Computex 2018: AMD and Cooler Master Unveil Wraith Ripper Air Cooler For Threadripper Processors

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 8, 2018 - 11:39 AM |
Tagged: cooler master, amd, Threadripper, threadripper 2, Zen+, computex, computex 2018, tr4

In an interview with AMD Senior Vice President Jim Anderson, PC World's Gordon Mah Ung got the chance to discuss and get hands on with second generation Threadripper as well as AMD's new Wraith Ripper air cooler. Developed in partnership with Cooler Master, the Wraith Ripper is a massive air cooler capable of keeping even the upcoming 32 core Threadripper processor cool (allegedly a 250W TDP part!) which, as Jim Anderson notes, has all four dies on the package being used (first generation Threadripper used two hot dies and two spacers).

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The behemoth features a full cover block for Threadripper that connects to a very dense aluminum fin stack using 14 nickel plated copper heatpipes. There is a single fan in the center of the fin stack hiding under a black fan shroud that covers the top and left and right sides. The black shroud also holds the customizable RGB lighting which lights up the logo and outline around the edges of the shroud. The fan is allegedly rated at 39 dBa which is pretty good considering the amount of heat it needs to dissipate from Threadripper CPUs. Likely due to the HSF's sheer size Cooler Master was able to go with a larger and slower spinning fan.

Other details like weight, cost, and release date are still unknown though it does appear to have some heft to it! It should be available later this year following the Q3 launch of second generation Threadripper though it will work fine with first generation Threadripper processors as well as they use the same TR4 socket.

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June 8, 2018 | 12:46 PM - Posted by James

So those pipes actually terminate in the cooler instead of going through and out the other side like most coolers. I guess that is kind of 3 pipes for each die plus 2 extra in the middle. At 250 W, that is only 62.5 W per die. This will look somewhat like 4 isolated systems that put out that 62.5 Watts with a 3 pipe cooler. 250 W isnt really that much; we have had video cards that produce more than that for a long time. It is less of a problem for a GPU due to the die size generally being much larger than a cpu. This isn't particularly dense though. The power per die is relatively small. I had wondered if they would be able to hit some higher boost clocks. It seems like they could boost a single core up very high in that power envelope.

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