming Z

Subject: Graphics Cards | February 1, 2019 - 05:29 PM |
Tagged: GTX 2060, msi, RTX 2060 Gaming Z, nvidia

MSI's RTX 2060 GAMING Z 6GB will cost you a bit more than the reference edition, expect to see it eventually settle at $390, however everything from the PCB to the cooler has been customized and the Boost clock is an impressive 1830MHz.  [H]ard|OCP fired up the Afterburner and pushed that Boost to 1880MHz, as well as increasing the frequency of the 6GB of VRAM from 14GHz to 15.6GHz.  If you are looking for a decent gaming experience at 1440p, this card will suit you better than a GTX 1070 Ti.

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"We’ve got a fast factory overclocked MSI GeForce RTX 2060 GAMING Z video card to review today. We’ll take it through its paces in many games, and find out how it performs, including overclocking performance with the competition. Does the RTX 2060 deliver better performance at a lower price compared to the last generation?"

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Radeon rumours, take VII

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 29, 2019 - 02:05 PM |
Tagged: rumour, amd, radeon vii

We have been seeing a lot of leaks from Twitter users APISAK and Komachi recently, with today being no exception.  Videocardz noticed some new posts which claim to show the performance of Radeon VII in Futuremark and the Final Fantasy 15 canned benchmark.

Radeon-VII-benchmarks-TUM-APISAK-768x477.jpg

The results are very interesting, to say the least, with graphics performance numbers on theFire Strike Performance preset beating an overclocked RTX 2080's 26800 points as well as it's 6430 in Ultra.  This result is very encouraging, assuming the mysterious GPU is indeed the Radeon VII we will soon be able to purchase. 

As for the FFXV benchmark, we have seen odd results in the past, though the discrepancy between the performance is well worth noting.

Radeon-VII-AIB-5.jpg

In addition to the possible benchmarks is news about the third party cards which will eventually hit the shelves.  It is unlikely we will see the ASRock model in North America, but the others should eventually appear.

Source: Videocardz

Zotac's RTX 2070 Mini will fit many cases and budgets

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 24, 2019 - 03:09 PM |
Tagged: zotac, tu-106, RTX 2070, rtx 2070 mini

Zotac made a wee splash on the market years ago with their ITX and Nano products and recently have been shrinking GPUs.  They have continued to carve out a small piece of the market, recently releasing the Zotac RTX 2070 Mini with a smaller price as well as a smaller stature.  There is more to this card than just the trim job, the GPU is a Non-A TU-106, which shares the same design but will have limited overclocking potential, if any at all.  That also seems to drop the price, which is a welcome feature.

The gang over at Bjorn3D tested it on a number of games as well as seeing if there is a way to bump the clocks up in their full review.

Feature-1-660x330.jpg

"One of the first aftermarket partner model 2070’s has rolled in. It is from our friends at Zotac, the RTX 2070 Mini. This model does not appear to be a Overclock model on the surface and might even be a non A GPU due to its less diminutive price point."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: Bjorn3D

Custom cooling creates a great card, MSI's Gaming Z RTX 2060

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 18, 2019 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: RTX 2060 Gaming Z, RTX 2060, nvidia, msi

At first glance, the MSI RTX 2060 Gaming Z is very similar to the Founders Edition, with only the boost clock of 1830MHz justifying that it's MSRP is $35 higher.  Once TechPowerUp got into testing, they found that the custom cooler helps the card maintain peak speed far more effectively than the FE.  This also let them hit an impressive manual overclock of 2055MHz boost clock and 1990MHz on the memory.  Check out the results as well as a complete tear down of the card in the review.

card1.jpg

"MSI's GeForce RTX 2060 Gaming Z is the best RTX 2060 custom-design we've reviewed so far. It comes with idle-fan-stop and a large triple-slot cooler that runs cooler than the Founders Edition. Noise levels are excellent, too, it's the quietest RTX 2060 card to date."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: TechPowerUp

Rumor: NVIDIA Working on GTX 1660 Ti without Ray Tracing

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 17, 2019 - 01:29 PM |
Tagged:

Citing word from a board partner, VideoCardz.com has published a rumor about an upcoming NVIDIA GeForce GPU based on Turing, but without ray tracing support. While such a product seems inevitable as we move further down the chain into midrange and mainstream graphics options, where ray tracing makes less sense from a performance standpoint, the name accompanying the report is harder to fathom: GTX 1660 Ti.

GTX_1660Ti_VideoCardz.jpg

Image via VideoCardz.com

"The GeForce GTX 1660 Ti is to become NVIDIA’s first Turing-based card under GTX brand. Essentially, this card lacks ray tracing features of RTX series, which should (theoretically) result in a lower price. New SKU features TU116 graphics processor and 1536 CUDA cores. This means that GTX 1660 Ti will undoubtedly be slower than RTX 2060." - VideoCardz.com

Beyond the TU116 GPU and 1536 CUDA cores, VideoCardz goes on to state that their sources also claim that this new GTX card will still make use of GDDR6 memory on the same 192-bit bus as the RTX 2060. As to the name, while it may seem odd not to adopt the same 2000-series branding for all Turing cards, the potential for confusion with RTX vs GTX branding might be the reason - if indeed cards in a 1600-series make it to market.

Source: VideoCardz

Generations of GeForce GPUs in Ubuntu

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 16, 2019 - 04:33 PM |
Tagged: linux, geforce, nvidia, ubuntu 18.04, gtx 760, gtx 960, RTX 2060, gtx 1060

If you are running an Ubuntu system with an older GPU and are curious about upgrading but unsure if it is worth it, Phoronix has a great review for you.  Whether you are gaming with OpenGL and Vulkan, or curious about the changes in OpenCL/CUDA compute performance they have you covered.  They even delve into the power efficiency numbers so you can spec out the operating costs of a large deployment, if you happen to have the budget to consider buying RTX 2060's in bulk.

cards.PNG

"In this article is a side-by-side performance comparison of the GeForce RTX 2060 up against the GTX 1060 Pascal, GTX 960 Maxwell, and GTX 760 Kepler graphics cards."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: Phoronix

GeForce Driver 417.71 Now Available, Enables G-SYNC Compatibility With FreeSync Monitors

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 15, 2019 - 03:25 AM |
Tagged: variable refresh rate, nvidia, graphics driver, gpu, geforce, g-sync compatibility, g-sync, freesync

One of NVIDIA's biggest and most surprising CES announcements was the introduction of support for "G-SYNC Compatible Monitors," allowing the company's G-SYNC-capable Pascal and Turing-based graphics cards to work with FreeSync and other non-G-SYNC variable refresh rate displays. NVIDIA is initially certifying 12 FreeSync monitors but will allow users of any VRR display to manually enable G-SYNC and determine for themselves if the quality of the experience is acceptable.

gsync-compatible-freesync.jpg

Those eager to try the feature can now do so via NVIDIA's latest driver, version 417.71, which is rolling out worldwide right now. As of the date of this article's publication, users in the United States who visit NVIDIA's driver download page are still seeing the previous driver (417.35), but direct download links are already up and running.

The current list of FreeSync monitors that are certified by NVIDIA:

Users with a certified G-SYNC compatible monitor will have G-SYNC automatically enabled via the NVIDIA Control Panel when the driver is updated and the display is connected, the same process as connecting an official G-SYNC display. Those with a variable refresh rate display that is not certified must manually open the NVIDIA Control Panel and enable G-SYNC.

NVIDIA notes, however, that enabling the feature on displays that don't meet the company's performance capabilities may lead to a range of issues, from blurring and stuttering to flickering and blanking. The good news is that the type and severity of the issues will vary by display, so users can determine for themselves if the potential problems are acceptable.

Update: Users over at the NVIDIA subreddit have created a public Google Sheet to track their reports and experiences with various FreeSync monitors. Check it out to see how others are faring with your preferred monitor.

Update 2: Our friends over at Wccftech have published a short video demonstrating how to enable G-SYNC on non-G-SYNC VRR monitors:

Source: NVIDIA

Slow light, testing ray tracing performance with Port Royal

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 14, 2019 - 02:23 PM |
Tagged: 3dmark, port royal, ray tracing

3D Mark recently released an inexpensive update to their benchmarking suite to let you test your ray tracing performance; you can grab Port Royal for a few dollars from Steam.  As there has been limited time to use the benchmark as well as a small sample of GPUs which can properly run it, it has not yet made it into most benchmarking suites.  Bjorn3D took the time to install it on a decent system and tested the performance of the Titan and the five RTX cards available on the market. 

As you can see, it is quite the punishing test, not even NVIDIA's flagship card can maintain 60fps.

3DMark-Port-Royal-screenshot-3-1024x576.jpg

"3DMark is finally updated with its newest benchmark designed specifically to test real time ray tracing performance. The benchmark we are looking at today is Port Royal, it is the first really good repeatable benchmark I have seen available that tests new real time ray tracing features."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Source: Bjorn3D

AMD Supplies First Radeon VII Benchmarks

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 12, 2019 - 08:17 AM |
Tagged: vega 64, Vega, RX VEGA 64, radeon vii, gpu, benchmarks, amd, 7nm

After announcing the Radeon VII this week at CES, AMD has quietly released its own internal benchmarks showing how the upcoming card potentially compares to the Radeon RX Vega 64, AMD's current flagship desktop GPU released in August 2017.

radeon-vii.jpg

The internal benchmarks, compiled by AMD Performance Labs earlier this month, were released as a footnote in AMD's official Radeon VII press release and first noticed by HardOCP. AMD tested 25 games and 4 media creation applications, with the Radeon VII averaging around a 29 percent improvement in games and 36 percent improvement in professional apps.

AMD's test platform for its gaming Radeon VII benchmarks was an Intel Core i7-7700K with 16GB of DDR4 memory clocked at 3000MHz running Windows 10 with AMD Driver version 18.50. CPU frequencies and exact Windows 10 version were not disclosed. AMD states that all games were run at "4K max settings" with reported frame rate results based on the average of three separate runs each.

For games, the Radeon VII benchmarks show a wide performance delta compared to RX Vega 64, from as little as 7.5 percent in Hitman 2 to as much as 68.4 percent for Fallout 76. Below is a chart created by PC Perspective from AMD's data of the frame rate results from all 25 games.

radeon-vii-benchmarks-games.jpg

In terms of media creation applications, AMD changed its testing platform to the Ryzen 7 2700X, also paired with 16GB of DDR4 at 3000MHz. Again, exact processor frequencies and other details were not disclosed. The results reveal between a 27% and 62% improvement:

radeon-vii-benchmarks-apps.jpg

It is important to reiterate that the data presented in the above charts is from AMD's own internal testing, and should therefore be viewed skeptically until third party Radeon VII benchmarks are available. However, these benchmarks do provide an interesting first look at potential Radeon VII performance compared to its predecessor.

Radeon VII is scheduled to launch February 7, 2019 with an MSRP of $699. In addition to the reference design showcased at CES, AMD has confirmed that third party Radeon VII boards will be available from the company's GPU partners.

Source: AMD