Whose is longer, AMD's Ryzen Mobile or Intel's Kaby Lake-R?

Subject: Mobile | November 30, 2017 - 03:07 PM |
Tagged: hp, Envy x360, ryzen mobile, Ryzen 5 2500U

The Tech Report have been spending quite a bit of time with the Ryzen powered HP Envy x360, contrasting its performance to Intel based laptops.  They have moved from performance to battery life, something which means a great deal to those who travel with laptops or simply want to use the laptop without getting tangled in cords.  Their focus in this look at battery life is the impact of using an external screen only, with the built-in display disabled.  They chose a 2560x1440 display and tested the Envy against a Acer Swift 3 with an Intel i5-8250U to see how long the battery lasts without needing to power the integral display.  The results are quite striking and show a large difference in power efficiency.

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"As we've continued testing AMD's Ryzen 5 2500U APU over the past few days, we've been confronted with the problem of comparing battery life across laptops with different screen sizes. Many readers suggested that I should take each machine's internal display out of the picture by hooking them up to external monitors. While I wanted to get real-world battery-life testing out of the way first, I can certainly appreciate the elegance of leveling the playing field that way. Now we have."

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November 30, 2017 | 03:26 PM - Posted by Anonymouse (not verified)

That's the most bogus way to attempt to test a an APU I've ever seen. They have no idea what's happening behind the scenes and just assume by not using the internal display that this somehow makes it test the "more better" .

The real issue here is what is wrong with the Acer display that its using that much power???

November 30, 2017 | 04:35 PM - Posted by Power (not verified)

"what is wrong with the Acer display"
High quality (back)light is not the most efficient.

December 1, 2017 | 09:04 PM - Posted by quest4glory

No, it's another way to grab another data point.

There's nothing "bogus" about it when you test it that way under full transparency. All other things remaining equal (we know they're not, exactly) you can at least tell from a system level what the overall difference is between the two *laptops* with different SOCs / chips powering them without the display impacting the data.

November 30, 2017 | 07:56 PM - Posted by Brother Michigan (not verified)

Unfortunately, this sort of testing reveals very little about Ryzen's power efficiency, but rather more about this particular HP laptop against that particular Acer laptop. There are so many other variables at play that meaningful conclusions are very difficult to make.

November 30, 2017 | 08:21 PM - Posted by Mr.Gold (not verified)

First laptop... and only laptop. AMD must have overseen a lot, yet it perform horribly.

over 200% less efficient ! And Lisa Su , AMD CEO bought one at best buy.

Same old AMD :(

December 1, 2017 | 12:13 AM - Posted by LappyOEMsAreNotAMDsoBlameTheOEM (not verified)

Same old Intel with pushing that thin and crappy Ultrabook laptop form factor onto the entire NON APPLE OEM laptop market. So it's Intel's fault for being such an abusive monopoly intrest and lording over the Laptop OEMs for so many years. Intel ruined the regular form factor Laptop SKU where folks could get more value for their money.

So do not blame AMD, blame the Laptop OEMs and Intel for pushing out that Ultrabook turd laptop form factor and forcing the NON Apple laptop ecosystem users to suffer laptop overpricing with poor system performance.

Intel loved charging the same amount of money for its crappy U series dual core i7s/i5s as it did for its quad core i7 laptop SKUs in the past. And Intel sure got a lot more of those carppy dual core U series i7s/i5s per wafer so Intel effectively doubled its pricing and gouged the slack jawed yokels for all that it could take from the fools.

AMD's Raven Ridge competition has forced Intel to bring back the quad cores to the mainstream laptop market in an attempt to match Zen/Raven Ridge's APU value. But look to the Raven Ridge APU's graphics and that's way ahead of Intel's doog food integrated graphics and that's just using the Vega/8 nCU graphics with the Vega/10 nCU graphics based laptop APU SKUs arriving soon.

I'll take a desktop Raven Ridge APU inside of a Laptop and that SKU at 35-65 Watts will be hard to match for price/performance with maybe the full Vega/11 nCUs and that's something Intel can not match without some discrete mobile GPU help and a much higher cost.

And oh looky here! Intel is purchasing a semi-custom AMD GPU die just like an AMD discrete GPU AIB partner for Intel to place on that EMIB package to help where Intel's dog food integrated graphics has failed.

December 1, 2017 | 09:05 PM - Posted by quest4glory

I don't know anyone in the real world who has compared the MacBook Air or similar Intel ultrabook designs to a "turd." Not a single person. Quite the opposite, actually.

December 1, 2017 | 06:49 AM - Posted by JohnGR

It will be funny if they where testing with HP's Touchpoint Analytics Service running in the background.

Anyway, hope to see better numbers from future Ryzen laptops.

December 5, 2017 | 07:46 AM - Posted by JohnGR

Looks like an HP problem after all, not an AMD problem

techreport.com/news/32920/report-hp-envy-x360-battery-life-drags-regardless-of-cpu-vendor

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