Asus Unveils Flagship X370 ROG Crosshair VI Extreme AMD AM4 Motherboard

Subject: Motherboards | July 25, 2017 - 12:16 AM |
Tagged: ryzen, RGB LED, overclocking, e-atx, asus, AM4

Asus recently took the wraps off of its X370 ROG Crosshair VI Extreme E-ATX motherboard which is the company’s new flagship motherboard for the AMD Ryzen platform. The new board is packed with features and is aimed at extreme overclockers and gaming enthusiasts.

The massive board surrounds the AMD AM4 socket with four DDR4 DIMM slots, a 12 phase Digi+ VRM, and a plethora of expansion and storage connections including two PCI-E 3.0 x16, one PCI-E 2.0 x16, three PCI-E 2.0 x1, two M.2 slots, and 8 SATA 6Gbps ports. One of the M.2 slots sits under the passive PCH heatsink and connects directly to the CPU while the other M.2 slot does not benefit from the passive heatsink and shares bandwidth with the PCI-E 2.0 lanes coming from the chipset.

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The board has a massive VRM heatsink that can also be swapped out for a monoblock that can be integrated into a custom water cooling loop with ASUS partnering with Bitspower for a monoblock that will be sold separately (the board will also work with monoblocks from other manufacturers) and will include sensors to measure flow rate, temperature, and leak detection. The board also has a header that will allow you to attach those same sensors to another point in your loop with all the sensor data being available through ASUS’ Fan Xpert 4 software. There are 13 fans headers on board (16 with fan extension card) with one dedicated pump header and two groups of four fan headers that are placed closed together to make wiring up radiators a bit cleaner. The X370 ROG Crosshair VI Extreme also sports multiple RGB LED lighting zones and two headers that will allow users to extend the lighting to RGB LED strips, fans, and cases (one header is for addressable LEDs and the other is for standard LED strips up to 3A). The on board lighting zones include the IO and VRM cooler, the two SafeSlot (metal-reinforced) PCI-E x16 slots, the chipset heatsink, and the right edge of the board. The audio jacks are also LED color coded which is actually kind of cool since it can be hard to see what colors the jacks are when the case is under a desk! Other useful features include an ROG backplate and a right angle 24-pin power connector to make cable management a bit easier. There are also the usual overclocker friendly error code display, power and reset buttons, and voltage read points for multimeters. Further, the board features a dedicated base clock generator and a “TPU” (TurboV Processing Unit) that helps manage voltage to the VRMs and controls the clock generator. The external clock generator is important when overclocking Ryzen and hitting extremely high memory frequencies.

Asus is using an Intel I211-AT Gigabit Ethernet controller for the wired networking and there is also support for Intel 8265-powered 802.11 ac Wi-Fi. Sound is handled by a SupremeFX  S122 codec paired with ES9023P ESS Sabre DAC with high end capacitors and TI op-amps for a 113 dB line in (for recording) and 120 dB output.

Rear I/O is where the Extreme board is a bit wanting with:

  • 2 x Antenna connectors
  • 2 x USB 3.1 Gen 2
  • 6 x USB 3.1 Gen 1
  • 4 x USB 2.0
  • 5 x Gold plated 3.5mm jacks
  • 1 x S/PDIF (Optical)
  • 2 x Clear CMOS and BIOS Flashback buttons

On one hand, I am not sure what else they could have included (Thunderbolt is really the only missing thing and not strictly needed), but it does look a bit barren even compared to the Crosshair VI Hero.

Asus’ flagship AMD AM4 motherboard will be available in early August with an MSRP of $349.

I am interested to see if the X370 ROG Crosshair VI Extreme really does up the ante especially in the overclocking department versus the ROG Crosshair VI Hero which seems to be a popular choice for overclockers aiming to break records. I am looking forward to reviews to see whether the $100 premium is worth it (the Crosshair VI Hero is $245 or $270 with AC Wi-Fi).

Personally, I think I would rather go with a cheaper motherboard and better graphics card or SSD, but for those not on a budget I can see them opting for the board with all the bells and whistles (and RGB)!

Source: Asus

July 25, 2017 | 06:25 AM - Posted by djotter

Can't remember the last time I saw a motherboard without any video out ports on the back.
That 90 degree 24 pin is a pretty nice touch. I always have to coax those 24 wires 180 degrees!

July 25, 2017 | 08:53 AM - Posted by Tim Verry

Agreed, I wish all motherboards had the 24 pin connector like that, it's always a pain for cable management and over time the strain has made it so that i have to get the connector plugged in (but ever so slightly not heh) or else the mobo simply wont power on. Granted my PC is ancient now but still if it had that right angle connection it likely wouldnt be a problem. (You would not believe how crazy i was going trying to diagnose the no pkwer issue after taking everything apart and moving to a new case lol. Tried everything and then it ended up being just a little jiggling on the 2r pin and it came alive again! go figure! :-) )

July 25, 2017 | 10:00 PM - Posted by Wpperslepz (not verified)

New product roadmap on AMD's Investor Relations page below!

Under the "Investor Resources" heading on the linked to page there is a link to a PDF:

Product Roadmaps[PDF] New

http://ir.amd.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=74093&p=irol-irhome

July 25, 2017 | 01:45 PM - Posted by CNote

My old Sandy Bridge P8P67 deluxe had no video out. My ASRock x370 killer only has an HDMI out.

July 25, 2017 | 05:11 PM - Posted by ImBlindedByDemLights (not verified)

New AMD product roadmap up at AMD website, and Q2 earnings report, and the X399 MBs are up for pre-order in around 24 Hrs.

There should be no problem customizing your XMAS tree lighting with the provided LED controllers on the new X399 MBs! Some makers are even providing LED lighting strips, so Ho Ho Ho! Merry RIG-MAS to all you flashing light freaks!

July 25, 2017 | 09:49 PM - Posted by Mutation666

Still waiting on mATX boards of worth, stop making good ATX boards there is already tons of those.

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