Steam Allows Remote Installation of Games

Subject: General Tech | May 6, 2012 - 03:48 PM |
Tagged: valve, steam, gaming pc, gaming, games

Valve recently released a beta update for its Steam client that allows users to remotely install games to their local machine using the steampowered.com website.

installsteambeta.jpg

After installing the beta update to the local Steam client (Steam > Settings > Beta Participation), just leave the client logged in on your machine. Then navigate to Community page of the Steam website. After that, click on the Games category where the website will then list all the games tied to your Steam account. If you have a game you want to download and install while you are away, just hit the install button to the right of the game’s name.

This is certainly an interesting feature for some, especially if you happen to be on vacation during a Steam Holiday Sale! (hehe). More details on the process can be found here. Is this a feature you’ll be using?

Source: Valve

Corsair Launches Air Series of High Airflow and High Static Pressure Fans

Subject: General Tech | May 6, 2012 - 01:09 PM |
Tagged: static pressure, high airflow, fans, corsair, air series

Corsair announced earlier this week that the company is expanding their cooling options to include PC case fans with their new Air Series. They have been bundling fans with their self-contained water cooling units since their release, but they have been rebranded fans from other manufacturers. With the Air Series, Corsair has designed the fans in-house and then had partners capable of building the units actually manufacture them. The fans in the Air Series have been designed to balance airflow and quiet operation for enthusiasts that want cooling performance with consideration towards noise.

fan_af140_up_b_1.png

Corsair AF140 Quiet Edition

Currently Corsair is offering 120mm and 140mm fans which focus on either high static pressure or high airflow. They feature a hydraulic bearing system, rubber case mounting points, and a variety of colors to choose from including red, blue, and white colored rings around the fan blades.

fan_af120_up_r.png

Corsair SP120 Quiet Edition

The fans with AF in the model name are part of the high airflow subset and are geared towards moving as much air as possible through your case. There are two 120mm and one 140mm fan for sale at the time of writing. Corsair has designed the fans with thin custom molded blades for a fan that moves lots of air and can be installed in spaces as small as 3cm in depth.

fan_sp120_up_w.png

Corsair SP120 High Performance Edition

Alternatively, Corsair is offering fans that deliver a high static pressure, which makes them ideal for pairing with watercooling radiators and air cooling heatsinks. These fans have “SP” in the model name, and are currently limited to two 120mm fans. The high static pressure is achieved by using seven wide blades and a custom molded enclosure.

The following chart from Corsair details the currently available Corsair fans.

Edition Description Size (mm) Noise (dBA) Airflow (CFM) RPM Static Pressure (mmH20)
AF120 Quiet Low noise, good airflow 120x25 21 39.88 1100 not measured  
AF120 Performance High airflow 120x25 30 63.47 1650 not measured  
AF140 Quiet Low noise, high airflow 140x25 24 67.8 1150 not measured
SP120 Quiet Low noise, High pressure 120x25 23 37.85 1450 1.29
SP120 High Performance High pressure 120x25 35 62.74 2350 3.1

 

Ruben Mookerjee, VP and General Manager of the Components Business Unit at Corsair stated that "Many PC fans on the market are general purpose designs that not always suited to the task which they're assigned. We took our expertise in PC case and cooling and designed fans that have very specific uses. Each fan is the right tool for the right job."

The new Corsair Air Series fans are on sale now and carry an MSRP of $16.99 USD for the AF120/SP120 (120mm high airflow and static pressure) fans and $18.99 USD for the 140mm AF 140 fans. More information on the Corsair fans can be found here.

Source: Corsair

Ready for Diablo III? Not with Catalyst 12.4 you're not.

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | May 6, 2012 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: radeon, diablo iii, catalyst 12.4, catalyst, amd

A recent forum entry from a Diablo III official agent informed gamers that if you were planning on playing Diablo III on the May 15th launch date, you had better not be using the Catalyst 12.4 drivers that were just released on April 25th.

d3cat12.4.png

While AMD still has about 9 days to respond to this issue, for a support rep from Blizzard to flat-out say that "12.4 isn't going to be supported for use in Diablo III" is indicative of a larger problem - can AMD's somewhat smaller driver team hope to keep up with NVIDIA's as we get set for another way of pretty major PC game releases? 

Quite a few users are taking up for AMD in the thread including Mortac that says:

I find this to be a very confusing answer. What are we to expect for the future? You say that Diablo III won't support 12.4, but what exactly do you mean by that? Are we to expect support for future drivers down the road, say a few weeks after release, or are you telling us that we'll never be able to update our drivers again for as long as we intend to play Diablo III? If the latter, then you guys really need to think that through again. People update their drivers for several reasons, and you cannot possibly expect everyone to swap drivers every time they play other games that might require the latest version.

How this issue will be resolved before May 15th will be of importance to quite a few PC gamers so let's hope both AMD and Blizzard can get their acts together.

Besides Blizzard's long awaited Diablo entry, PC gamers can look forward to Guild Wars 2, DiRT Showdown, Max Payne 3, a new Ghost Recon title, BF3: Close Quarters, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, Far Cry 3, Borderlands 2, Bioshock Infinite and many more in the coming months.  

UPDATE 2:22pm: An AMD representative has informed us that that bug referred to by the Blizzard forum support person in fact ONLY affects Radeon HD 2000, 3000 and 4000 users.  The 12.4 Catalyst software will work fine with 5000, 6000 and the new 7000 series of graphics cards apparently.  

Also, as Robert Hallock commented in our thread below:

d3cat12.4part2.png

Source: Battle.net

This is why anti-piracy is not simple and intuitive...

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | May 4, 2012 - 10:07 PM |
Tagged: piracy

The Pirate Bay has recently been blocked by a number of British ISPs but single-day traffic increased to the highest it has ever been. If there was a need for yet another example of where intuition opposes reality when it comes to content piracy, please -- let this be that so we can move on to actually solving problems.

The biggest issue with anti-piracy campaigns is that so many have opinions but so few have acknowledged facts -- even when proposing litigation.

The intuitive perception is very simple: see a quantifiable amount of what could wrongfully be considered theft and assume that sales were reduced by some factor of that value. Also, if you block access to that cesspool of theft then most of the theft will go away or move somewhere else. Both of those suggestions are fundamentally flawed statistically and have no meaning besides feeling correct.

529px-The_Pirate_Bay_logo.svg_.png

Content companies: Do not blame piracy. Sales before sails -- think before you sink.

In reality there are many situations to show that an infringed copy has counter-intuitive effects on sales. More importantly to this story is the latter situation: blocking The Pirate Bay appears to have substantially increased their single-day audience by 12 million views. This seems to be yet another conundrum where no action would have been the optimal solution.

If you were to take away a single point from this article it should be the following:

Just because something seems right or wrong does not mean it is. You should treat intuition as nothing more than a guide for your judgment. Never let instinct disrupt your ability to understand the problems you are attempting to solve or ignore completely valid possibilities at solving them.

Objectivity really is a good virtue to embrace.

"Just" Picked Up: Datacolor Spyder4PRO

Subject: General Tech, Displays | May 4, 2012 - 05:18 PM |
Tagged: colorimeter, monitor

Just Delivered is a class of articles at PC Perspective where we share what crosses into our offices, labs, houses, or nearby unguarded front porches. Today we put up with none of that. Two days ago I got off my lazy butt long enough to drive to a store to purchase a Datacolor Spyder4PRO monitor calibration device. Sure, I could have walked but -- let’s not get crazy now.

Part of doing illustration work online involves knowing how it will be viewed by the masses. Everyone will view it somewhat differently due to more-than-slight variations in their displays.

Properly calibrating your monitor to what is considered convention is difficult and not something many users do. Hardware and software exist to measure your monitor and adjust your color profiles to match. Calibrated color profiles often lose brightness and vibrancy although they are not to look good -- they are designed to look consistent.

After a couple of years of off-and-on browsing web forums for opinions on which colorimeter is the best I realized that I would be just as far ahead with a random number generator. I eventually just went with the gut and chose the Datacolor Spyder4PRO.

Colorimeter.jpg

Of course on the way home an oncoming car entered my lane to pass a bus.

It almost served me right for not leaving the whole “going outside” thing to the mail people.

Out of the box, installation was quite simple. I did have one annoyance with inputting my serial number: apparently when you input your serial number and activate online they return to you your CD key. Correct me if I am wrong, but it seems like if I were to reinstall the application I could not use the serial number that is safe and sound with the unit but rather recall the key I was given just then. That seems like a very bad method to enforce DRM -- although let’s face it, I hate DRM regardless of its form -- but thankfully I have secure notes in LastPass for situations like these.

I calibrated the three monitors very easily. My primary monitor, the Samsung SyncMaster XL2370, required two calibrations to be properly set although I believe that was my fault. Now all three monitors quite closely align to one another and seem to work well for test images in color managed applications.

My one complaint about the product itself is that it has a suction cup mount, but no suction cup. Really -- your device is almost 200$ and you cheap out on a couple-cent suction cup? Where am I even supposed to find a suction cup that will fit it? I mean, it is possible that there was an error with my package although it was sealed. Maybe it was only for the Elite package?

Really a suction cup is not necessary anyway -- they provide a counterweight on the cable to have it hang from the top of your monitor… but it is not as stable as a suction cup.

Source: PCPer

Mmm, Raspberry Pi!

Subject: General Tech | May 4, 2012 - 12:02 PM |
Tagged: Raspberry Pi, hardware, embedded systems, arm

It is not often the tech community gets excited about a minimalist piece of hardware like the Raspberry Pi; unless you follow Limor Fried it is unlikely you are even aware of the last time a new Arduino shield was released or just what you can stick in an Altoids tin.  Be that as it may, the $35 Raspberry Pi has been making news and peaking the interest of a large range of people.  The specs don't stand up if you compare them to a netbook but the footprint on the Pi is much smaller, at 85.60mm x 53.98mm x 17mm.  Both models are powered with a 700MHz ARM1176JZF-S CPU core, 256MB of RAM and a Broadcom VideoCore IV GPU with the Model A lacking ethernet and a single USB 2.0 port, the Model B has 2 USB ports and ethernet.  Tim has been covering the troubled path to retail for the Pi but has yet to get his hands on one.  TechSpot did get a hold of the Model B and put together a brief tutorial covering the basics of setting up your Pi but they can't really show you how to use it, as the entire point of the Pi is that it is a flexible platform that is probably capable of fulfilling anything you can imagine a low powered system could do.

TS_pi-2.jpg

"When the first 10,000 devices shipped in mid-April, the organization graciously sent us a sample for coverage. Along with a hands-on review of the Pi, today we'll be covering basic steps for setting up the computer and other elemental post-installation tasks to get you up and running with applications. In other words, this should serve as a starting point no matter what you want to do with your Raspberry Pi."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: TechSpot

Podcast #200!!! - GTX 690, Intel 910 Series PCI-E SSD, our Podcast Life in Review, and much more!

Subject: General Tech | May 3, 2012 - 04:53 PM |
Tagged: ssd, podcast, nvidia, intel., amd, 910, 690, 680

PC Perspective Podcast #200!!! - 05/03/2012

Join us this week as we talk about the GTX 690, Intel 910 Series PCI-E SSD, our Podcast Life in Review, and much more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malvantano

Program length: 1:23:52

Program Schedule:

  1. Introduction
  2. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  3. http://pcper.com/podcast
  4. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  5. PC Perspective Live Review - GTX 690
    1. http://pcper.com/live
    2. http://www.pcper.com/news/Editorial/Questions-GTX-690-Live-Review-Win-NVIDIA-Crowbar
  6. Podcast Life in Review
    1. #1 - 5/3/2007 - NV 8800 Ultra
    2. #10 - 8/14/2007 - AMD takes wraps off 3.2GHz Athlon 64 X2 6400+ Black Edition 
    3. #46 - 2/4/2009 - NVIDIA ION
    4. #50 - 3/26/2009 - Bigfoot new Gaming Card, Original from 2006!!
    5. #75 - 9/24/2009 - HD 5870 Launch
    6. #100 - 4/7/2010 - VRaptor 600GB
    7. #150 - 4/13/2011 - HD 6000 mid-range rumors
  7. Intel SSD 910 Series 800GB PCIe SSD First Look
  8. Dying Atoms: The Failure Of Low-Power x86 Processors
  9. SilverStone Nightjar ST50NF 500W Fanless Power Supply Review
  10. ASUS P8Z77-V Premium motherboard announced.
  11. Custom Gaming PC Being Auctioned Off For Charity Doing Multiple Sclerosis Research
  12. NVIDIA Announces dual-GPU Kepler GeForce GTX 690
  13. NVIDIA Announces GeForce Experience Cloud Service for Quality Presets
  14. NVIDIA Crates the GeForce GTX 690
  15. Cheaper GTX 670 GPU Spotted At Malaysian Retailer
  16. Moore's Law End in Sight
  17. Trinity Slides Leaked
  18. HWLB Update
  19. Hardware / Software Pick of the Week
    1. Ryan: LogmeIn Ignition - good and bad
    2. Jeremy: $60 3 LCD stand
    3. Josh:  Apparently quite CPU intensive. SRS gamers only!
    4. Allyn:  Mini SAS SFF-8087 to 4x 2.5in SATA/SAS 5.25in Hot Swap Backplane.
  20. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  21. http://pcper.com/podcast   
  22. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  23. Closing

CoolerMaster's Storm Trigger; Cherry MX Brown keys with an LED spotlight

Subject: General Tech | May 3, 2012 - 04:31 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, Storm Trigger, mechanical keyboard, cherry mx brown

Scott is PC Perspective's very own mechanical keyboard afficinado and he has covered a large portion of the current models available on the market but he has yet to get to the Cooler Master Storm Trigger.  Don't worry clicky key addicts, until he gets his own you can check out the review over at LanOC.  It uses Cherry MX Brown switches, which try to compromise between the solid bump a typist wants and the hair trigger a gamer prefers.  It also comes with 64KB of onboard memory for you to store macros and an impressive piece of software called CMStorm to allow you to program your keys exactly how you want.

LOC_storm.jpg

"Just two years ago the only mechanical keyboards you would find were from companies like DAS keyboard trying to create a nitch market. Over the past two years things have really exploded with every manufacture you can think of introducing their own mechanical keyboards. Cooler Master has been especially aggressive with multiple unique designs like their Quickfire series. What they did lack was a full featured mechanical keyboard with full backlighting, until now. Today they officially introduce their Storm Trigger, although it you look around the board was available Globally before now. With full backlighting it falls into a small category of Mechanical Keyboards with very little competition. I am excited to see how it performs."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: LanOC

May it truly be the end of our graphics card drought

Subject: General Tech | May 3, 2012 - 12:21 PM |
Tagged: NVIDA, amd, graphics card, TSMC, 28nm, kepler, southern islands, gtx690, gtx680, gtx670, gtx610

Enthusiasts were offered a bit of hope this morning with news from DigiTimes that more capacity at TSMC will be available for AMD and NVIDIA which would mean more dies being made and hopefully a larger supply of GPUs.  Since TSMC seems to have finished playing with their Cortex A9 process, there is a good possibility that the GTX680 and perhaps even the GTX690 will become common enough that the great unwashed actually have a chance to purchase one.  We can also hope that it will give NVIDIA a chance to build up stocks of the GTX670 and 610 which are due out at the end of the month and June, respectively.  Unfortunately, if a certain site is correct that may not be the case as NVIDIA will be redoing their mask and not be able to take advantage of the extra capacity TSMC could make available for them.  Perhaps if this scenario is true AMD will be able to leverage TSMC to flood the market with Southern Island GPUs and hope to win the availability war as the performance crown is firmly on NVIDIA's head in this generation of GPUs.

happydance.png

"AMD and Nvidia, impacted by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company's (TSMC's) fully-booked capacity, had rather weak shipment performance in the first quarter; however, as more capacity will be gradually released by TSMC, shortages of 28nm graphics cards are expected to improve in late May, according to sources from graphics card makers."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: DigiTimes

Questions for GTX 690 Live Review - Win an NVIDIA Crowbar!!

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Graphics Cards | May 2, 2012 - 02:37 PM |
Tagged: video, nvidia, live review, live, kepler, GTX 690, geforce

Yes, we realize it's actually a "flat bar" but that's nearly as cool to say.  Either way, wouldn't you like to win one of these?

crowbar1.jpg

Tomorrow at 1pm EDT / 10am PDT we are going to be streaming a LIVE talk between myself and Tom Petersen centered around the GeForce GTX 690 dual-Kepler graphics card at http://pcper.com/live.  We will talk about performance, power consumption, features, show demos and of course take user questions through our live chat room, twitter accounts and more. 

But we also want to get your questions TODAY to help prepare for the event.  If you have a burning question about the GTX 690 or the Kepler architecture and its features, leave us a comment below!  (No registartion required.) Both NVIDIA's Tom Petersen and I will give you our feedback.  The best question will take home an NVIDIA crowbar so you too can be prepared for the coming apocalypse!

If you want, you can also send me a message on Twitter @RyanShrout or on our PC Perspective Facebook page.  

Hurry though, we want them in tonight so we can sort and pick our favorites for the live event tomorrow.  For all the details on tomorrow's show, make sure you check our post right here!!

 

New trailer for Mechwarrior Tactics

Subject: General Tech | May 2, 2012 - 02:01 PM |
Tagged: online, Mechwarrior, gaming

PC Gamer got their hands on a new preview of Mechwarrior Tactics, the soon to be released free to play online game.  The beginning clearly shows the turn based nature of the game, especially when there is an overlay of hexes on the map, a necessity if they want to provide an experience close to the tabletop game which it has evolved from.  Once the action starts you can see Jump Jets in action as well as several LRM attacks, all nicely animated.  Fans are anxiously awaiting the release of this game, to see if it truly remains free to play as well as to see if the game is actually enjoyable.

MW_T.jpg

"Hexes with mechses makeses me happy"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

 

Source: PC Gamer

There is plenty of blame to go around when you are talking about the GTX 680

Subject: General Tech | May 2, 2012 - 01:05 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, TSMC, gtx680

The GTX680 would be far outselling the HD7870 if it was available anywhere but NVIDIA's biggest problem is that there is no supply to sell to the customers that want this card.  If SemiAccurate's sources are correct NVIDIA has yet to ship 10,000 cards in total, which really makes NVIDIA's stance that the supply problems are just a perception issue hard to swallow.  Mostly the fingers have been pointed at TSMC and the difficulties they have had with their 28nm production line, but that is getting old as well; if their 28nm process was inherently flawed they would not be at 95% capacity and AMDs GPUs would be just as rare as the new NVIDIA cards.  Could the issue lie with NVIDIA's chip design being flawed and producing incredibly low yields?  Is it that somehow the design takes an incredibly long time on the line in order to produce a wafer and so yields are not low so much as slow?  It is really hard to peg down exactly what is going on behind the scenes since neither of the companies involved are willing to discuss the causes behind the shortages.  That is the normal way of things however, no matter what company you talk about, you are far more likely to see denials and finger pointing than an explanation ... similar to children when you think about it really.

nvidia_ceo_tattoo.jpg

"Nvidia has been busily blaming TSMC for their many supposed failings on 28nm, but SemiAccurate has learned what is really going on. The short story is that the finger pointing around the Kepler launch problems should be at Nvidia, not TSMC."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: SemiAccurate

Jen-Hsun Huang's reveal of the GTX 690

Subject: General Tech | May 1, 2012 - 05:11 PM |
Tagged: jen-hsun huang, nvidia, GTX 690

Jen-Hsun Huang is always entertaining and informative to watch and that is exactly what you can do at NGOHQ.  They captured his speech at the Gaming Festival where he revealed the dual GPU GTX 690.   He also unveiled NVIDIA’s cloud-based GeForce Experience technology which is intended to take stock of your computers components and set your games options to provide the best balance of performance and quality without you having to find out on your own.

geforce-gtx-690-jen-hsun-huang-NGF-2012.jpg

"Nvidia's CEO Jen-Hsun Huang keynote from the GeForce LAN / Nvidia Gaming Festival in Shanghai, China. The event was attended by more than 6,000 gamers from across China. The GeForce GTX 690 was announced there."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: NGOHQ

Panasonic, NHK Show Off 145” 8K Plasma Television

Subject: General Tech | April 30, 2012 - 09:46 PM |
Tagged: UHD, tv, plasma, Panasonic, nhk, 8k, ultra hdtv

Over the weekend I saw a post over at Tom’s Hardware that made my jaw drop. Panasonic and Japanese TV broadcaster NHK have managed to create a 145” plasma with an 8K resolution(!). The massive television’s 7,680 x 4,320 pixel resolution conforms to the Ultra High Definition specification.

Panasonic-Intros-145-Inch-8K-Resolution-Plasma-Display-2.jpg

Other specifications of the TV include an RGB vertical stripe phosphor array, 16:9 widescreen aspect ratio, and 60Hz refresh rate. Pixel pitch is .417mm horizontal and .417mm vertical. In a video demonstration by DigInfo (seen below), the companies reported that the TV uses a new method for updating the pixels that eliminates flickering. Such flicker would be caused by the TV updating the picture at 60Hz and having to update 4,320 vertical lines of pixels! Panasonic has developed a new way of driving the pixels that scans and updates multiple lines in each frame at a time.

Panasonic will be showing off the 8K plasma at the SID International Symposium from June 3 to June 8, and Institute of Technology from May 24 to May 27. Consumers have heavily invested in 1080p televisions and now 4K is starting to be common on the content side of things. This 8K resolution is a neat proof of concept but it will likely be quite a while before content creators move to recording in 8K and consumers get their hands on it. Even so, that doesn’t stop me from drooling over this TV (and dreading how much the video card that can drive such a display at native resolution will cost)!

Western Digital retains number 2 status

Subject: General Tech | April 30, 2012 - 04:01 PM |
Tagged: western digital, sales

With the horrible flooding in Thailand that destroyed Western Digital's ability to produce hard drives many were concerned about their profits for the beginning of this year.  While they did not surpass Seagate for the number one spot, they have recovered after a poor first quarter.   As you can see in the graph their total sales dropped far more than their net profit, in part thanks to a few weeks of profits from their newly purchased Hitachi GST component.  Read all the big numbers at The Register.

elreg_wd_financials_to_q3fy2012.jpg

"Western Digital, the world's number two hard drive vendor, is bouncing back after Thai floods wiped out disk assembly lines - but not quite enough to grab Seagate's crown."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

Corsair Custom Gaming PC - Multiple Sclerosis Benefit

Subject: General Tech, Systems | April 29, 2012 - 07:25 PM |
Tagged: Multiple Sclerosis, corsair, charity

Corsair and TigerDirect have joined forces to help fund research for a cure for Multiple Sclerosis by putting a powerful gaming rig up for bid on eBay.  You have until May 5th to place a bid on the brand new Corsair C13-150 MS Custom Gaming PC and not only get a great PC but also help fight this baffling disease which attacks the myelin in the brain and nervous system of suffers; the fatty substance that insulates and protects the nerve fibres and causes short circuits which in a human mean pain and the inability to control movements.  Whether you know someone with this disease or not, it is a worthy cause to support.

  • Intel Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz
  • EVGA GTX 680 SC
  • ASUS P8Z68-V Pro
  • 16GB of Corsair Vengeance DDR3
  • Corsair Force GT SSD
  • Corsair Hydro H80 Liquid Cooler
  • Corsair AX 750W Modular PSU
  • Corsair Graphite Series 600T Mid-Tower Case
  • Windows 7 Home Premium

ms.png

It is extremely rewarding when we can put our resources to work for a good cause. That is exactly what our team has done here at TigerDirect.com, working in partnership with the National MS Society and our good friends at Corsair Memory, with support from EVGA to build this Killer Gaming PC. 100 % of the proceeds from this auction will be donated to the MS Society to continue driving the fight against Multiple Sclerosis.

C13-150-MS_chiclet01_aa_2515562.jpg

This new Corsair C13-150 MS Custom Gaming PC is built using a plethora of Corsair components and some other exceptionally cool parts. It features the latest EVGA 02G-P4-2682-KR GeForce GTX 680 SC Video Card to allow you to run the latest games at the highest resolutions! The ASUS P8Z68-V Pro motherboard and Intel Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz Processor combo will provide an outstanding gaming experience. Keeping the CPU cool is the Corsair Hydro H80 Liquid Cooler. The Corsair C13-150 MS Custom Gaming PC is complemented with 16GB of Corsair Vengeance memory, A Corsair AX 750W Modular PSU for rock solid power and a Corsair Force GT Solid State Drive for blazing fast game loads. We gave all of this awesome equipment a home inside a white Corsair Graphite Series 600T Mid-Tower Case and threw in Windows 7 Home Premium 64bit operating system. So If you are searching for a high-performance gaming system, look no further and place your bid now!

A few guys from the Tiger family and Corsair just finished riding a 150 mile bike ride to benefit the MS Society's South Florida Chapter this past weekend April 21st. And now someone will have the chance to walk away with a great gaming PC. But best of all, when you bid on this auction you are also contributing to help find a cure for MS.

 

Source: Corsair

Blender 2.63 released! Major feature: BMesh integration.

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | April 27, 2012 - 04:42 PM |
Tagged: Blender

The latest version of Blender has been released to the public officially. This version integrates, after much anticipation, BMesh and in the process reengineers how Blender handles geometry. Models are no longer constrained to triangles and quadrangles and can have any number of sides.

I do a bunch of illustration work for PC Perspective and elsewhere. Most of my work is in 2D these days although originally I worked in 3D applications almost exclusively. When occasions allows it, scarce as they are these days, I return to 3D if new projects need it or old projects get returned to.

splash_05.png

Here today, n-gon tomorrow.

I originally started with Rhino3D when I was introduced to it for a high school shop technology class. When 3D shifted to a persistent hobby I shifted to Maya and purchased an educational license. That license has become well used for game design contests and personal art projects over the past several years.

Faced with the greater than three thousand dollar price tag of a new license of Maya -- I could buy a Wacom Cintiq 24 and another used car (minus repairs) with that -- I looked at Blender once again. I am not against paying for software which gives me value over the alternatives. The GIMP just cannot replace Photoshop for my current illustration work, try as I might, and I eventually was led to purchase one of Adobe’s Creative Suites. Maybe Blender would have a different fate?

gimp.jpg

Sorry boy, cannot play today.

After a few attempts at getting used to its interface -- I mean the man-hours must be cheaper than a license of Maya, right? -- I was about ready to give it up again. The modeling flow just did not suit my style well at all. After exercising my Google-Fu I found an experimental Blender project called BMesh and loaded one of its experimental builds. After just a short period of usage it felt more natural than Maya has felt.

I felt as though I would actually choose Blender over Maya, even if given either one for free. Best part: for one, I am.

So why do I mention this in the post proclaiming the launch of Blender 2.63? Blender 2.63 fully integrates that experimental branch into the trunk core application. BMesh is, as of this release, officially unified with Blender.

For current users of Blender, Game From Scratch has put up an article which demonstrates the benefits which BMesh can provide. If you focus on modeling predominantly, your grin should grow as the article moves on. More tools should be developed for the new geometry engine too. Keep grinning.

Admittedly, again, I do not have too much time to play in 3D lately and as such your mileage may vary. Still, I can honestly say that as of what this release’s preview builds demonstrate: the water is finally warm for 3D modelers to try Blender. Is there room for improvement? Of course, but now is a great time to give it a try.

Source: Blender

ASUS P8Z77-V Premium motherboard announced.

Subject: General Tech, Motherboards | April 27, 2012 - 02:48 PM |
Tagged: Z77, msata, Ivy Bridge, asus

ASUS announces their upcoming P8Z77-V Premium flagship motherboard for Intel processors. Many features have been included such as 4-way SLi and onboard MSATA support with a 32GB MSATA SSD.

Does anyone know where I can get 4 GTX 680s?

In case you missed it, JJ from ASUS was recently at the PC Perspective offices to announce their Z77 lineup of motherboards. Lots of stuff was given away to live viewers. JJ stuck around after the live stream to record a couple of videos about overclocking Ivy Bridge and WiDi support which were released publicly earlier this week.

Now they reached out to us to announce their flagship P8Z77-V Premium Z77-based motherboard.

The upcoming ASUS flagship P8Z77-V PREMIUM.jpg

Two antennas, why-fi not?

The main features of the motherboard are as follows:

  • USB3 Boost support
  • USB Bios Flashback
  • Dual Intel Gigabit Nics featuring iNetwork Control Packet Priority
  • 4 way SLI and 4 way Crossfire support via a new PLX Gen 3 switch
  • Dual Band Wifi with BT 4.0 featuring WiFi Go! Software Suite ( for DLNA Streaming/Serving, Easy file transfer to android/iOS devices and remote desktop functionality )
  • Onboard MSATA support with 32GB MSATA SSD
  • Digi+ VRM with 3 way Digital power design ( CPU/VRM – DRAM – iGPU )
  • 9 SATA Ports
  • 6 4 Pin PWM Fan Headers featuring Fan Xpert 2 Fan Technology ( for advanced control in UEFI and OS as well as automatic fan calibration )

The feature which sticks out to me the most is the 32 GB mSATA SSD allegedly packaged with the motherboard. That would certainly be nothing to sneer at. Judging by the photos provided by Asus the flash cells appear to be produced by Toshiba.

mSATA based SSD onboard.JPG

Want to see half of a pegasus flashing?

Also visible on the MSATA drive is a chip produced by Nanya which is commonly known for producing RAM. I am, however, not Al and as such will not speculate further about the SSD -- except that my guess is the chip is probably cache. So unfortunately, I do not know which controller it will utilize.

The other feature which catches my eye is the support for 4-way SLi or Crossfire. Not much else to say about that except that knowing somewhere out there someone will be gaming with four GTX 680s and there better be more than a single 60hz 1080p monitor.

Some day.

Source: PCPer

Some Lenovo models might maybe get a little smokey ... but probably not

Subject: General Tech | April 27, 2012 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: Lenovo, fud, M70z, M90z

Some Mexican made Lenovo models were recalled earlier this year and that recall has recently been expanded, to about 63,000 units.  It seems that one single fire incident and one smoke incident with no injuries, were recorded in the US and blamed on a possible faulty part in the PSU which could overheat.  A 0.003% failure rate is apparently unacceptable in some sectors of today's marketplace, with others requiring not only a much higher incident of failure but a fatality or at least a serious injury before a recall is even considered.  While PCs releasing their magic smoke on their own is certainly a bad thing, especially on models most likely to be found in the workplace it seems the PC industry is held to an obscenely high level of performance.  The Register is not terribly impressed either.

image1.png

"Lenovo has been forced to expand the recall of possibly flamey desktops it first announced back in March.

The Chinese PC giant, in conjunction with the US Consumer Product Safety Commission, announced the initial recall affected around 50,500 ThinkCentre M70z and M90z desktops."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

Samsung Teases Exynos 4 Quad Core Mobile Processor

Subject: General Tech | April 26, 2012 - 11:47 PM |
Tagged: SoC, Samsung, quad core, galaxy s 3, Exynos 4, Android

Samsung has an event scheduled for May 3rd called Mobile Unpacked where it will be unveiling their latest Galaxy series smartphone. It seems as if the company was too excited about the new hardware to wait because they have teased small bits of information on the processor. The new chip has been named the Exynos 4 and is a quad core processor running at 1.4 GHz.

img_4quad_1.png

Based on a 32nm HKMG (High-K Metal Gate) process node, Samsung claims the SoC uses 20% less power than it’s 45nm predecessors. The quad core processor is more power efficient thanks to the lower process node and the ability of the chip to turn individual cores off when not in use. As far as performance, the company claims the new quad core part is twice as fast as the older dual core 45nm chips. The Exynos 4 also has an integrated image signal processor for high quality camera processing and support for multi format codec (MFC) decoding. The MFC engine allows the chip to process a variety of 1080p HD video files.

A few things that are noticeably absent from the Samsung product page include any specific performance numbers, architecture details, and benchmarks. Samsung is keeping a tight lid on that information until the release but once reviewers get their hands on the Galaxy III independent benchmarks are soon to follow. The comparison between the Exynos 4 and NVIDIA’s Tegra 3 should be interesting.

Source: Samsung