Making HEDT great again

Subject: General Tech | October 11, 2017 - 12:37 PM |
Tagged: X399, x299, Threadripper, skylake-x, ryzen, Intel, amd

Over at [H]ard|OCP is a look at the current market and the resurgence of competition which we are currently enjoying.  As opposed to several pages of detailed benchmarks, the article focuses on the various feature sets that AMD and Intel currently offer and the effect it has on your current system choices.  They consider a wide variety of aspects, from the quality and quantity of PCIe lanes offered on X399 and X299 platforms through to the very different choices the companies have made when it comes to PCIe storage and RAID.  It has been quite a while since we have seen the competition between AMD and Intel heat up to these levels and it is wonderful to see. 

HeadtoHeadRhinos-640x410.jpg

"I’ve spent quite a bit of time with AMD’s Threadripper and X399 chipset and I thought I’d give our readers my impression of it and talk about the platform as well as giving interested consumers a general overview of the platform and what it has to offer. We compare it to Intel’s HEDT platform and give our take on this match up."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

The unofficial launch of the GTX 1070 Ti

Subject: General Tech | October 10, 2017 - 12:52 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, leak, gtx 1070 ti

Over at TechARP is a compilation of all the information which has leaked out about NVIDIA's upcoming GTX 1070 Ti.  Perhaps the two most important pieces of data were the scheduled launch date of October 26th and the MSRP of $429; though considering the current state of the GPU market supplies will dry up and the price shoot up very quickly.  The card is closer to a GTX 1080, sporting the same base frequency but a boost clock of 1683 MHz which is 50MHz less than a stock GTX 1080.  The card will have fewer CUDA cores, a total of 2432 along with 64 ROPs.  The 8GB of memory will provide 256 GB/s of memory bandwidth, somewhat short of the 320 GB/s a GTX 1080 offers.  Pop by TechARP for more leaked details.

1070ti.PNG

"As mentioned above, the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti is expected to have a launch price of US$ 429. Of course, the actual street prices will be somewhat higher, and there will be different overclocked versions offered at higher prices."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: TechARP

Everyone panic, AIM is shutting down!

Subject: General Tech | October 6, 2017 - 02:32 PM |
Tagged: aol, aim, ancient

You heard right, AOL Instant Messenger is actually still running and there are people still using it who will find this news distressing.  You have until December 15th to download any files you might have stored there, though your buddy list will not make it unless someone out there designs a third party tool.  We lost Geocities in 2009; what's next, MySpace? 

Pop over to Slashdot to make a few cracks or head here to reset your password if you actually remember your username.

get_new_aim_username.png

"However, AIM couldn't make the seamless transition to mobile, where most users rely on instant messaging services. Users will be able to manually download any images or files on AIM before the service shuts down. However, users won't be able to export or save their Buddy List, the group of contacts available on AIM."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Slashdot

Comcast Launches New Xfinity Instant TV Streaming Service

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2017 - 04:23 PM |
Tagged: xfinity, streaming tv, iptv, data caps, cord cutting, Comcast

Comcast is hoping to entice its internet only customers to add cable TV and its current cable TV customers to not fully cut the cord with its new Xfinity Instant TV. The new streaming TV service starts at $18 (plus those darn broadcast/TV fees Comcast loves so much) and will soon be available to all current Comcast broadband subscribers. The base package includes access to local broadcast channels, a video on demand library, and a cloud DVR with 20 hours of storage. Users can stream live and on demand TV and movies using the Xfinity Stream application on mobile devices and Rokus, the browser-based website on desktops, or TV Everywhere logins at the individual networks' websites or apps (e.g. HBO Go).

Xfinity Stream.png

For those looking for a bit more TV than what they can get over the air with an antenna, Comcast is offering three add-on packages for additional monthly fees as well as allowing users to add HBO and Starz for the standard rates ($15 for HBO). The tiers are laid out as follows:

Limited Basic (base package)

Popular broadcast channels (vary by market) including ABC, CBS, CW, FOX, NBC, PBS, Telemundo, Unimas, Univision, C-SPAN, and other public, education, and government (PEG) channels.

  • Entertainment (+ $15/month):
    • A&E, AMC, Animal Planet, BET, Bravo, Comedy Central, Discovery Channel, E!, Food Network, FX, FXX, Hallmark Channel, History, HGTV, Lifetime, OWN, SyFy, TBS, TNT, TV One, USA, and VHI
  • Kids and Family (+ $10/month):
    • Cartoon Network, Disney Channel, Disney Junior, Disney XD, Freeform, MTV, National Geographic Channel, Nick Jr., Nickelodeon, NickToons, Universal Kids, TeenNick, and TLC
  • Sports and News (+ $30/month):
    • CNBC, CNN, ESPN, ESPN2, ESPN News, ESPNU, Fox Business, Fox News, Fox Sports 1, Golf Channel, MSNBC, NBC Sports, NFL Network, and regional sports that vary on market

Comcast has broken its channels into three main add-on packages that allow potential cord cutters to pick and choose what they want to pay for (though it's not full a la carte yet). Those packages are a bit pricey though if you only want some of the channels in the package, particularly the Sports and News package at $30 a month (and likely having to also pay the Sports broadcast fee regular cable customers have to pay whether they watch sports or not) which would be better broken out as separate packages and even the sports package could have regional channels broken out to its own add-on.

In another interesting twist though, Comcast announced that its new Xfinity Instant TV service will not count against users' data caps giving the service a marked advantage over IPTV competitors like YouTube TV, Hulu Live, PlayStation Vue, and others. If you live in a capped market, Instant TV starts to look a bit better price wise if you are a heavy data user as you could avoid data cap overage charges as a result of TV viewing.

On the other hand caveats include a limited DVR (though you can watch On Demand usually the next day) that can only record two shows simultaneously and live TV is, for the most part, limited to your own in-home network. When you are outside of your home network you will be limited to on demand streaming and recordings depending on licensing rights.

I think Comcast is hoping that the new service will entice cable TV holdouts wanting cheaper bills to stay in some fashion as well as entice internet only users and users that have cut the cord already to use Instant TV as a sort of gateway drug to traditional cable. Since they ahve to pay the same TV fees (though no fees for boxes), they might as well upgrade to X1 for a bit more and get more channels and more DVR--or at least that's the idea. I'm not convinced that plan will work though with the current pricing though. I suppose we will just have to wait and see!

What are your thoughts on Xfinity Instant TV? If you are interested in the service, you can check availability in your market (and Internet only customers can get a free 30-day trial) at www.xfinity.com/instant-tv.

Google Announces High-End Convertible Pixelbook Running Chrome OS

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2017 - 02:35 PM |
Tagged: pixelbook, google, convertible tablet, Chromebook, chrome os

Google is dipping its Chrome toes into high end Chromebook territory again with the launch of a new thin and light convertible tablet called the Google Pixelbook. The 12.3” notebook is constructed of premium aluminum and glass components and packs 8th Generation refreshed Kaby Lake CPUs, up to 16 GB of RAM, and up to 512 GB of solid state storage. The Pixelbook has a Yoga-style folding multi-touch display and measures less than half an inch think (10.3mm) and weighs a smidge over 2 pounds (1.1kg).

Pixelbook_Hero_US.width-1000.jpg

The Pixelbook has a classy two tone metal and glass design with straight lines and flat edges save for the front edge that has rounded corners. On the inside, the top half is dominated by a 12.3” touchscreen with a resolution of 2400x1600 (Google did not reveal the panel type but did note that it has enough brightness to be used outdoors), paired with a webcam. The display and Wi-Fi antenna area are covered with glass. The bottom half features a backlit keyboard and trackpad that uses almost all the available space of the 12.3” Chromebook.

Internally, the Pixelbook is powered by an Intel Kaby Lake (refresh) processor (in i5 or i7 SKUs), from 8 GB to 16 GB of RAM, and 128 GB, 256 GB, or 512 GB of SSD storage depending on the model you purchase. Google has set up the Pixelbook so that it can automatically pair with a Pixel smartphone for tethered data on the go. The battery in the Pixelbook is rated for 10 hours and has a quick charge feature that offers up to 2 hours of usage on a 15-minute charge.

The display is multi-touch, and users can optionally purchase the new (Wacom developed) active electrostatic Pixelbook Pen for $99 and use the AI-powered handwriting recognition and Google Assistant functionality with the stylus. Google claims the pen has 2,000 levels of pressure sensitivity and 60-degrees of angular recognition, and thanks to machine learning, 10ms response time.

Speaking of Google Assistant, the Pixelbook features a Google Assistant key on the keyboard where the Windows key normally resides. The pen can be used to highlight text and interact with the AI assistant as well.

The Google Pixelbook is available for pre-order now at the Google Web Store and Best Buy and will be up for purchase by October 31st. The base model with an i5, 8GB of RAM, and 128 GB of SSD storage is $999. Moving to 256 GB of storage gets you to $1199 and upgrading all the specs to an i7, 16 GB RAM, and 512 GB NVMe SSD pushes the price to $1699.

The high-end Chromebook is a bit of an odd market, but the primarily web application-based Chrome OS continues to inch towards being able to take advantage of the local processing power with the ability to run apps not only from the Chrome Web Store but also run Android applications and store and run more stuff (like media and document creation) when offline. No doubt the Pixelbook looks classy, but it is putting itself in the same territory as iPad Pros and Surface products (Surface Books and Surface Pro tablets) as well as most of the premium ultrabook and thin and light laptop and tablets running full versions of Windows.

What are your thoughts on the new Pixelbook? Would you buy one? 

Source: Google

iOS and Android have Edge? Lord!

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2017 - 12:11 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, ios, edge, Android

Microsoft is adding an Edge-y experience to mobile devices not running the rarely seen Windows Mobile.  Android users who never heard of Arrow will now not know it as Microsoft Launcher; those who try will find a Chromium based browser which resembles Edge and knows a few of its tricks.  iOS users will be running Safari WebKit wrapped all the way to the Edge of their screens.  In both cases Edge will offer the same cross-system abilities as it does on PC, allowing you to immediately resume reading a document and sync apps from or to your mobile device.  That functionality does have prerequisites, you would need to be using a PC running Windows as one of your devices and it has to have the Fall Creators Update installed, which hasn't yet been pushed out.  If you haven't yet fallen asleep, you can continue on Ars Technica.

edge-launcher-ios-android-800x450.jpg

"As with Edge, the important part of the Launcher is the cross-device experience. Documents and photos has a "continue on PC" option that will open them up on a computer, making it easier to start working on the phone and then resume on a computer."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Ars Technica

Podcast #470 - Intel VROC, AMD TR RAID, Google Pixel 2, and more!

Subject: General Tech | October 5, 2017 - 10:39 AM |
Tagged: Zotac Zbox, Z370 Godlike, VROC, video, usb 3.2, Samsung Odyssey, ryzen, PS2000e, podcast, Pixel 2 XL, Pixel 2, Pinnacle, msi, lumberyard, Intel, Grado, google, Glaive, cryorig h5 ultimate, corsair, Cooler Master Cosmos C700P, AWS, apple, amd, a11

PC Perspective Podcast #470 - 10/05/17

Join us for discussion on Intel VROC, AMD TR RAID, Google Pixel 2, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jermey Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:41:19

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
    1. Allyn: 1:38:20 Want a big SATA SSD?
  4. Closing/outro

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Source:

Render Token Announces Render Token

Subject: General Tech | October 4, 2017 - 09:19 PM |
Tagged: render token, ethereum, 3D rendering

You know how people have been buying up GPUs to mine coin? A new company, Render Token, has just announced a service that works in a similar way, except that the output is rendered images. A better example would be something like Folding@Home, but the user is paid for the work that their computer performs. The CEO and the President, Jules Urbach and Alissa Grainger respectively, are co-founders of OTOY, which does GPU- and Cloud-accelerated rendering.

According to Jules Urbach at Unite Austin, they are apparently paying, deliberately, more than ethereum would give users for the same amount of processing power.

I am... torn on this issue. On the one hand, it’s a cool application of crowd-sourced work, and it helps utilize idle silicon scattered around the globe. On the other hand, I hope that this won’t kick GPU supply levels while they’re down. Sure, at least there’s some intrinsic value to the workload, but I can just see people sticking racks of caseless systems in their basement, while gamers keep browsing Amazon for something under four digits (excluding the cents) to appear in stock.

What do you all think? Does the workload usefulness dull the pain?

Source: Render Token

OTOY Discussed AI Denoising at Unite Austin

Subject: General Tech | October 4, 2017 - 08:59 PM |
Tagged: 3D rendering, otoy, Unity, deep learning

When raytracing images, sample count has a massive impact on both quality and rendering performance. This corresponds to the number of rays within a pixel that were cast, which, when averaged out over many, many rays, eventually matches what the pixel should be. Think of it this way: if your first ray bounces directly into a bright light, and the second ray bounces into the vacuum of space, should the color be white? Black? Half-grey? Who knows! However, if you send 1000 rays with some randomized pattern, then the average is probably a lot closer to what it should be (which depends on how big the light is, what it bounces off of, etc.).

At Unite Austin, which started today, OTOY showed off an “AI temporal denoiser” algorithm for raytraced footage. Typically, an artist chooses a sample rate that looks good enough to the end viewer. In this case, the artist only needs to choose enough samples that an AI can create a good-enough video for the end user. While I’m curious how much performance is required in the inferencing stage, I do know how much a drop in sample rate can affect render times, and it’s a lot.

Check out OTOY’s video, embed above.

The vintage Star Wars: Battlefront 2 is back!

Subject: General Tech | October 4, 2017 - 02:06 PM |
Tagged: gaming, Star Wars, Star Wars Battlefront 2, gamespy

We lost access to the original Star Wars Battlefront 2 back in 2014 when Gamespy's servers were shut down but thanks to a dedicated group of fans and support from Disney the game is once again playable. There are some issues currently, from servers not responding to deadly lag but there is a team working to resolve the issues.  From the trailer released earlier this week, linked below, we can see that the new version about to be released is nowhere near as disappointing as the reboot of 2015.  There will be far more maps, vehicle and heroes in the new game but we have yet to see if it will match the fun that was the original.  Hopefully it will, but it won't match the current price of $4 on GoG.

YgOmHX3.png

"Battlefront 2's online relaunch doesn't seem to be going entirely smoothly for everyone, though. The game's Steam forums are currently clogged with threads such as Online is back but I can t [sic] play it, Can't join any servers, Multiplayer crashing and Insane server lag."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

Source: Ars Technica

The price competition is Ryzen even before the Coffee is poured

Subject: General Tech, Processors | October 4, 2017 - 01:05 PM |
Tagged: amd, ryzen, price cuts

AMD is slashing prices on their Ryzen line of CPUs, and not just in the UK.   A Ryzen 7 1800X in the US will cost you only $400 if you skip out on the Wraith cooler, or $500 if you are in Canada.  If that is a little too rich a 1700X is $295 or $415 in Canada, though the 1700 with Wraith cooler at $370 might be a better deal.  The price cuts come just before the launch of Intel's Coffee Lake processors so you might want to wait a day or so for reviews to appear.  The price cuts could also signal AMD's desire to move stock before the launch of Pinnacle in a few months.

Wasn't that much more pleasant than finding out the IRS plans to crowd source their tax fraud investigations by awarding a $7m contract to Equifax who can count on everyone who grabbed your leaked personal information to do their work for them?

51bG36hujfL._SL1001_.jpg

"They also coincide with rumours that AMD plans to launch a new series of Ryzen parts in February, based on 12nm process technology. The AMD Ryzen ‘Pinnacle' parts will be part of a shift of both CPUs and GPUs to GlobalFoundries 12nm LP [leading performance] process during 2018."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Samsung Odyssey VR Headset Announced

Subject: General Tech | October 3, 2017 - 10:00 PM |
Tagged: VR, Samsung, pc gaming, microsoft

The upcoming Fall Creators Update will be Microsoft’s launch into XR with headsets from a variety of vendors. You can now add Samsung to that list with their Odyssey VR headset and motion controllers, which is important for two reasons. First, Samsung has a lot experience in VR technology as they lead the charge (with their partner, Oculus) in the mobile space.

samsung-2017-odyssey-pc-vr-headset.png

Second, and speaking of Oculus, the Samsung Odyssey actually has a higher resolution than both it and the HTC Vive (2880x1600 total for Samsung vs 2160 x 1200 total for the other two). This doesn’t seem like a lot, but it’s actually 77% more pixels, which might be significant for text and other fine details. The refresh rate is still 90 Hz, and the field of view is around 110 degrees, which is the same as the HTC Vive. Of course the screen technology, itself, is AMOLED, being that it’s from Samsung and deeper blacks are more important in an enclosed cavity than brightness. In fact, you probably want to reduce brightness in a VR headset so you don’t strain the eyes.

According to Peter Bright of Ars Technica, Microsoft is supporting SteamVR titles, which gives the platform a nice catalog to launch with. The Samsung Odyssey VR headset launched November 6th for $499 USD.

Source: Microsoft

Asus ROG Strix GL753VD; gaming with limits

Subject: General Tech | October 3, 2017 - 01:16 PM |
Tagged: asus, ASUS ROG, strix, GL753VD, gaming notebook, gtx 1050

There are some things to like about this ASUS ROG Strix laptop, the Core i5 7300HQ with up to 12GB of DDR4 is nothing to sneer at and the inclusion of an M.2 SSD and USB 3.1 Type-C port will be appreciated.  On the other hand the 17.3" IPS display has a 1080p resolution and it is powered by a GTX 1050 which is simply not enough to power a VR headset.  The price is around $1000, making it more affordable than many gaming laptops but as Kitguru points out, by sacrificing the IPS display for a TN you can choose from a variety of models which house a GTX 1060.  You can see the full series of benchmarks they performed here.

ROG-GL753VD-Front-2-300x206.jpg

"Unfortunately, though the ROG Strix GL753VD has the tagline “gaming without limits”, its relatively low-end Nvidia GTX 1050 graphics chip makes it likely that those limits will crop up rather sooner than the average gamer might like, especially in demanding titles. So can the rest of the package and its overall price still convince?"

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

More Mobile Articles

 

Source: Kitguru

Roku's new update will rock you

Subject: General Tech | October 3, 2017 - 12:41 PM |
Tagged: roku

Roku announced updated hardware and software today, which The Register linked to here.  The Roku Express and Roku Express+ have had a speed upgrade, with an increase in responsiveness of five times while the Streaming Stick and Streaming Stick+ now come with a voice activated remote, the higher end model will be capable of 4K and 4K HDR up to 60fps.  The top end Roku Ultra offers the same features as its predecessor but now at a lower price. 

More interesting is the software update, Roku OS 8 now lets you search over the air TV in its menu if you have an antenna configured and if you have an account with providers such as Dish, Cox or AT&T you will be able to access them on your Roku.  You should expect to see the update become available for existing Roku devices as well as these new models later this month.

Roku-streaming-player-lineup-2017-animated_TW.gif

"The company is still leading the streaming media box market, in large part because it is simply better and offers more than its main competitors in AppleTV, Amazon's Fire TV, and Google's Chromecast."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

USB-IF Publishes USB 3.2 Specification Rated At 20 Gbps With Multi-Lane Operation

Subject: General Tech | October 3, 2017 - 12:00 AM |
Tagged: usb 3.2, usb-if, USB 3 Type-C, type c, usb

The USB Implementers Forum recently published and made official the specifications for the USB 3.2 standard first introduced in near-final form by the USB 3.0 Promoters Group back in July. The USB 3.2 standard specifies the physical and logical techniques for transferring data over physical USB cables (which are now all specified under their own standards decoupled from the USB 3.2 data transfer specifications) at up to 20 Gbps (~2 GB/s) using two 10 Gbps channels and the same signaling and 128b/132b encoding used by USB 3.1.

usb3.1-3.jpg

Like Thunderbolt, USB 3.2 takes advantage of multiple lanes to achieve the total bandwidth rather than trying to clock and run a single channel at twice the speed which is incredibly complex. In the case of USB 3.2, the specification defines two channels that can run 2 x 5 Gbps or 2 x 10 Gbps depending on the cable used with USB 3.1 Gen 1 (5 Gbps) or USB 3.1 Gen 2 (10 Gbps) cables respectively. In fact, users will be able to re-use their existing USB Type C cables to connect USB 3.2 hosts to USB 3.2 devices so long as they are up to spec. The USB-IF is able to achieve this by using the extra wire pairs in the Type C cables to enable the two lane operation. (5 Gbs cables would be upgraded to 10 Gbps speeds and 10 Gbps cables would be upgraded to 20 Gbps speeds when used with 3.2 hardware at both ends.)

The specification is expected to be finalized by the end of the year with USB 3.2 controllers and other hardware to begin production and roll outs in 2018. Devices supporting the faster USB 3.2 standard are expected as soon as 2019. Desktop users should get access first in the form of PCI-E add-on cards with new USB 3.2 controllers from third parties with native CPU and chipset support from AMD and Intel following in a generation or two (processor generation that is). Laptop and mobile users will have to wait until at least 2019 if not later for the faster standard to come standard.

It is interesting that they have decoupled the USB data transfer standard from the physical cable standards. It seems that USB Type C cables are the star of the show, but that cables like Type A and Micro cables are not going away and could be used with USB 3.2 with the caveat that you would need to buy new USB 3.2 cables which should be backwards compatible with older USB standards but current cables (SuperSpeed Type C cables being the exception) aren't forwards compatible--they might work but will support the higher speeds. At least that is my understanding of it. I am curious if Type C will be more prevalent with USB 3.2 or if we will still see motherboards with a single USB Type C nestled among many more Type A ports. I suppose the number of Type C vs Type A ports will all depend on how many new devices adopt Type C as the USB 3.2 physical interface of choice though, something we will just have to wait and see on! It is nice to see some competition for Thunderbolt though even at 20 Gbps USB 3.2 still lags behind the 40 Gbps of Thunderbolt 3 (20 Gbps with passive copper cables) which Intel is allegedly planning to make royalty free next year. USB 3.2 also has more overhead and is less ideal for things like external graphics. On the other hand, it may just be the cheap enough and fast enough connector that will get the design wins while Thunderbolt continues to be more of a prosumer and professional interface for the higher end and expensive motherboards, PCs, and end devices.

If you are interested in the new 20 Gbps USB 3.2 specifications, the USB-IF has provided a 103 MB zip file with several documents including a 548 page PDF of the new standard and a redline comparison between it and USB 3.1 among other related documents for developers.

Source: USB-IF

AMD Releases NVMe RAID Support for X399 Threadripper Platform

Subject: General Tech | October 2, 2017 - 04:12 PM |
Tagged: X399, Threadripper, nvme raid, NVMe, amd, 960 PRO

A recent support page and community update posting suggest that NVMe RAID support is coming to Threadripper and the X399 platform imminently (as soon as motherboard manufacturers release an updated BIOS/UEFI). AMD will support up to six NVMe drives without adapters in a RAID 0, 1, or 10 array with all the drives wired directly to the PCI-E controller in the CPU rather than being routed through the chipset (meaning no DMI bottlenecking). There are no limits on the brand of drives and the NVMe RAID update is free with no hardware or software keys needed to unlock it.

AMD X399 NVMe RAID.png

NVMe SSDs are very fast on their own, but when combined in a RAID array directly wired to the CPU things really get interesting. AMD claims that it saw read speeds of 21.2 GB/s when reading from six Samsung 960 Pro 512 GB drives in a RAID 0 array! The company also saw near perfect scaling with their test array (when adding up to six drives over a single drive) with reads scaling 6x on reads and 5.38x on writes. Intel's VROC seems to have the theoretical performance advantage here with the ability to RAID more total drives (four per VMD and three VMDs per CPU) but only after purchasing a hardware key and when using more than one VMD it can't be a bootable OS array. When it comes to bootable arrays, AMD would appear to have the upper hand with free support for up to six drives that can be used to run your bootable OS array! Windows has never booted faster! (heh)

Along with its partners releasing BIOS updates, AMD is releasing updates to its NVMe RAID Driver (version 17.50) and RAIDXpert2 Windows management ultility. Currently, Windows 10 x64 build 1703 is officially supported and fresh installs of Windows are recommended (and if you are currently running your Windows OS off of a RAID array a fresh install is required).

AMD Threadripper X399 NVMe RAID IoMeter.png

Once BIOS updates are available (and they are coming shortly), users will have to jump through a few hoops to get a NVMe RAID up and running, but those hoops may just be worth it for enthusiasts wanting the best storage performance! For one, if you have a RAID array (bootable or not) you will not be able to do an in-place upgrade. If you have a SATA RAID you must back up your data and break down the array before updating the UEFI/BIOS and installing the Windows driver. Further, if your existing array is bootable with your operating system installed on it you will need to back up your data, upgrade the BIOS, and perform a fresh install of Windows with the AMD supplied F6 driver. After upgrading the BIOS, there will be a new menu item (the exact name will vary by manufacturer but SATA Mode and SATA Configuration are likely suspects) where users will need to change the mode from SATA or AHCI to RAID.

Oh, and did I mention to back up your data before diving into this? NVMe RAID support for Threadripper is a long-awaited feature and has a lot of promise with Threadripper offering up 64 PCI-E lanes and, according to AMD, many boards offering 7 slots (6 with a graphics card) which is where AMD is getting the six drive support number. It is appears that using adapters like the Asus Hyper M.2 cards or DIMM.2 slots would allow users to go past that six drive limit though. 

NVMe RAID support on X399 / Threadripper is a feature we are in the process of testing now (see comments) and I am very interested in what the results are! Stay tuned for more information as it develops!

Also read:

Source: AMD

Grado's new PS2000e has a lot to live up to with a £2,700 pricetag

Subject: General Tech | October 2, 2017 - 03:38 PM |
Tagged: audio, Grado, PS2000e

Grado has a well deserved reputation for providing quality headphones, a reputation which may be somewhat imperilled by a £1000 ($1328USD) price increase compared to last years flagship model.  They are certainly pretty, with a smoky chrome exterior, maple reinforcing the interior and padding on the earcups that is replaceable for those looking for custom comfort.  The drivers offer the same response range of 5-50,000Hz that the PS1000e did and you an audio player or cellphone can power them, but with a 32 ohms impedance you are better off with a dedicated headphone amp.  Kitguru were very impressed with the quality, but it is up to you to decide if the price hike can be justified.

L1002692.jpg

"Unfortunately headphone prices seem to be rising in recent years and the PS2000e are no exception – they hit the UK market at a staggering £2,700 retail. Interestingly, the previous Grado PS1000e flagship is £1,700 — or £1000 less."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: Kitguru

Corsair's adjustable Glaive RGB gaming mouse

Subject: General Tech | October 2, 2017 - 02:35 PM |
Tagged: input, gaming mouse, corsair, glaive rgb, PMW3360

The Corsair Glaive RGB gaming mouse is focused on comfort, to that end they provided three different thumb rests, one smooth and slightly-curved, a textured one with a more pronounced curve and a textured, almost flat rest.  The five programmable buttons include two unique thumb buttons, much larger than other mice and set fairly high up; after some mental adjustments The Tech Report found themselves pleased with that arrangement.  The mouse uses a PixArt PMW3360 optical sensor with five customizable DPI levels, up to a maximum 16,000.  The scroll wheel was not quite up to the standard they expect from Corsair but was still acceptable, all in all TR have no problems recommending this mouse.

sideview.png

"Corsair's Glaive RGB breaks with Corsair's angular-and-aggressive mouse-shape tradition by adopting a pleasantly rounded chassis that has the potential to be a crowd-pleaser. We took the Glaive to the mat to see how it games."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

A handy list of tricks you might have forgotten you knew

Subject: General Tech | October 2, 2017 - 12:44 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, windows, apple

TechSpot posted an article compiling a variety of tips on making Windows and MacOS do what you want as well as numerous applications you can use for a variety of tasks.  The recommendations run from the classic obfuscated Windows "God Mode" folder which contains links to the majority of the tools you can use on your system to basic keyboard shortcuts.  If you are trying to figure out where all your storage space went, Space Sniffer for Windows or GrandPerspective for Macs will help you far more than random searches for large folders.  You will probably already know a great number of these tips but it is nice to have a long list compiled in a single location.

Windows_7_godmode.PNG

"Many hardcore computer users might consider themselves above learning new tricks, but there are always new ways to sharpen your skills on the PC and we bet that you will find at least one useful thing here that you didn't know before."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Techspot

Amazon Web Services Releases Lumberyard Beta 1.11

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2017 - 05:57 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, lumberyard, amazon

As we mentioned last week, Amazon has been pushing their Lumberyard fork of CryEngine into their own direction. It turns out that much of their future roadmap was actually slated for last Friday, with the release of Lumberyard 1.11.

This version replaces Crytek’s Flow Graph with Amazon’s Script Canvas visual scripting system. (Think Blueprints from Unreal Engine 4.) This lets developers design logic in a flowchart-like interface and attach it to relevant objects... building them up like blocks. Visual scripting is one area that Unity hasn’t (by default) gotten into, as they favour written scripting languages, such as C#. (Lumberyard also allows components to be written in C++ and LUA, btw.)

amazon-2017-lumberyard-111-scriptcanvas.png

It also replaces Crytek’s CryAnimation, Geppetto, and Mannequin with the EMotion FX animation system from Mystic Game Development. Interestingly, this middleware was flying under the radar recently. It was popular around the 2006-2009 timeframe with titles such as Gothic 3, Warhammer Online: Age of Reckoning, and Risen. It was also intergrated into 2010’s The Lord of the Rings: Aragorn’s Quest, and that’s about it as far as we know -- a few racing games, too. I’m curious to see how development advanced over the last ten-or-so years, unless its use is more widespread than they’re allowed to announce. Regardless, they are now in Lumberyard 1.11 as their primary animation system, so people can get their hands on it and see for themselves.

If you’re interested in developing a game in Amazon Lumberyard, this release has basically all of their forward-looking systems in place. Even though a lot of features are still experimental, and the engine is still in beta, I don’t think you have to worry about being forced to develop in a system that will be deprecated at this point.

Lumberyard is free to develop on, as long as you use Amazon Web Services for online services (or you run your own servers).

Source: Amazon