Computex 2017: Intel 8th Gen Core Processors 30% Faster than 7th Gen

Subject: Processors | May 30, 2017 - 03:00 AM |
Tagged: Intel, computex 2017, computex, coffee lake, 8th generation core

During it's keynote at Computex today, Intel announced the high performane Skylake-X and Kaby Lake-X platforms with CPU core counts as high as 18 (!!) but also gave a brief mention of its upcoming Coffee Lake product, the 8th Generation Core product family.

To quote directly from the Intel press information:

"As we move toward the next generation of computing, Intel also shared its commitment to deliver 8th generational Intel® Core™ processor-based devices by the holiday season, boasting more than 30 percent improvement in performance versus the 7th Gen Intel® Core™ processor."

That is quite the claim, but let's dive into the details.

Based on SYSmark* 2014 v1.5 (Windows Desktop Application Performance). Comparing 7th Gen i7-7500U, PL1=15W TDP, 2C4T, Turbo up to 3.5GHz, Memory: 2x4GB DDR4-2133, vs. Estimates for 8th Gen Core i7: PL1=15W TDP, 4C8T, Turbo up to 4 GHz, Memory: 2x4GB DDR4-2400, Storage: Intel® SSD, Windows* 10 RS2. Power policy assumptions: AC mode. Note: Kaby Lake U42 performance estimates are Pre-Silicon and are subject to change. Pre-Si projections have +/- 7% margin of error.

In a more readable format:

  8th Gen
Core i7
7th Gen
Core i7-7500U
Code name Coffee Lake Kaby Lake
Process Tech 14nm Double Plus Good 14nm+
Cores/Threads 4/8 2/4
Base Clock ? 2.7 GHz
Turbo Clock 4.0 GHz 3.5 GHz
TDP 15 watt 15 watt
Memory 8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 2400 MHz 2133 MHz

The 30% performance claim comes from both a doubling of core and thread count (2- to 4-cores) but also a 500 MHz higher peak Turbo Clock, going from Kaby Lake to Coffee Lake. The testing was done using SYSmark 2014 v1.5, a benchmark that is very burst-centric and is comparable to common productivity tasks. Even with a 15% increase in peak clock speed and a 2x core/thread count, Intel is still able to maintain a 15 watt TDP with this CPU.

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While we might at first expect much larger performance gains with those clock and core count differences, keep in mind that SYSmark as a test has never scaled in such a way. We don't yet know what other considerations might be in place for the 8th Generation Core processor platforms, and how they might affect performance for single of multi-threaded applications.

Intel has given us very little information today on the Coffee Lake designs, but it seems we'll know all about this platform before the end of the year.

Source: Intel

May 30, 2017 | 07:30 AM - Posted by Zoea

I'm starting to really dislike Intel (and I run Intel).

30%? Double the threads. Big wow big brass.

Whatever, tbh. Sorry, in that kind of mood :)

May 30, 2017 | 07:02 PM - Posted by Isaac Johnson

Brian? Are that you? I think you needs to lies down, you is the drunk.

May 30, 2017 | 10:50 AM - Posted by SetiroN

4C 15W CPUs? That's going to be interesting.

May 30, 2017 | 11:28 AM - Posted by StephanS

notice, no base clock.
The 2 core is running a 2.7 ghz to reach 15w

May 30, 2017 | 03:23 PM - Posted by Pinscher

unless your power source is a bicycle with a generate, who cares what wattage your cpu is.

May 30, 2017 | 05:35 PM - Posted by Jeremy Hellstrom

Just every single data centre and large enterprise ... so pretty much no one, right?

May 30, 2017 | 06:54 PM - Posted by Isaac Johnson

And like a billion people who want more performance but still good battery life out of their mobile computers. So, yeah, no one.

June 1, 2017 | 05:10 PM - Posted by biohazard918

Not to mention people like me who like fanless laptops and tablets.

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