Podcast #166 - John Carmack interview, Crysis 2 DX11, Samsung SSD announcements, and more!

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2011 - 08:32 PM |
Tagged: ssd, podcast, nvidia, Intel, amd

PC Perspective Podcast #166 - 8/18/2011

This week we talk about our John Carmack interview, Crysis 2 DX11, Samsung SSD announcements, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath and Allyn Malventano

This Podcast is brought to you by MSI Computer, and their all new Sandy Bridge Motherboards!

Program length: 1:04:28

Program Schedule:

  1. 0:00:37 Introduction
  2. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  3. http://pcper.com/podcast
  4. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  5. 0:01:35 John Carmack Interview: GPU Race, Intel Graphics, Ray Tracing, Voxels and more!
  6. 0:14:43 NVIDIA Releases Q2 FY 2012 Results
  7. 0:23:17 Acer AC700-1099 Chromebook Review: Cut to the Bone
  8. 0:24:05 This Podcast is brought to you by MSI Computer, and their all new Sandy Bridge Motherboards!
  9. 0:25:20 Never mind the barrier, we even tessellated the water table !
  10. 0:31:00 SSD News
    1. Samsung Announces New High Performance SSDs for Mobile
    2. Samsung Announces New 830 SATA 3 SSDs for Consumers
    3. Intel Releasing Firmware Fix For 8MB SSD Bug In Two Weeks (correction: NOW)
    4. The Good, the bad and the ugly of SSDs
  11. 0:41:32 AMD Announces New Sub-$100 Triple Core A6-3500 APU
  12. 0:43:11 Intel ultra-balks at Ultrabook manufacturers requests
  13. 0:47:50 Sandy Bridge-E Processors: Cooler Sold Separately                                       AMD Considers Bundling FX Processors With Sealed Loop Water Coolers (LCS)
  14. 0:52:20 Bitcoin Trojan Stuff
  15. 0:55:08 Hardware / Software Pick of the Week
    1. Ryan: Tripit.com and apps
    2. Jeremy: Antikeylogger01-USB @ $49 or Brain experimentation 
    3. Josh: AMD A-3850... same price, but DiRT 3 for FREE!
    4. Allyn: Anti-pick: McAfee iOS app fail
  16. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  17. http://pcper.com/podcast   
  18. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  19. 1:03:28 Closing

HP conference call this afternoon, could a major division drop?

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Systems | August 18, 2011 - 03:55 PM |
Tagged: webOS, hp, Compaq

HP’s third fiscal quarter has entered on the last day of July and today HP will hold their conference call to announce the state of their company in the present as well as some of their plans for the future. We typically do not report on HP’s earnings as they tend to be uninteresting. This quarter is slightly different; HP has announced that they are considering spinning or selling off their PC hardware division. Along with the potential of seeing HP and Compaq computers no longer be HP one thing we do know for sure is that webOS, including Touchpads, will not be their saving grace as they are definitely dead.


At least we know they’re not betting their future in Palm.

It certainly seems a little brash for HP to all-of-a-sudden pull out of PCs altogether and I do not expect such a harsh event to occur. While it is possible that at some point HP might stretch and ultimately break ties with their PC division I do not see them just changing the locks on the doors and sending in the repo men. As for webOS it was pretty easy to see that there was not enough room in the market for them as an actual contender in the mobile space. We shall see if HP is capable of reusing their technology in another application or simply selling off webOS, potentially in pieces, to other players.

Update, Aug 18/2011 @ 6:28PM: The conference call has now ended and we have a little bit more information about the process. HP made it clear that for now PSG, the division responsible for HP and Compaq computers, tablets, and other consumer but non-printer devices, is still an operating division and will be for the forseeable future. However, over the next 12-18 months they have been authorized by the board to explore their options with spinning off or selling the division. The conference call also seemed to heavily emphasize their desire to shut down or spin off low margin divisions. To me, that sounds akin to a parent telling their misbehaving kid that someone's going to get a slap when they get home -- it is pretty clearly not the neighbors. One or two years down the road, we still may very well see HP do what IBM did with Lenovo.

In other news: WebOS' hardware division is dead and buried but they are still looking to utilize the software either internally, by licensing it to third parties, or selling it.

Source: HP

Llano is running short

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2011 - 10:43 AM |
Tagged: shortage, llano, amd

Not all is well with AMD and GLOBALFOUNDRIES 32nm process as the yields have been so low as to effect the supply of Llano chips.  Currently only two chips, the A8-3850 and A6-3650 are on the market, with three more models expected fairly soon.  Since AMD beleives that there supply difficulties will be overcome by September the shortages should not delay the release of the new lower power chips.  DigiTimes also mentioned some news about NVIDIA's 28nm products that makes the outlook for this time next year a little bleak.


"AMD's latest Llano-based processors are currently suffering from shortages due to the weaker-than-expected yield rates of the related 32nm process; however, AMD has already notified its partners that the shortage should be resolved by early September, according to sources from motherboard makers.

Due to the new platform's strong performance/price ratio, market demand for Llano APUs is rising gradually with sales of the compatible A75-based motherboards also expected to increase, the sources noted. However, because the supply of Llano APUs in July started turn tight because of weak 32nm yields, AMD currently has a lot of orders from the retail channel, but is unable to fulfill the shipments.

With AMD set to resolve its APU shortages in early September, many motherboard makers are already starting to increase their A75-based motherboard shipments.

In addition to the existing Llano CPUs, A8-3850 and A6-3650, AMD will launch three more 65W APUs, A8-3800, A6-3600 and A6-3500 at the end of the third quarter.

In additional news, although AMD, Nvidia and Qualcomm's 28nm chips finished tape-outs in June, and the companies are all ready to place orders in the second half, as demand from the retail channel remains weak, it is likely that the players will delay their orders to a later time, the sources added."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Notch uses the Quake scroll. The Earth moves.

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | August 18, 2011 - 02:55 AM |
Tagged: Mojang, bethesda

So the next game for the Minecraft creators is called Scrolls or at least it was before Bethesda threatened to sue Mojang because the name is too close to their franchise’s name, “The Elder Scrolls”. While I would personally find a lawsuit from Blizzard more justified for the name Minecraft than Bethesda’s claim: even that would seem somewhat ludicrous. After some attempt at coming to some middle-ground on behalf of Notch, they finally laid down the gauntlet and requested to settle this intellectual property dispute in Zenimax’s court; Notch challenged Bethesda to a 3-on-3 deathmatch in their own Quake 3.


Fight to the deathmatch… what a good iDea

(characters from Bethesda and Mojang)

While ultimately intellectual property should not be such a hard-fought battle since its purpose is to foster creativity rather than stifle it, this certainly does have good publicity potential. I hope that regardless of this glove-slap’s outcome that Bethesda comes to its senses and realizes that they cannot own that breadth of the trademark and lets Mojang innovate in their indie corner. Failing that, BFG.

Source: Notch's Blog

Bumpday 8/17/2011: Is your DOS shelling out some coin?

Subject: Editorial, General Tech | August 18, 2011 - 12:26 AM |
Tagged: bumpday

We just recently saw Tim write up a piece on a Trojan designed to force your computer to mine for Bitcoins and deliver the results to an attacker or someone the attacker wishes to receive the currency. The virus currently affects versions of Windows from 98 straight up through Windows 7 and shows just another way that viruses are being used to make money. That was not always the case -- at one point viruses were almost always about making you aggravated in some way shape or form, at least until people figured out how to make money from someone else’s computer.


Mined the intrusion? Just a bits.

So back in 2000, back before the forums could remember your username, what antivirus software should you use? Personally I didn’t use any as I figured the occasional reinstall of Windows was enough if I got nailed by a virus. For the others who used Antivirus software, which did they choose? PC-Cillin 98 was the choice of a K7M motherboard owner because the K7M motherboard chose it. Norton and McAfee were still around back then though Grisoft, later AVG, made its niche as the free antivirus back then as well. F-Secure got a nod for picking up something that both McAfee and Norton couldn’t. Eventually the thread slipped on some Black Ice and started talking about Firewalls which are now mostly irrelevant due to routers.


Source: PCPer Forums

New Trojan.Badminer Malware Steals Your Spare Processing Cycles To Make Criminals Money At Your Expense

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2011 - 11:02 PM |
Tagged: trojan, opencl, mining, Malware, gpgpu, bitcoin

A new piece of malware was recently uncovered by anti-virus provider Symantec that seeks to profit from your spare computing cycles. Dubbed Trojan.Badminer, this insidious piece of code is a trojan that (so far) is capable of affecting Windows operating systems from Windows 98 to Windows 7. Once this trojan has been downloaded and executed (usually through an online attack vector via an unpatched bug in flash or java), it proceeds to create a number of files and registry entries.


It's a trojan infected bitcoin, oh the audacity of malware authors!

After it has propagated throughout the system, it is then able to run one of two mining programs. It will first search for a compatible graphics card, and run Phoenix Miner. However, if a graphics card is not found, it will fall back to RPC miner and instead steal your CPU cycles.  The miners then start hashing in search of bitcoin blocks, and if found, will then send the reward money to the attacker’s account.

It should be noted that bitcoin mining itself is not inherently bad, and many people run it legitimately. In fact, if you are interested in learning more about bitcoins, we ran an article on them recently. This trojan on the other hand is malicious because it is infecting the user’s computer with unwanted code that steals processing cycles from the GPU and CPU to make the attacker money. All these GPU and CPU cycles come at the cost of reduced system responsiveness and electricity, which can add up to a rather large bill, depending on where you live and what hardware the trojan is able to get its hands on.

Right now, Symantec is offering up general tips on keeping users’ computers free from the infection, including enabling a software firewall (or at least being behind a router with its own firewall that blocks unsolicited incoming connections), running the computer as the lowest level user possible with UAC turned on, and not clicking on unsolicited email attachments or links.

If you are also a bitcoin miner, you may want to further protect yourself by securing your bitcoin wallet in the event that you also accidentally become infected by a trojan that seeks to steal the wallet.dat file (the file that essentially holds all your bitcoin currency).

Stay vigilant folks, and keep an eye out on your system GPU and CPU utilization in addion to using safer computing habits to keep nastly malware like this off of your system.  On a more opinionated note, is it just me or have malware authors really hit a new low with this one?

Source: Symantec

Everything in your notebook is power saving, why not your wireless mouse?

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2011 - 05:40 PM |
Tagged: wireless mouse, low power, apace

The Apacer Blue Engine Mouse M721 will not impress gamers looking for huge DPI ratings.  What separates it from the rat pack are three power saving modes which allow Real World Labs to use the mouse and its two AAA batteries over 4 days of fairly heavy usage without draining it.  As well, it utilizes Bluetooth so you do not have to worry about lines of sight while you are using, especially handy as the mouse wil function on any surface.  Just don't sit at a table with the laptop on top while using the mouse on your jeans below the table ... it will look bad.


"The latest Blue Engine Mouse M721 by Apacer may not dazzle you with its speed and features but its blue engine tracking sensor and three power saving modes are more than sufficient enough to give it an edge over similar wireless solutions."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Never mind the barrier, we even tessellated the water table!

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2011 - 02:56 PM |
Tagged: crysis 2, dx11, tessellation

The Tech Report took an indepth look at the "Enhanced, bionic Jersey barrier in DirectX 11" recently.  The original Crysis is still famous for its ability to crush even the best GPUs that were available when it was originally released and its continued ability to do so at very high resolutions.  Now that Crysis 2 has power slid out of it's console roots and we PC gamers received not only support for DX11 but also a high resolution texture patch which helped the game with its visual impact, it seemed worthwhile to investigate the actual changes to the process used to draw images in Crysis 2.  That lead to the discovery of not only the world's most detailed concrete barriers but also the realization that whether you can see it or not, water is being rendered in painstaking detail.


A hydrologist's dream

"When we fired up Crysis 2 in its DirectX 11 "ultra" quality mode, we saw that some obvious peaks were related to the creation of tessellated objects. Not only could we see the hull shaders used in the first stage of tessellation—proof that tessellation was in use—but we were also able to see the polygon meshes output by the tessellation process. We noticed some of the same things Damien pointed out, along with a few new ones, including one of the true wonders of this game's virtual world."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:



So you think nobody knows what you've been watching on the net?

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2011 - 02:03 PM |
Tagged: security, fud, tracking cookie, super cookie, ETag value

KISSmetrics is a small company which is able to track your movements across sites like Hulu and Spotify, using what some call a super cookie but more accurately is an ETag value.  That ETag value is a unique identifier stored in both a browser's cache and metadata folders which can be sent to KISSmetrics via JavaScript along with a header, so that any time you visit a site partnered with KISSmetrics they will know it is you.

Of course, very soon after the technical documentation of the trick was released to the net KISSmetrics claimed that they were completely innocent and that it was all a misunderstanding.  According to the CEO of KISSmetrics the company has never tracked anyone nor shared the information with a third party, so either the company never plans to ever make any money or he is being very specific in his definitions of what "is is".  Even better, they claim not to use ETag values at all only first party cookies.  As well, they claim support for the Do Not Track header and a "consumer-level opt-out" for their tracking as well.  That is disingenuous in that there is no sign of how to start the opt out process on their site, nor is there any clear way that they could identify you in order to let you opt out without a cookie or ETag placed on your machine in the first place.

The Do Not Track header is a good idea, but in addition you should consider browser add ins such as BetterPrivacy, NoScript and Ghostery as essential and perhaps even get used to running Chrome in Incognito mode, if you do not want to be trapped.  Don't use them to disable the ads which fund your favourite websites, they should be used to identify and possible block violations to your privacy only.  You can follow the link at The Register if you would like to see the technical research that has lead to these questions about KISSmetrics.


"A privacy researcher has revealed the evil genius behind a for-profit web analytics service capable of following users across more than 500 sites, even when all cookie storage was disabled and sites were viewed using a browser's privacy mode."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Intel ultra-balks at Ultrabook manufacturers requests

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2011 - 12:00 PM |
Tagged: ultrabook, Intel

There has been a bit of talk on the PC Perspective front page about Intel's new Ultrabook form factor and if it can profit Intel to release in a market that already has Apple firmly embedded in the minds of consumers as the "thin" guys.  First were the complaints from manufacturers that the bill of costs for an ultrabook was in the neighbourhood of $1000, which would put the price of sale above the competitions.  Intel then responded with a claim that the 11" and 13" ultrabooks with a thickness of 18mm will be between $493 to $710 to manufacture and the larger 14" to 17: inches, 21mm thick models will run between $475 and $650.

That price disparity seemed a little odd, as there was no explanation from Intel about where the manufacturers got their maths wrong nor an announcement of price drops from Intel to make up the difference.  What we did see was a promise by Intel to provide $300 million in funding to those who develop technologies to further the ultrabook form factor, which might help offset some of the costs of manufacturing but certainly not enough to reduce the bill of sales by a third or more.

Now the waters are even further muddied as we hear today from Digitimes that Intel is refusing a request by manufacturers to cut the price of the CPU models which will be found in ultrabooks by half.  Instead Intel is willing to drop the price by 20%, along with some marketing subsidies which will help once the product makes it to market but which will not lower the cost of the bill of materials at all.  That is not going to help make the ultrabook a good investment for the first-tier manufacturers to develop.  Add to that concern the fact that Intel's coming ultraportable Oak Trail platform, with paired Atom Z670 CPUs costs almost four times as much to produce as a Tegra 2 machine, even the discount that Intel refused is not going to make them attractive to sell.


"Intel's Oak Trail platform, paired Atom Z670 CPU (US$75) with SM35 chipsets (US$20) for tablet PC machine, is priced at US$95, already accounting for about 40% of the total cost of a tablet PC, even with a 70-80% discount, the platform is still far less attractive than Nvidia's Tegra 2 at around US$20. Although players such as Asustek Computer and Acer have launched models with the platform for the enterprise market, their machines' high price still significantly limit their sales, the sources noted.

As for Ultrabook CPUs, Intel is only willing to provide marketing subsides and 20% discount to the first-tier players, reducing the Core i7-2677 to US$317, Core i7-2637 to US$289 and Core i5-2557 to US$250.

As for Intel's insistence, the sources believe that Intel is concerned that once it agrees to reduce the price, the company may have difficulties to maintain gross margins in the 60% range and even after passing the crisis, the company may have difficulty in maintaining its pricing. Even with Intel able to maintain a high gross margin through its server platform, expecting Intel to drop CPU prices may be difficult to achieve, the sources added."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: DigiTimes

Mozilla Removing Version Numbers from Firefox's About Page

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2011 - 05:05 AM |
Tagged: software, mozilla, firefox, browser

A new bug report on Mozilla's Bugzilla website indicates that the versioning of the popular web browser will be hidden from the users in future builds.  Specifically, bug 678775 was posted late last week by Asa Dotzler, and addresses the version number on Firefox's About page.  The bug report recommends removing the specific version number in favor of a more general phrase such as "Firefox checked for updates 20 minutes ago, you are running the latest release," according to Asa.  Firefox would then, ideally, check for an update whenever the About window was opened, to keep the update message current and the user running the latest build.


The current Firefox About page where version numbers are still listed.

While the specific version number will be removed from the About page, users would still be able to dig into the browser's less well known areas, such as the about:support configuration page, to see it.

On one hand, Firefox's new rapid-release schedule will make versioning a less efficient method of, well, versioning; however, the About page of an application has traditionally been the spot to find the version number, and removing the version number from what is essentially a version number information page seems counter productive.  Firefox will likely be on version 7 before the end of the year, and considering version 5 was just released in June, the argument that version numbers are getting out of hand has some merit.  With that said, a simplified message to users that they are, in fact, running the latest version is a good thing to implement, but does it necessitate no longer displaying the version number?

Personally, I enjoy knowing the specific version number of the applications I run, but I'm curious what you guys think; should the version number be buried?

Source: Mozilla

"I look forward to welcoming Motorolans to our family of Googlers"

Subject: General Tech | August 15, 2011 - 01:26 PM |
Tagged: purchase, motorola, google

The tech world is always going through changes; much like life in a pond, the small things either grow into big things or something big eats them.  Motorola was once a big fish, but went through some lean times, losing about $4 billion from 2007 to 2009. They started off more than 50 years ago, designing chips for radios and TVs and even providing communication chips to NASA for many missions including the first moon landing.  From there they sold off the TV portion to a little known company called Panasonic, so that they could focus on their communications chips and to start dabbling in what became the 6800 and 68000 series of chips.  Those chips powered Amigas, the original Apple MacIntoshes; even the joint IBM and Apple PowerPC chips were Motorola and that architecture is still used today.

As of today that once big fish is now a part of Google, as they purchased it at a premium of 63% above market value.  That is certainly a decent deal for stockholders and may well be a great deal for Motorola employees as well as they move to a strictly Android based development regime. That may lead to some interesting times in the future, as Google claims that Android will remain open and run on any architecture.  However, now that they own a complete closed development chain, in the form of Motorola's patents and hardware, the open philosophy may run counter to the development of hardware.  John McCarthy of Forrester Blogs, as well as many others are following this story; though it will be quite a while before we know the full repercussions of the purchase.


"Earlier this morning, Google announced its intention to buy Motorola Mobility for 12.5 Billion in cash or $40/share. There are three broad justifications for the deal:

  • Access to the Motorola patent portfolio which it could then license to partners like HTC and Samsung to protect against the long arm of Apple's lawyers.
  • An integrated hardware/software play to compete with Apple. The problem with this logic is that the deal does not address the fragmentation on the Android platform which is the bigger issue.
  • The set-top business to bolster its lagging Google TV offering."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

SteelSeries' Sensei Gets Smart With 32-bit ARM Processor

Subject: General Tech | August 15, 2011 - 07:25 AM |
Tagged: steelseries, Sensei, gaming mouse, cpu, arm

Bit-Tech reports that popular gaming peripheral maker SteelSeries will be unveiling a new mouse at GamesCon next week. The new gaming mouse, dubbed the Sensei is a dark, ambidextrous affair with LED powered logo, wheel, and sensitivity indicator in addition to an LCD screen on the bottom of the mouse to configure features.

The Sensei mouse has a large SteelSeries logo towards the back of the palm rest. The lighting of the logo supports up to 16.8 million colors. The body is comprised of metal with a non-slip grip coating, and features eight buttons. Bruce Hawver, SteelSeries’ CEO stated “The Sensei is really the culmination of thousands of hours of research and testing with competitive players.”  In keeping with the competitive gamer theme, SteelSeries has endowed the Sensei with advanced macro capabilities, including the ability to record timed and layered macros with keystrokes.


On the sensor front, the Sensei features a sensitivity range of 1 to 5,700 counts per inch (SteelSeries’ DPI-like system of measurement). Further, thanks to a “Double CPI” feature, the gaming mouse is able to ratchet up the sensitivity to an impressive 11,400 CPI, which makes navigating a six screen Eyefinity setup a breeze. Using SteelSeries ExactTech tracking customization technologies (ExactSens, ExactAccel, and ExactAim), Sensei’s laser sensor features a 10.8 megapixel image correlation at up to 12,000 frames per second (FPS), enabling it to track movements up to 150 inches per second.

All this tracking, macro support, and laser sensor horsepower demands a relatively beefy processor. While these instructions could be passed to the CPU for processing, having a dedicated chip on the mouse to process the sensor data and pass the coordinate data to the system can lower lag (or at least that’s SteelSeries’ goal). That requirement for computing time is where the 32-bit ARM processor comes into play. Specifically, the company states that the processor enables advanced SteelSeries ExactTech calculations to be done on the mouse itself and configuration via the mouse’s LCD screen.


The Sensei is slated for launch in September with a price of $90. The numbers and hardware are certainly impressive; however, whether that hardware will make a noticeable improvement in gaming and daily usage over the competition remains to be seen.  More photos and information on the new Sensei gaming mouse can be found here.

What do you think about the Sensei’s inclusion of ARM processor and LCD screen? Personally, while I am rather partial to (blue) LEDs, I can’t see myself using the LCD screen or other gamer-oriented features.

Source: Bit-Tech

Counter-Strike: Global Offensive, coming before HL2 Episode 3

Subject: General Tech | August 13, 2011 - 12:01 AM |
Tagged: valve, Counter-Strike

There exists a videogame software company up in Washington State known as Valve Corporation. There also exists a company from Washington State that produces steamy forum trolls and 4chan memes. The two companies are often times (VST) the same company; today is no different. Valve unleashed a Global Offensive when they announced a new upcoming continuation to their longstanding franchise that is not Half Life 2: Episode 3. The game will be a continuation of their long-standing modern-era franchise and will be titled, Counter-Strike: Global Offensive.


Fans wonder if Valve actually thinks that they already released Episode 3.

(Update Aug 13th 2011 @ 4am: Replaced image to clarify joke 1am: They didn't announce Episode 3 yet... this is just yet another thing they announced before they announce it.)

Global Offensive is set to launch in Early 2012 which should always be taken with a grain of salt when it comes to Valve, Episode 3, but this time-frame looks about legitimate. The game will be available on Xbox Live Arcade, the Playstation Network, and Steam for PC and Mac. Judging by their target distribution model on the consoles it appears as if the release will not in fact be a full-fledged standalone game which makes sense due to Valve’s historical stance on how much content should be provided per dollar; there is even a joke that circulated briefly after the release of the Orange Box that Valve needs to round out the bottom of their second v. Valve promises that the game will contain both new and updated content with de_dust explicitly named as being in Global Offensive. No word on hats.

Source: Steam

Happy 30th birthday IBM PC 5150!

Subject: General Tech | August 12, 2011 - 05:18 PM |
Tagged: killer frogs, friday, folding frogs

Computer maintenance can be a long and tedious process, trying to find rogue processes, old and useless registry entries or cleaning out temp files takes time to do manually or with the tools provided within Windows.  That is part of the reason that programs that automate cleaning are so popular, though some are almost ransome-ware so be careful which ones you choose.  The same goes when you are trying out new anti-virus programs as well.  For extra bonus points you can bring network and hardware maintenance into the mix as well, from replacing elderly protocols to replacing elderly hardware, there are lots of problems to fill your spare time.  Even keeping track of your vendors can absorb hours. Check out the Microsoft Forum for more issues ... as well as solutions, of course.

If you'd rather have a bit of fun instead of working, the Gaming Forum's Fragging Frogs are available on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday to help you out with that.  The Lightning Round is available for those who prefer their smackdowns to be delivered with words than with bullets.  If you are more altruistic, donate your CPU cycles to a BOINC project or to Folding@Home, or even join in the 24 hour a day swap meet that is the Trading Post.

You have probably noticed a lot of content on the front page covering Quakecon and the interview that Ryan did with John Carmack, so you are right in assuming that the PC Perspective Podcast spends a goodly amount of time on the same topic ... and others.


Dr. Dre is shilling for Monster Cable

Subject: General Tech | August 12, 2011 - 03:45 PM |
Tagged: audio, monster cable

The Beats by Dr. Dre Studio Headphones are made by everyone's favourite overpriced cable vendor, Monster Cable, helping to explain the $300 price tag ($350 direct from Monster Cable).  [H]ard|OCP nevertheless forged ahead with reviewing them, hoping that perhaps this time Monster Cable produced something worth the price of admission.  They compared them to similarly priced headsets from Beyer-Dynamic, which outclassed the Beats Headphones in every metric, as did the studio quality Audio-Technica M50 they tried.  Their final verdict is not kind.


"Few brands of headphones have achieved popularity and consumer adoption as quickly as Monster's Beats by Dre series. We recently purchased our own pair of the Beats' Studio Edition headphones to tell you if these are merely marketing fluff or the "real deal.""

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: [H]ard|OCP

More from Black Hat 2011; Facial Recognition Book

Subject: General Tech | August 12, 2011 - 01:22 PM |
Tagged: facebook, black hat 2011

A presenter at Black Hat 2011 put forward their research on using Facebook as a facial recognition database.  Not only do people upload a lot of pictures of themselves and their friends, they also tag them with the names of the people in the pictures.  This means that there is a large sample of data to be used, with the same face available from multiple angles, lighting conditions and backgrounds.  The findings; nearly perfect recognition and re-identification of people in the database with a photo taken from a smartphone in under 3 seconds. Thank Techware Labs for the chill that just headed down your spine.


"Every month Facebook users upload 2.5 Billion photos. With each upload users may identify and tag not only themselves, but everyone in the photo. What if we could use this massive attendance sheet of the world in a larger way. Say with facial recognition and location information? Today Alessandro Acquisti presented his research and attempts at doing just that."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

USB 3.0 Will Deliver 100 Watts Of Power In 2012

Subject: General Tech | August 11, 2011 - 08:15 PM |
Tagged: usb 3.0, external drive

USB 2.0 brought us 480Mb/s transfer speeds and 2.5 watts of power over the cable. This required either a second USB cable for additional power or a plug in power adapter. Either way, it was a hassle to power even moderately speedy external hard drives.

USB 3.0 brought a massive speed increase to 5Gb/s transfer speeds; however, power only received a relatively small bump to 4.5 watts of power over the cable (900mA at 5V). While the bump in power can now more easily power most external hard drives, power hungry high speed mechanical and solid state hard drives that are able to fully take advantage of the speed increases of USB 3.0 will still require additional power.


A USB powered flux capacitor.

In an interesting move by the USB 3.0 Promoters Group, a new USB 3 specification will provide up to 100 watts of power at varying voltages to external devices. This great increase in power would allow users to power external USB monitors without a separate power adapter, RAID enclosures, desk lamps, USB grills (okay, maybe not), and other multiple hard drive external enclosures like the Drobo boxes.

While the new specification is due out next year (2012), it will be some time before hardware (specifically power supplies) catches up to the specification’s maximum power draw. Do you think the move to deliver more power through the USB 3 cable is a good one, or will the increased complexity of delivering 100 watts over the same cable delivering data outweigh the convenience of only needing a single cable?

Source: Ars Technica

Podcast #165 - QuakeCon 2011, MSI's GTX580 Lightning, Intel 710 SSDs, Ultrabooks and more!

Subject: General Tech | August 11, 2011 - 02:27 PM |
Tagged: podcast, pcper, nvidia, msi, Intel, GTX580, amd

PC Perspective Podcast #165 - 8/11/2011

This week we talk about QuakeCon 2011, MSI's GTX580 Lightning, Intel 710 SSDs, Ultrabooks and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath and Allyn Malventano

This Podcast is brought to you by MSI Computer, and their all new Sandy Bridge Motherboards!

Program length: 1:25:12

Program Schedule:

  1. 0:00:27 Introduction
  2. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  3. http://pcper.com/podcast
  4. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  5. 0:02:02 Quakecon 2011 and our Workshop - Postmortem
    1. Day 1 Coverage
    2. Day 2 Coverage
    3. Day 3 Coverage
  6. 0:18:05 This Podcast is brought to you by MSI Computer, and their all new Sandy Bridge Motherboards!
  7. 0:18:54 MSI N580GTX Lightning Xtreme Edition Review: What a GTX 580 Should Be
  8. 0:30:18 Antec High Current Gamer HCG-750 PSU Review
  9. 0:31:30 Samsung Galaxy Tab 10.1 Review - The Best Android Tablet?
  10. 0:32:16 Just Delivered Exclusive: PNY XLR8 Liquid Cooled GTX 580 Combo
    1. ZOTAC Unveils Water-Cooling Solutions
  11. 0:36:40 Let us do some math, shall we? The cost of consoles
  12. 0:41:46 Intel 710 SSD Prices Leaked
  13. 0:47:40 ExpressCard trying to pull a (not so) fast one?
  14. 0:55:30 NVIDIA Outlines Multi-GPU and Cloud Graphics With Project Maximus and Virtual Graphics Technologies
  15. 1:06:50 Will Intel's Ultrabook form factor come with an integral Achilles Heel?
    1. Intel bets $300m on their Ultrabook-ie. Next step: broken legs.
  16. 1:09:15 Hardware / Software Pick of the Week
    1. Ryan: Blackmagic Intensity card 
    2. Jeremy: Strangely, I find myself thinking kindly upon BigFoot Networks
    3. Josh: http://www.faststone.org/FSResizerDetail.htm
    4. Allyn: http://pastebin.com and Ghostery
  17. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  18. http://pcper.com/podcast   
  19. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  20. 1:23:50 Closing

Eculideon's unlimited fiddly bits

Subject: General Tech | August 11, 2011 - 11:34 AM |
Tagged: infinite graphics, euclideon, particle cloud

If you have yet to stumble upon the YouTube video which began the debate, you should book 10 minutes to sit and watch the demonstration and explanation to make sure you understand what Euclideon's unlimited graphics are about.   The Aussie company Euclideon have developed a way to translate polygon based 3D objects, the most common method used in games since sprites, into a cloud of particles which define the volume and surface of the object.  They currently claim 64 'atoms' per mm3, which has a very significant impact on the quality of the rendered object.  Previous to their project, these point clouds were only used for medical imaging and other professional applications due to the serious hardware requirements to render more than just a handful of objects.  Euclideon seems to have managed a way to sidestep the hardware problems and have made it possible for point clouds to be rendered without needing a Fermi farm in your house.  Even better they claim they have working translation software which can take objects created in common polygon based 3D design programs like Maya and transform them into point cloud objects.

If you think this sounds too good to be true, you are not alone in your doubt.  Before make the horrible mistake of using the YouTube comments to inform your decision, head to [H]ard|OCP.  They have posted an interview they conducted with Euclideon on their new rendering software, which will teach you a lot more than the semi-coherent statements under the YouTube video.  It is almost a full hour long, so get comfortable before you start.


"Euclideon has come under fire for its Unlimited Detail Technology claims once again. Instead of sitting around discussing it among ourselves, we sent John Gatt to Brisbane, Australia to talk to the man himself with Euclideon, Bruce Dell. We show you the demo running in real time with hardware specs and answer a lot of questions, all in video."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: [H]ard|OCP