RAM timings versus frequency on an X470 system

Subject: Memory | September 17, 2018 - 02:49 PM |
Tagged: T-Force VULCAN TUF, G.SKILL Flare X, ddr4-3200, AM4, amd, overclocking, x470

AMD processors like fast RAM, but [H]ard|OCP wanted to see if sacrificing timings for higher frequencies is the answer in all cases, or only some.  To test this out they grabbed two 16GB kits of DDR4-3200, one T-Force Vulcan TUF and one G.SKILL Flare X.  The Vulcan's base timings are 16-18-18-38 while the G.SKILL offer 14-14-14-34, both running at 1.35v.  Take a look to see how these kits performed at their base settings as well as their top overclocks in the full review.

1534833785v8t155a187_1_2_l.jpg

"We take a look at some of the new RAM available for the AMD Ryzen AM4 platform and see how well these work out when it comes to overclockability and timing tweaking. On the test bench today are the Team T-FORCE VULCAN TUF Gaming Alliance and G.SKILL Flare X Series RAM, both rated at 3200MHz."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

AMD Releases B450 Chipset for Ryzen

Subject: Chipsets | July 31, 2018 - 11:50 PM |
Tagged: amd, ryzen, b450, x470, x370, b350, a320, Intel, motherboards

Today AMD is launching their latest chipset product supporting Ryzen CPUs and APUs. When Ryzen was launched we had a pretty robust selection of boards based on the A320, B350, and X370 chipsets. These products brought AMD to the present in terms of capabilities and modern features across the board. AMD no longer bifurcated their sockets and chipsets in regards to AM3+ and FM2+, but instead focused all products on the new AM4 socket. AMD plans to support this socket til at least 2020, and most AM4 boards should be able to handle upcoming CPUs with a BIOS update.

intro.PNG

The release of the new Ryzen 2000 parts brought in the new X470 chipset which provided some extra features as compared to the X370. Most of the I/O was the same but it brought in support for Precision Boost 2 as well as the free StoreMI storage functionality. For the enthusiast looking on the AMD side, the X470 is the no-brainer especially if they want to run multiple graphics cards. This is not the best overall option if the enthusiast is looking for single GPU usage as well as a much lower price.

lineup.PNG

AMD is presenting the new B450 chipset that looks to fill the gap that the new X470 leaves. It is a partial redesign of the B350 and it provides a couple of extra features. Most interesting is that the chip actually runs about 2 watts lower in power than the B350 did at idle. The B450 joins the X470/370 in having StoreMI support as well, which the B350 does not offer. Unlike the X470, the B450 parts do not allow the bifurcation of the CPU’s PCI-Ex16. Without utilizing the 6 PCI-E lanes off the southbridge the B450 will not support multi-GPU off of the CPU PCI-E controller. Motherboard manufacturers may in fact use a x4 electrical connection in a x16 slot to utilize CrossFire, but AMD did not necessarily intend that to be a standard feature.

connectivity.PNG

One area that AMD does focus on is giving users the ability to overclock any CPU they have. While AMD has the “x” designation after certain SKUs, they are not the only ones that can be overclocked (unlike Intel and their non-K variants). Even though AMD may specify that a CPU can only go up to a max of 2933 speeds, it is easy to get those memory targets well above that. 3200 is very common for these parts and should almost be the specification for the Ryzen 2000 series.

cost.PNG

The aforementioned StoreMI gets included with the B450 support, as compared to it not supported on the previous B350. I doubt there is anything hardware related not allowing StoreMI to run on the older SB350, but AMD is working on the whole product segmentation thing.  Throwing in some free software now and then can be seen as a solid value added feature. StoreMI has significant performance benefits for users who rely on smaller SSDs for the OS. Applications are intelligently managed so that they act like they are installed on the SSD only.

cost_02.PNG

Most of the boards will be under $120 with a sweet spot around $70. Features of course will vary from board to board and that will affect the price. The overall functionality of the boards should be about the same though. Plenty of SATA ports, one NVME, USB 3.0/3.1/Gen1/Gen2, and the six PCI-E lanes which can have multiple uses. At launch there are around 25 boards already available from the major manufacturers.

overclocking.PNG

The B450 is aimed to be a cost effective, yet feature rich motherboard that further accentuates the price advantage that AMD holds over Intel in terms of performance and core counts. When combined with lower priced yet comparable boards from Intel, AMD feels their value proposition is further accentuated. This product helps flesh out the chipset and motherboard offerings for the AM4 ecosystem. AMD continues to be aggressive in grabbing more marketshare and selling competitive products across the board.

selection.PNG

Source: AMD

Ryzen 2 has a new home in the ROG STRIX X470-I

Subject: General Tech | July 30, 2018 - 03:17 PM |
Tagged: asus, ROG STRIX X470-I, x470, mini-itx

There really isn't a lot of space on a mini-ITX board, which did not stop ASUS from fitting quite a bit onto this new X470 motherboard.  Indeed the only real sacrifices are the single 16x PCIe 3.0 slot and that there is only a pair of DIMM slots.  Other than that there are a pair of M.2 ports, four SATA ports and 10 USB ports of varying description including two second generation USB 3.1 ports.  [H]ard|OCP were impressed with the quality of the build, the overclocking and the general performance of the board, check out the full review here.

1532425385gp2fo6vnmt_1_9_l.jpg

"ASUS has another mini-ITX powerhouse on its hands, and this time its for AMD’s 2nd Generation Ryzen processors. The ASUS ROG STRIX X470-I Gaming promises a lot, and frankly we expect a lot from these motherboards. ASUS practically set the standard for enthusiast class mini-ITX motherboards and it has set the bar very high in the past."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

ASRock's X470 Taichi Ultimate power up and test

Subject: Motherboards | July 4, 2018 - 05:22 PM |
Tagged: asrock, X470 Taichi Ultimate, x470, amd, ryzen 2

The new generation of AMD boards feature some interesting aesthetic choices, such you can see on ASRock's X470 Taichi Ultimate.  The black and grey theme is contrasted by the RGBs you already knew were present, but it is worth noting that TechPowerUp considered the implementation of the blinken lighten as exceptional.  Sadly the same could not be said of the audio chipset on the board, which they found lacklustre for a flagship model.  Their overclocking tests showed no deficiencies, the boards ability was met or exceeded the other X470 boards they have tried.

As it is a flagship motherboard, there are quite a few features to cover in the review, which you can find here.

bdf.jpg

"In addition to the new features brought to the X470 chipset, the Taichi Ultimate offers additional SATA ports, 10 gigabit Ethernet, and superior control in overclocking using the Hyper BCLK Engine II, just to name a few. ASRock's Taichi line of motherboards have traditionally been top performers. Can the ASRock X470 Taichi Ultimate and X470 chipset match up?"

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

 

Source: TechPowerUp

He's a VII time Crosshair Hero!

Subject: Motherboards | June 8, 2018 - 04:36 PM |
Tagged: asus, x470, amd, ryzen, crosshair vii hero, AM4

Even after years of suggestions and beratement, CMOS battery placement remains a sore spot for a variety of reveiwers.  The Crosshair VII Hero is no exception, where the battery will be buried under you GPU; what is exceptional is that this is the sole shortcoming to this AM4 board.  [H]ard|OCP were duly impressed by the features and performance of this board, as well as the price tag, which is nicely under $300.   Whether you plan on taking advantage of Precision Boost 2 or manually overclocking, this is a board worth checking out.

1528094429r2hh318kuv_1_9_l.jpg

"Along with the second generation AMD Ryzen CPUs, we are getting the new and somewhat improved X470 chipset motherboards. We have been beating on the Crosshair VII Hero for about a month now and have figured out what we like about, outside of it being an excellent overclocker for the Ryzen 7 CPUs."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Revisting Asus's ROG Crosshair VII Hero WiFi motherboard

Subject: Motherboards | May 18, 2018 - 04:39 PM |
Tagged: asus, ASUS ROG, crosshair vii hero wifi, ryzen 2, amd, x470

Upon first meeting the Asus ROG Crosshair VII Hero Kitguru were impressed with the features and design of the board but underwhelmed by the performance.  After contacting ASUS they received a new BIOS and resumed testing, publishing their results here.   The board now performs admirably on the default settings, at the cost of an extra ~40W of power being consumed, while when manually clocked you can replicate the performance but without that extra power draw.

Kitguru explains how Synchronous and Asynchronous mode differ and how this relates to the extra power draw.  In Synchronous mode the CPU memory and PCIe all share the same clock signal while in Asynchronous mode the CPU clock can be adjusted without any effect on the memory or PCIe clocks.  Check out what they think this means for Ryzen users here.

Asus-ROG-Crosshair-VII-Hero-Wi-Fi-Motherboard-Review-on-KitGuru-End-Two-Elevation.jpg

"As we expected, the Crosshair VII Hero is a high end motherboard that is loaded with overclocking features and while it looks and feels really solid, our initial testing suggested that performance was nothing special."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: Kitguru

Round up, Round up; X470 time has come!

Subject: Motherboards | May 9, 2018 - 02:41 PM |
Tagged: x470, amd, ryzen, Pinnacle Ridge

Techspot have revealed what their favourite X470 motherboards are and a brief overview of why they chose it over other available models, except for Micro-ATX seeing as how they are as rare as hen's teeth. The prices range fom $130 to $300 and do include Mini-ITX as there are several models available.  Take a look at their reasoning and follow up by reading fll reviews to see if the board is really for you.

Capture.PNG

"There's already loads of great AMD X470 motherboards to choose from starting as low as $130. Asus, Asrock, MSI and Gigabyte have all done a great job with their boards and to be completely honest, for the most part you can't go wrong."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: TechSpot

Hello X470, how do you do ... at benchmarks

Subject: Motherboards | April 23, 2018 - 07:58 PM |
Tagged: x470, amd, ryzen 2, msi, x470 Gaming M7 AC, Pinnacle Ridge

The reviews for AMD's new chipset are starting to appear, for instance the MSI X470 Gaming M7 AC over at Guru of 3D. The new chipset brings support for DDR4-2933 and 3200 which is worth the investment for Ryzen chips.  The board supports two full speed M.2 4x PCIe slots, with SATA trimmed down to a half dozen.  Of the eight USB ports only one is Type-C but all support 3.1 transfer speeds according to Guru of 3D.  The single LAN connection is backed up by dual WiFi antenna and there is even optical audio out for those special people who make use of it. 

Check out the overclocking results and the fine details right here.

img_0474.jpg

"We review the MSI X470 Gaming M7 AC. With the release of Ryzen 5 2600X and Ryzen 7 2700X AMD decided to add a new chipset as well, X470 offers a more fine-tuned experience for your Ryzen processor. And this MSI board, well it is just loaded with features."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: Guru of 3D

Podcast #496 - Ryzen 7 2700X, 8-Core Coffee Lake, WD Black NVMe, and more!

Subject: General Tech | April 19, 2018 - 10:08 AM |
Tagged: x470, wd black nvme, Samsung, s9 plus, ryzen, podcast, Pinnacle Ridge, Intel, coffee lake, amd, 2700x, 2600x

PC Perspective Podcast #496 - 04/19/18

Join us this week for discussion of the Ryzen 7 2700X and Ryzen 5 2600X, WD's new NVMe SSDs, performance benchmarks of the Galaxy S9 Plus and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Allyn Malventano, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath

Peanut Gallery: Ken Addison, Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:59:30

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. Thanks to Simple Contacts for supporting PC Perspective. Save $30 on your first Simple Contacts order at http://simplecontacts.com/pcper and use promo code: pcper
  3. News items of interest:
  4. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:45:05 Allyn: Myst 25th Anniversary Collection (kickstarter)
    2. 1:49:20 Jeremy: I can’t believe we’ve never picked Rufus
  5. Closing/outro
 
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: AMD
Tagged: x470, StoreMI, raid, NVMe, amd

NVMe RAID and StoreMI

With Ken testing all of the new AMD X470 goodness that we had floating around the office here at PCPer, I snuck in some quick storage testing to get a look at just how the new platform handled a typical power user NVMe RAID configuration. We will be testing a few different platform configurations:

  • ASUS Z270 w/ 7700K
    • 1x SSD behind chipset (PCH)
    • 2x SSD (RAID-0) behind chipset (PCH)
    • 1x SSD directly connected to CPU
  • AMD X470 w/ 2600X
    • 1x SSD via RAIDXpert bottom driver
    • 2x SSD (RAID-0) via RAIDXpert
    • 1x SSD via MS InBox NVMe driver

For the AMD system we tested, all M.2 ports were direct connected to the CPU. This should be the case for most systems since the AMD chipset has only a PCIe 2.0 x4 link which would cut most NVMe SSD bandwidth in half if passed through it. The difference on AMD is that installing the RAIDXpert software also installs a 'bottom driver' which replaces the Windows NVMe driver, while Intel's RST platform handles this process more in the chipset hardware (but is limited to PCIe 3.0 x4 DMI bandwidth). Now onto the results:

Random Read IOPS

random.png

For random IO, we see expected scaling from AMD, but do note that IOPS comes in ~40% lower than the same configuration on Intel's platform. This is critical as much of the IO seen in general use is random reads at lower queue depths. We'd like to see AMD doing better here, especially in the case where a single SSD was operating without the interference of the RAIDXpert driver, which was better, but still not able to match Intel.

Random Read Latency

latency.png

This latency chart should better explain the IOPS performance seen above. Note that the across the board latency increases by ~10us on the X470 platform, followed by another ~20us when switching to the RAIDXpert driver. That combined ~30us is 50% of the 60us QD1 latency seen the Z270 platform (regardless of configuration).

Sequential Read

sequential.png

Ok, now we see the AMD platform stretch its legs a bit. Since Intel NVMe RAID is bottlenecked by its DMI link while AMD has all NVMe SSDs directly connected to the CPU, AMD is able to trounce Intel on sequentials, but there is a catch. Note the solid red line, which means no RAIDXpert software. That line tracks as it should, leveling off horizontally at a maximum for that SSD. Now look at the two dashed red lines and note how they fall off at ~QD8/16. It appears the RAIDXpert driver is interfering and limiting the ultimate throughput possible. This was even the case for a single SSD passing through the RAIDXpert bottom driver (configured as a JBOD volume).

StoreMI

2018-04-19-08-49-39.png

AMD has also launched their answer to Intel RST caching. StoreMI is actually a more flexible solution that offers some unique advantages over Intel. Instead of copying a section of HDD data to the SSD cache, StoreMI combines the total available storage space of both the HDD and SSD, and is able to seamlessly shuffle the more active data blocks to the SSD. StoreMI also offers more cache capacity than Intel - up to 512 256GB SSD caches are possible (60GB limit on Intel). Lastly, the user can opt to donate 2GB of RAM as an additional caching layer.

2018-04-19-08-49-55.png

AMD claims the typical speedups that one would expect with an SSD caching a much slower HDD. We have done some testing with StoreMI and can confirm the above slide's claims. Actively used applications and games end up running at close to SSD speeds (after the first execution, which comes from the HDD). StoreMI is not yet in a final state, but that is expected within the next week or two. We will revisit that topic with hard data once we have the final shipping product on-hand.