MWC 16: HTC Vive Launches in April for $799 USD

Subject: Displays, Shows and Expos | February 21, 2016 - 08:27 PM |
Tagged: MWC, mwc 16, valve, htc, vive, Oculus

Valve and HTC announced that the Vive consumer edition will be available in April for $799 USD, with pre-orders beginning on February 29th. Leave it to Valve to launch a product on a date that doesn't always exist. The system comes with the headset, two VR controllers, and two sensors. The unit will have “full commercial availability” when it launches in April, but that means little if it sells out instantly. There's no way to predict that.

The announcement blog post drops a subtle jab at Oculus. “Vive will be delivered as a complete kit” seems to refer to the Oculus Touch controllers being delayed (and thus not in the hands of every user). This also makes me think about the price. The HTC Vive costs $200 more than the Oculus Rift. That said, it also has the touch controllers, which could shrink that gap. It also does not come with a standard gamepad, like Oculus does, although that's just wasted money if you already have one.

htc-valve-2016-viveset.png

Unlike the Oculus, which has its own SDK, the Vive is powered by SteamVR. Most engines and middleware that support one seem to support both, so I'm not sure if this will matter. It could end up blocking content in an HD-DVD vs BluRay fashion. Hopefully Valve/HTC and Oculus/Facebook, or every software vendor on an individual basis, works through these interoperability concerns and create an open platform. Settling on a standard tends to commoditize industries, but that will eventually happen to VR at some point anyway. Hopefully, if it doesn't happen sooner, cross-compatibility at least happens then.

Acer's Predator X34; it's a 21:9 curved 1440p display with G-SYNC

Subject: Displays | February 15, 2016 - 03:46 PM |
Tagged: Predator X34, ips, gsync, curved lcd, acer, 1440p

On paper it looks brilliant, a 3440x1440 IPS curved display with a a refresh rate that can be overclocked to 100Hz, with G-SYNC handling the adaptive sync duties.  It will cost you a bit to pick up of course, currently Amazon has it priced at $1350 so it does have a lot to live up to.  Techgage tested it out and found a lot to love, from physical control buttons instead of virtual controls, HDMI and DisplayPort connectors as well as four USB 3.0 ports speak well of the physical design. On the other hand the monitor has a serious case of IPS glow and some may not be able to hit 100Hz, then again neither can most GPUs even when in SLI.  Techgage offers advice on adjusting your display if you have issues and overall loved everything about the display ... excepting the price.

Ryan and the crew took a look at this display a while back.

Acer-X34-Predator-G-SYNC-Ultra-wide-Monitor-Overview-2.jpg

"On the lookout for a gaming monitor that can do it all? If price isn’t a concern, Acer's Predator X34 is the one to look at. It comes in at 34 inches, boasts a 3440×1440 ultra-wide resolution, makes images pop with an IPS panel, takes advantage of NVIDIA’s G-SYNC frame-smoothing technology, and if that’s not enough: it’s curved."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: Techgage

Monoprice Graphics Tablets Are Available

Subject: Displays | February 6, 2016 - 10:41 PM |
Tagged: monoprice, pen display, touch screen, drawing

A couple of CESes ago, Monoprice launched a couple of 22-inch pen displays to compete with the Wacom Cintiq 22HD. Shortly afterward, the products disappeared from their website and line-up, so I assumed, at the time, that they changed their mind or otherwise refocused.

monoprice-2016-pen-display-22.jpg

Turns out, it was only temporary. There are now two models on their product list, one for $499.99 and another for $599.99, although I have a feeling that the cheaper model might be discontinued. The only real, concrete difference that I can see is the $599.99 model uses “battery-free” pens, which I'm assuming is powered by induction from the display surface. The cheaper model is out-of-stock with an estimated availability of “TBD”. That one uses rechargeable pens. The $599.99 model also lists Linux drivers. The $599.99 version also has a slower response time (12ms vs 5ms) and higher viewing angles, although both are listed as IPS.

Whether or not the $499.99 model will become available again, the $599.99 one is still about a third of the price of the Wacom Cintiq 22HD. Also, unlike the Wacom, it supports Linux as mentioned above. They used to offer a pen display with a ten-finger capacitive touchscreen, which competes with the Wacom Cintiq 22HD Touch, but that has not been relaunched, at least not yet.

Source: Monoprice

A big beautiful curvy MVA display with some omissions, the BenQ XR3501

Subject: Displays | January 19, 2016 - 04:44 PM |
Tagged: XR3501, mva, benq, 2560x1080, 144hz

Benq made some interesting design choices on the XR3501 which some will love and some will absolutely despise.  A 35" MVA panel at 144Hz is impressive to behold and one with "2000R Ultra Curve Technology"  is even more so as it is a significantly higher curve than most other monitors.  The 2000R is actually an industry standard and denotes the radius, in millimetres, of the circle this monitor would describe which in this case is 2 metres.  Most other curved monitors are 4000-4500R, as in 4 to 4.5 metres radius. 

On the other hand, the monitor does not have adaptive sync technology and the resolution of 2560x1080 will cause some disappointment, as may the ~$1000 price tag.  You can either check out Hardware Canucks' full review here or just scroll on in disgust.

front_game.jpg

"Massive curved gaming monitors seem to be the flavor of the day and BenQ's XR3501 may be one of the most insane. It boasts a 35" curved MVA panel with a 144Hz refresh rate."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

CES 2016: Dell UltraSharp U3017Q 4K OLED Pro Display

Subject: Displays, Shows and Expos | January 9, 2016 - 02:59 AM |
Tagged: CES, CES 2016, dell, ultrasharp, oled

For the longest time, display technology was stagnant. Professional monitors were 1440p, IPS panels (or 2560x1600 for 16:10 models) and high-90% Adobe RGB color, which is useful for both video and print gamuts. Consumer monitors were based on TN technology that could maybe cover the smaller sRGB color space, which covers video. Mobile devices, due to their small size, relatively high viewing angle requirements, and eventually high PPI, started introducing higher-end technologies to consumers. G-Sync, and later FreeSync, continued to differentiate high-end panels. Still, apart from the shift to 4K 60Hz, professional panels didn't go through an astonishing upgrade.

dell-2016-ultrasharp-oled-engadget.jpg

Image Credit: Engadget

OLED was always on the horizon though, and are now being integrated into consumer, and professional, monitors. The Dell UltraSharp U3017Q is one such display, with a 30-inch size and 4K resolution. It completely covers Adobe RGB and 97.8% of DCI-P3. DCI-P3 is not a superset of Adobe RGB, it's just a bit more shifted into the reds, and it is designed for digital cinema projects. Because it's not blocking white light, it can get deeper blacks and more saturated colors.

For accessories, it has a USB Type-C connector that can provide 100W of power, as well as high-speed data and apparently video.

Its pricing and availability is where we get to its downside. It will ship March 31st, which is great news for the new technology, but it will cost $4,999, which is not so amazing. That said, if companies get their hands on it, it might eventually trickle into the prosumer and consumer space, like the 4K IGZO panels did a couple of years ago.

What do our readers think?

Did it launch too early? Or does this make you interested when the price drops? Or, alternatively, are you planning on dropping a huge chunk of cash as soon as they'll take it?

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Engadget

CES 2016: AMD Shows Polaris Architecture and HDMI FreeSync Displays

Subject: Graphics Cards, Displays | January 8, 2016 - 02:56 PM |
Tagged: video, Polaris, hdmi, freesync, CES 2016, CES, amd

At its suite at CES this year, AMD was showing off a couple of new technologies. First, we got to see the upcoming Polaris GPU architecture in action running Star Wars Battlefront with some power meters hooked up. This is a similar demo to what I saw in Sonoma back in December, and it compares an upcoming Polaris GPU against the NVIDIA GTX 950. The result: total system power of just 86 watts on the AMD GPU and over 150 watts on the NVIDIA GPU.

Another new development from AMD on the FreeSync side of things was HDMI integration. The company took time at CES to showcase a pair of new HDMI-enabled monitors working with FreeSync variable refresh rate technology. 

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: AMD

CES 2016: Monoprice Announces 21:9 and 4K Displays

Subject: Displays | January 7, 2016 - 02:37 AM |
Tagged: ultra wide, monoprice, monitor, ips, display, CES 2016, CES, 4k, 21:9

Monoprice announced a pair on monitors today at CES, beginning with their new ultra-wide 21:9 display.

DSC_0268.jpg

The monitor features a 3440 x 1440 IPS panel with a 75 Hz refresh rate, but the big story with this monitor is going to be cost, as Monoprice will be selling this for $499 – the lowest we’ve seen for a 3440 x 1440 by far. (LG is currently the only supplier of these curved 34-inch 3440x1440 IPS panels, so this should be the same panel found in similar monitors on the market.)

Monoprice also announced a new 27-inch 4K display at CES, and this USB-C monitor uses an LG IPS panel with 99% Adobe RGB color support. Also $499, the monitor offers 100 watt USB-C power delivery for device charging for laptops and other devices, as well as USB 3.0 connectivity. (The display was not available to photograph.)

It was a point of emphasis that Monoprice is only using A+ panels for these new monitors (which means they are the same grade as the big name brands), and the company really seems to be working to establish itself in the display space. Both of these monitors will be available in Q1 2016.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Monoprice

CES 2016: Oculus Price Announced and Pre-Orders Open

Subject: Displays, Shows and Expos | January 6, 2016 - 05:04 PM |
Tagged: Oculus, oculus rift, oculus touch, CES, CES 2016

Oculus has finally announced that the Rift will launch on March 28th for $599 USD. If you were an original backer on Kickstarter, then this kit will be given to you for free. DK2 purchasers do not receive this gift, but I guess the company was relatively established by that point. Pre-orders have now opened, although the kit will be available (albeit at “limited locations”) through typical retail channels in April. Finally, making good on their “$1500” announcement earlier this year, systems that meet the minimum requirements, and bundle the Oculus Rift, will be available for pre-order that start at $1499.

oculus-2016-riftkit.jpg

Okay, so let's unpack this.

The elephant in the room is the price. It's steep. If you are even moderately patient, you can pick up a GeForce 980 Ti for the same amount. (As I write this, I'm looking at a Gigabyte 980 Ti with a custom cooler for $599.99 on Amazon.) For that price, you get the headset (with its two 1080x1200 OLED screens, microphone, and headphones), an Xbox One controller, a sensor, and a newly-announced Oculus Remote. You cannot purchase the Oculus Rift without an Xbox One controller, which is unfortunate for current owners of Xbox One controllers.

Who has two thumbs and bought an Xbox One Elite controller? This guy.

The benefit of including a (regular) Xbox One controller is that Oculus Rift developers can rely on each customer having access to a solid PC gamepad. Without it, some percentage of users might (and when you deal with large sample spaces, probability increasingly becomes a distribution) have just a mouse and keyboard. I'd also expect that Microsoft would provide them a bit of a discount for at least the volume, with the ties between Microsoft and Facebook possibly coming into play, too.

Unlike the HTC Vive, the Oculus Rift will not ship with its motion controller (called the “Oculus Touch”). That will be delayed until later in the year, which also means that some fraction of the user base will never have it. This is a concern for cross-compatibility between the Rift and the Vive, but not nearly as bad as it would have been if Oculus didn't have any motion control option at all. Developers would be looking at a “release on both Wii and PS2” situation, only with a (likely) much smaller install base.

And a final point: What about the other uses of Oculus?

oculus-2016-remote.jpg

The Oculus Remote controls the interface and media.

This announcement is gaming-centric, to say the very least. Oculus has said that the Rift is “primarily a gaming device” and, apparently, Palmer Luckey, founder of Oculus, strongly believes in gaming for the device. In my opinion though, it could be very useful, especially in professional applications. If the OLED screens have sufficient color and resolution, then desktop space becomes infinite. You don't need an additional monitor to map additional virtual space to your environment. While that's probably not something that Facebook could do alone, they could encourage the parties who influence these decisions with tech demos, peripherals, and so forth.

They still don't seem to be. This could be a concern since their primary competitors, Microsoft and even Valve/HTC, already have non-zero amounts of progress in that space. I'd be curious to hear whether they have any plans at all moving forward, even if those plans are to be reactionary.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Oculus

CES 2016: ASUS Announces MB169C+ USB Type-C Monitor

Subject: Displays, Shows and Expos | January 5, 2016 - 08:53 PM |
Tagged: usb monitor, usb 3.0, mb169c+, CES 2016, CES, asus

I somehow missed the ASUS MB168B+ USB 3.0 monitor. It is a 15.6-inch, 1080p, TN display that connects to the PC by a single USB 3.0 cord. This provides both power and video, so you can have multiple monitors on the go without struggling to find a wall outlet. At the very least, you can reduce it to just the one charging your laptop.

asus-2016-MB169C+.png

This was upgraded at CES to the MB169C+. It has a few differences. First, it uses an IPS display instead of the MB168B+'s TN panel. This should provide better color and viewing angles. It also switches from a USB 3.0 Type-A connector to a USB 3.0 Type-C one, which is starting to arrive in smaller laptops and tablets (which have to be running Windows for this device). The display is 8.5mm thick and weighs 1.76 lbs.

Pricing and availability vary by region.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: ASUS

CES 2016: ASUS Announces MG Line of 4K Monitors

Subject: Displays, Shows and Expos | January 5, 2016 - 08:20 PM |
Tagged: asus, CES, CES 2016, mg28uq, mg24uq, vrr, freesync, adaptive sync

Two 4K monitors were announced by ASUS at the show. Both use VESA Adaptive-Sync for variable refresh rate (VRR) gaming, which means they are compatible with AMD FreeSync, but not NVIDIA G-Sync. If you want to use the latter VRR standard, then you would be more interested in the ROG Swift PG348Q monitor that was announced in September. There was talk that Intel would be implementing a VRR format VESA Adaptive-Sync in a future GPU.

asus-2016-mg24uq.jpg

ASUS MG24UQ

If you're still here, then you either don't care about variable refresh, or you are looking for an AMD-compatible one. The first one is the 24-inch MG24UQ. It is based on an IPS panel, which are used for vibrant, precise colors and wide viewing angles. They tend to be a little slower than traditional “gaming” panels, but that is so low for the last couple of years that IPS is considered a pure upgrade. The second monitor, the 28-inch MG28UQ, is not IPS, though.

asus-2016-mg28uq.jpg

ASUS MG28UQ

Again, no pricing or availability yet as it varies by region.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: ASUS

BENQ previews the new monitors they will show off at CES

Subject: Displays, Shows and Expos | December 17, 2015 - 02:32 PM |
Tagged: benq, VZ2470H, freesync, XR3501, XL2730Z, 144hz, CES 2016

BENQ sent out a teaser of three of the displays they will be demonstrating at CES 2016, the VZ2470H with a slim bezel and impressive contrast ratio, the huge, curved XR3501 and the XL2730Z with VESA Standard Adaptive-Sync, the technology once known as FreeSync.

VZ2470H.jpg

The VZ2470H is a VA panel, with an impressive 3000:1 native contrast ratio, 4ms GTG response time and what BenQ refers to as ZeroFlicker which they claim will reduce eyestrain from LED backlight flickering.  The picture shows this 23.8" 1920 x 1080 display will have a very thin bezel, we can hope that it is not an exaggeration as it would make this a good choice for multiple monitor setups in an office or even for a lower cost gaming system.

XR3501.jpg

The BenQ XR3501 will be of far more interest to gamers, this 35" 2560 x 1080 monitor is curved to give you a great view.  It also runs at a 144Hz refresh rate with a 4ms GTG response time.  BenQ does not specifiy the panel type but it is likely to be VA as well.

gallery-2.jpg

Last but not least is the BenQ XL2730Z, a 27" 2560x1440 display that is fully VESA Standard Adaptive-Sync compliant, with a top refresh rate of 144Hz.   It also has a 1ms GTG and is advertised as having no input lag, as you might expect this also means it is a TN panel, but remember, this is not the TN of a few years ago. 

gallery-3.jpg

The monitor also has some other interesting tricks up its bezel, Display Mode and Smart Scaling allow you to virtually scale the monitor in a variety of sizes, 17", 19", 19"W, 21.5", 22"W, 23"W, 23.6"W and 24"W are defaults but you can create your own as well.  The Auto Game Mode feature lets you save monitor settings specific to a game profile and even to export them to a USB drive to take with you if you so desire.  All of those functions and more are controlled by the small device you can see on the stand above.

2016 is shaping up to be a very interesting year for displays.

They will also being showing off three different projectors, the HT4050, HT3050 and the budget-friendly HT2050, a portable electrostatic Bluetooth speaker called the treVolo and even even a fancy desk lamp.

Source: BENQ

LG Invests $1.6 Billion in $8.7 Billion OLED Factory

Subject: Displays | November 28, 2015 - 05:27 PM |
Tagged: LG, lg display, oled

LG Display announced that they are investing $1.6 Billion USD to build an OLED panel factory in Paju, South Korea. This initial cost will cover the building, the “foundations” of the clean rooms, and basic infrastructure such as water and power. Construction will begin immediately. The plant is expected to cost $8.7 Billion USD by the time it starts producing displays, which the company anticipates for early 2018. It will produce panels for smart watches, cars, and even large TVs.

lg_display_logo.jpg

The shift from LCD to OLED has been anticipated for a while, but it seems like the former technology just kept remaining viable. It kept ahead of plasma technology, despite LCD being considered inferior in terms of contrast and maintainability by some, and outlived it. SED threatened to crush it, but never really became available because Canon basically misunderstood patent licensing terms from a Texas-based nanotech company. Mobile devices helped push LED panels away from TN technology and into IPS-like panels, which closed the gap between LCD and early OLED.

LCD would eventually need to reach its maximum viable potential though, and heightened availability of OLED could do it. Hopefully the technology makes it to consumer desktop panels relatively soon. Display manufacturers have been experimenting with higher refresh rates, better displays, and higher resolution recently, but adding OLED to the mix should push the industry toward focusing on contrast and color reproduction even more heavily.

Source: LG Display

Mobile VR at high Noon

Subject: Displays | November 26, 2015 - 01:08 PM |
Tagged: noon, virtual reality

Similar in looks to Oculus Gear VR the Noon VR headset is compatible with more than just Samsung phones, any iOS or Android device between 4.7 inches to 5.7 should be supported.  At 230g naked, plus the weight of your phone the Noon felt a bit heavy to Hardware Canucks, a lot of that weight is balanced on your nose.  The 95 degree viewing angle is impressive and there is a focus dial on the headset for fine tuning but the latency and resolution are up to your phone, not the Noon.  As of yet there is little content for the Noon VR headset but the price is decent, currently it retails for $90 which makes it an interesting option for those who want to experiment with a VR device.

1.jpg

"With the big divide in computing power between desktops and smartphones, are we ready for mobile VR? The Noon VR headset is an attempt to answer that question."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

AOC Introduces 24-inch 4K PLS Monitor with HDMI 2.0

Subject: Displays | November 18, 2015 - 10:04 AM |
Tagged: U2477PWQ, PLS, monitor, HDMI 2.0, AOC, 4k monitor, 24-inch display

AOC has announced a new, compact 4K display with a PLS panel, and the U2477PWQ also features HDMI 2.0 input.

U2477PWQ_front.jpg

With a PLS panel providing a full 178/178 viewing angle the U2477PWQ looks like an attractive alternative to TN designs, if similarly priced. The 16.7 million colors specified indicate the use of an 8-bit panel/processing, so this won't offer the same level of color gradation as a 10-bit IPS (or PLS) panel, though likely not an issue unless this is intended for serious color work. As far as the ergonomics are concerned, the display stand offers full hight/pivot/tilt functionality, and there is also a standard 100 mm VESA mount on the back.

Specifications from AOC:

  • Monitor Size: 23.6 Inch
  • Resolution: 3840x2160@60Hz
  • Response time: 4 ms
  • Panel Type: PLS
  • Viewing Angle: 178/178
  • Colors: 16.7 Million
  • Brightness: 300 cd/m2 (type)
  • Contrast Ratio: 1000:1
  • Dynamic Contrast Ratio: 50M:1
  • HDCP: Compatible    
  • Input: DVI, HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort, D-Sub    
  • Ergonomics: Pivot, Swivel, Tilt -5/+23; Height Adjustment 130mm
  • Other Features:    FlickerFree, Vesa Wallmount 100x100, i-Menu, e-Saver, Screen+
  • Power Source: 100 - 240V 50/60Hz
  • Power Consumption: On 34W; Standby 0.5W; Off: 0.3W

U2477PWQ_back.jpg

This new display is listed on AOC's European site here, and it appears that the U2477PWQ is not yet available in the United States.

Source: FlatpanelsHD

Acer Announces New Predator XB1 Series G-Sync Gaming Monitors

Subject: Displays | November 3, 2015 - 12:22 PM |
Tagged: XB271HU, XB271HK, variable refresh rate, Predator XB1, monitor, ips, gaming monitor, g-sync, acer, 27-inch, 100% sRGB

Acer has expanded their Predator gaming monitor lineup with two new 27-inch displays featuring NVIDIA G-Sync technology.

Predator XB271HU_wp_03.jpg

The Acer Predator XB271HU

First up is the XB271HU:

"The new Predator XB271HU touts a zero-frame edge-to-edge design with a WQHD (2560 x 1440) IPS panel that supports 100% of the sRGB color gamut as well as NVIDIA® ULMB™ technology(1) to reduce motion blur by delivering sharp edges in fast-paced gaming environments. It has a fast 4ms gray to gray response time, 350 cd/m2 brightness and up to a supercharged 165Hz overclocking refresh rate that speeds up the frames per second for delivering ultra-smooth gameplay."

And if WQHD resolution just isn't enough, there is also a 4K/UHD option, model XB271HK:

"The 27-inch Acer Predator XB271HK touts spectacular picture quality with a 4K UHD (3840x2160@60Hz) panel boasting 300 cd/m2 brightness and 1.07 billion colors. This stunning monitor also provides a high 100 percent sRGB color accuracy and reproduction.

Rendering fast-moving actions and dramatic transitions without smearing or ghosting, the Acer Predator XB271HK’s IPS display offers a quick 4ms response. It also provides wide viewing angles with accurate colors up to 178 degrees horizontally and vertically."

Predator XB271HK_12.jpg

The monitors feature Acer’s GameView technology, “which allows gamers to swiftly toggle between three customizable display profiles to tweak settings in-game without the need to navigate through an OSD menu”, dark boost black level adjustment, and Acer’s Eye Protect Technology “with flicker-less, blue-light filter, ComfyView and low-dimming technologies to help safeguard the eyes from blue light emissions and decrease eye fatigue during long gaming sessions”.

The stands on the new Predator XB1 monitors feature tilt, pivot, and height adjustment, and the monitors are VESA compliant. Connectivity consists of HDMI, DisplayPort v1.2 and a 4-port USB 3.0 hub, with sound provided by 2W stereo speakers.

Predator XB271HK_wp_01.jpg

The Acer Predator XB271HK

The Predator XB1 Series monitors will be available this month, and the MSRP’s are $799 for the Predator XB271HU, and $899 for the Predator XB271HK.

Source: Acer

ASUS ROG is Swiftly filling the monitor market; meet the PG27AQ

Subject: Displays | November 2, 2015 - 05:23 PM |
Tagged: asus, ASUS ROG, ROG Swift, swift PG27AQ, ips display, 4k, 60hz

The 165Hz G-SYNC compatible ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q was recently on the PCPer review bench, garnering a Gold Award for its performance.  Kitguru recently wrapped up a review of a slightly different model, the ROG Swift PG27AQ.  Like the other model it is a 27" IPS display which supports G-SYNC, however only to 60Hz as it is a 4K (3840×2160) monitor.  The bandwidth required to provide adaptive refresh at higher than 60Hz on a 4K display just isn't really available yet, so you have to make a choice between a high resolution or a high maximum refresh rate.  Next year we will see monitors capable of this as the DisplayPort interface is updated.  For now take a look at the review to see which you prefer between resolution and refresh rate.

ROG_Swift_PG27AQ650px.jpg

"The ROG Swift PG27AQ is a 4K gaming monitor from Asus that supports Nvidia G-Sync up to 60Hz. It’s a 27-inch IPS display with a 4ms response time and a 10-bit colour panel. Add on a flexible stand with pivot, tilt and rotate support, with a redesigned software interface, and it could be a contender for the best gaming display on the market."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

 

Source: Kitguru

Testing GPU Power Draw at Increased Refresh Rates using the ASUS PG279Q

Subject: Graphics Cards, Displays | October 24, 2015 - 04:16 PM |
Tagged: ROG Swift, refresh rate, pg279q, nvidia, GTX 980 Ti, geforce, asus, 165hz, 144hz

In the comments to our recent review of the ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q G-Sync monitor, a commenter by the name of Cyclops pointed me in the direction of an interesting quirk that I hadn’t considered before. According to reports, the higher refresh rates of some panels, including the 165Hz option available on this new monitor, can cause power draw to increase by as much as 100 watts on the system itself. While I did say in the review that the larger power brick ASUS provided with it (compared to last year’s PG278Q model) pointed toward higher power requirements for the display itself, I never thought to measure the system.

To setup a quick test I brought the ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q back to its rightful home in front of our graphics test bed, connected an EVGA GeForce GTX 980 Ti (with GPU driver 358.50) and chained both the PC and the monitor up to separate power monitoring devices. While sitting at a Windows 8.1 desktop I cycled the monitor through different refresh rate options and then recorded the power draw from both meters after 60-90 seconds of time to idle out.

powerdraw.png

The results are much more interesting than I expected! At 60Hz refresh rate, the monitor was drawing just 22.1 watts while the entire testing system was idling at 73.7 watts. (Note: the display was set to its post-calibration brightness of just 31.) Moving up to 100Hz and 120Hz saw very minor increases in power consumption from both the system and monitor.

But the jump to 144Hz is much more dramatic – idle system power jumps from 76 watts to almost 134 watts – an increase of 57 watts! Monitor power only increased by 1 watt at that transition though. At 165Hz we see another small increase, bringing the system power up to 137.8 watts.

Interestingly we did find that the system would repeatedly jump to as much as 200+ watts of idle power draw for 30 seconds at time and then drop back down to the 135-140 watt area for a few minutes. It was repeatable and very measurable.

So, what the hell is going on? A look at GPU-Z clock speeds reveals the source of the power consumption increase.

powerdraw2.png

When running the monitor at 60Hz, 100Hz and even 120Hz, the GPU clock speed sits comfortably at 135MHz. When we increase from 120Hz to 144Hz though, the GPU clock spikes to 885MHz and stays there, even at the Windows desktop. According to GPU-Z the GPU is running at approximately 30% of the maximum TDP.

Though details are sparse, it seems pretty obvious what is going on here. The pixel clock and the GPU clock are connected through the same domain and are not asynchronous. The GPU needs to maintain a certain pixel clock in order to support the required bandwidth of a particular refresh rate, and based on our testing, the idle clock speed of 135MHz doesn’t give the pixel clock enough throughput to power anything more than a 120Hz refresh rate.

refreshsetup.jpg

Pushing refresh rates of 144Hz and higher causes a surprsing increase in power draw

The obvious question here though is why NVIDIA would need to go all the way up to 885MHz in order to support the jump from 120Hz to 144Hz refresh rates. It seems quite extreme and the increased power draw is significant, causing the fans on the EVGA GTX 980 Ti to spin up even while sitting idle at the Windows desktop. NVIDIA is aware of the complication, though it appears that a fix won’t really be in order until an architectural shift is made down the road. With the ability to redesign the clock domains available to them, NVIDIA could design the pixel and GPU clock to be completely asynchronous, increasing one without affecting the other. It’s not a simple process though, especially in a processor this complex. We have seen Intel and AMD correctly and effectively separate clocks in recent years on newer CPU designs.

What happens to a modern AMD GPU like the R9 Fury with a similar test? To find out we connected our same GPU test bed to the ASUS MG279Q, a FreeSync enabled monitor capable of 144 Hz refresh rates, and swapped the GTX 980 Ti for an ASUS R9 Fury STRIX.

powerdrawamd1.png

powerdrawamd2.png

The AMD Fury does not demonstrate the same phenomenon that the GTX 980 Ti does when running at high refresh rates. The Fiji GPU runs at the same static 300MHz clock rate at 60Hz, 120Hz and 144Hz and the power draw on the system only inches up by 2 watts or so. I wasn't able to test 165Hz refresh rates on the AMD setup so it is possible that at that threshold the AMD graphics card would behave differently. It's also true that the NVIDIA Maxwell GPU is running at less than half the clock rate of AMD Fiji in this idle state, and that may account for difference in pixel clocks we are seeing. Still, the NVIDIA platform draws slightly more power at idle than the AMD platform, so advantage AMD here.

For today, know that if you choose to use a 144Hz or even a 165Hz refresh rate on your NVIDIA GeForce GPU you are going to be drawing a bit more power and will be less efficient than expected even just sitting in Windows. I would bet that most gamers willing to buy high end display hardware capable of those speeds won’t be overly concerned with 50-60 watts of additional power draw, but it’s an interesting data point for us to track going forward and to compare AMD and NVIDIA hardware in the future.

Acer Predator X34: First 34-Inch Curved IPS Gaming Monitor with G-SYNC

Subject: Displays | October 13, 2015 - 12:24 PM |
Tagged: acer, Predator X34, gaming monitor, 34-inch, ips, g-sync, curved lcd, 3440x1440

The new Acer Predator X34 claims a “world's first” as a curved 34-inch IPS G-SYNC gaming monitor, and from appearance to specs the new display looks very impressive.

Acer Predator X34.jpg

  • Curved 34-inch IPS 21:9 ultra-wide QHD display
    • 3440x1440 @ 60 Hz resolution
    • 4 ms response time
    • 100,000,000:1 max contrast ratio
    • 300 cd/m2 brightness
    • 1.07 billion colors (10-bit)
    • 100% sRGB
  • Panel supports overclocking to 100Hz
  • NVIDIA G-SYNC technology
  • Two 7W speakers enhanced with DTS Sound
  • Zero frame design maximizes viewing area
  • Tilt from –5 to +35 degrees, height adjustments up to 5 inches
  • Connectivity includes HDMI, DisplayPort 1.2, and 4x USB 3.0 ports

The 60 Hz native refresh rate might cause comment, but the adjustable overclocking up to 100 Hz should satisfy those looking for a better high FPS experience, though at 3440x1440 it would be difficult to max out even 60 Hz with the newest games at ultra settings if you're running a single GPU. And if you do play at the highest settings the included NVIDIA G-SYNC variable refresh technology will certainly help with those moments when the game is outputting much less than 60 FPS.

Acer Predator X34 Back.jpg

So how much will the new Predator X34 set you back? Acer says the monitor will be available “at leading online retailers in the United States” for a cool $1299.

Source: ACER

We really want the ASUS PG279Q - 2560x1440, IPS, G-Sync...165 Hz

Subject: Displays | October 9, 2015 - 06:32 PM |
Tagged: asus, ROG, swift, pg279q, gsync, g-sync, ips

Okay, we see a lot of monitors here at PC Perspective...but this is probably the current "most coveted" of them all. The ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q looks nearly identical to the first generation ROG Swift display but with a couple of key modifications. Yes, this is still a 27-in 2560x1440 monitor but this time...oh this time...it holds a 165 Hz IPS screen.

pg279q-2.jpg

Moving away from the world of TN screens and into the image-quality-improvement of IPS, the PG279Q not only brings ASUS' first G-Sync capable IPS 2560x1440 panel to the world but also ups the ante more than any other screen we have seen when it comes to the maximum refresh rate: this beast will top out at 165 Hz! High performance gamers that have taken to the 144 Hz market will surely see the advantages of stepping up yet again though I am curious how ASUS is able to drive an IPS screen at this speed without artifacts or issues. 

pg279q.jpg

Interestingly, this panel not only includes a DisplayPort connection for 165 Hz 2560x1440 throughput but also an HDMI 1.4a input that can run 2560x1440 at 60 Hz, should you need that kind of thing. If you prefer ULMB over G-Sync, you have that option as well. 

pg279q-3.jpg

I'm not sure yet, but I can feel Allyn's trigger finger on the BUY NOW button...if it existed. We don't have pricing and we don't have any update on availability, but if our past experiences with the ROG Swift line are any indication, I have a feeling this display is going to impress.

Source: ASUS

ASUS Officially Launches ROG Swift PG27AQ, 4K IPS G-Sync Monitor

Subject: Displays | October 9, 2015 - 06:13 PM |
Tagged: asus, ROG, swift, pg27aq, 4k, g-sync, gsync

Back at CES we first got to see the ASUS ROG Swift PG27AQ, a 4K resolution IPS G-Sync enabled gaming monitor with all the fit and finish we came to love with the first ROG Swift display. Today, as part of the ROG Unleashed event being held in San Jose, the monitor has been officially unveiled.

pg27aq-2.jpg

The build and specifications remain pretty much unchanged though pricing and availability are still up in the air. 

pg27aq-1.jpg

The ASUS PG27AQ updates and changes the ROG Swift design and style in small areas including adding an illuminated Republic of Gamers logo to the base along with the red circle. The stand includes supports for height adjustment, rotation, and tilt - basically mirroring the capability of the original ROG Swift.

pg27aq-3.jpg

Seeing a 4K IPS G-Sync monitor warms my heart though I wonder if we will need the next generation of NVIDIA GeForce GPUs to be able to power it effectively with a single card. G-Sync variable refresh rate technology does mean that gamers will be able to run at lower frame rates without the worry of screen tearing or judder.

Finally, even though the display has support for HDMI, it will only run at 4K / 24 Hz or 1080p / 60 Hz - there is no true HDMI 2.0 support to be found. The full resolution and refresh rate, as well as G-Sync support, are enabled through the DisplayPort connection only.

Source: ASUS