Will you still need me when I'm sixty; four generations of mid ranged GTXes on Linux;

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 21, 2016 - 02:04 PM |
Tagged: gtx 460, gtx 760, gtx 960, gtx 1060, fermi, kepler, maxwell, pascal

Phoronix took a look at how NVIDIA's mid range cards performance on Linux has changed over the past four generations of GPU, from Fermi, through Kepler, Maxwell, and finally Pascal.  CS:GO was run at 4k to push the newer GPUs as was DOTA, much to the dismay of the GTX 460.  The scaling is rather interesting, there is a very large delta between Fermi and Kepler which comes close to being replicated when comparing Maxwell to Pascal.  From the looks of the vast majority of the tests, the GTX 1060 will be a noticeable upgrade for Linux users no matter which previous mid range card they are currently using.  We will likely see a similar article covering AMD in the near future.

View Full Size

"To complement yesterday's launch-day GeForce GTX 1060 Linux review, here are some more benchmark results with the various NVIDIA x60 graphics cards I have available for testing going back to the GeForce GTX 460 Fermi. If you are curious about the raw OpenGL/OpenCL/CUDA performance and performance-per-Watt for these mid-range x60 graphics cards from Fermi, Kepler, Maxwell, and Pascal, here are these benchmarks from Ubuntu 16.04 Linux." Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: Phoronix

Video News


July 21, 2016 | 04:58 PM - Posted by taisserrootseasyaccount (not verified)

This may be unrelated by a small margin, but this is about an OS.
I have an 8.1 retail key. If I upgrade to windows 10 will that key still have retail status

July 21, 2016 | 05:06 PM - Posted by taisserrootseasyaccount (not verified)

?*
Question marks taisserroots. Remember to use them

July 21, 2016 | 05:39 PM - Posted by CNote (not verified)

I used to run Linux only for about 2 years and got into War Thunder, ran pretty damn well on my gtx 650 ti, even while watching a movie on another screen.

July 21, 2016 | 06:46 PM - Posted by remc86007

Most of your titles go over my head, Jeremy, but I got that one. haha

July 22, 2016 | 10:16 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

OpenGL/OpenCL/CUDA is what was tested, so where are the Vulkan results. Let's see some long term testing results over the next year on Vulkan and against AMD measuring the overall improvement on each GPU maker's SKUs from the current and previous 2 generations of GPUs. With some new benchmarking tools that can measure/stress test any hardware based Async-Compute functionality that a GPU may or may not have.

There is plenty of code to test a CPU's in hardware async-compute ability it should not be hard to convert that code/formulas over to the GPU's instruction sets and test those processor threads out for single core efficiency and multi-processor-threads per core efficiency!

July 24, 2016 | 03:47 AM - Posted by Anonymous (not verified)

"There is plenty of code to test a CPU's in hardware async-compute ability it should not be hard to convert that code/formulas over to the GPU's instruction sets and test those processor threads out for single core efficiency and multi-processor-threads per core efficiency!"
Wow! Well, I'd appreciate if you'd get on that as soon as possible. I mean if it's not hard, could you get it done by next weekend maybe?

July 26, 2016 | 04:30 PM - Posted by Stefem (not verified)

Don't bother him, he is the holy grail expert on scheduling, he doesn't have time for us mortals but it usually post in GPU related news where it give us such an amazing pearls of wisdom that opens ours mind....

Post new comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd> <blockquote><p><br>
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.

More information about formatting options

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.