AMD Will Sell Wraith Max CPU Cooler Separately

Subject: Memory | August 6, 2017 - 11:41 AM |
Tagged: wraith max, Wraith, ryzen, fm2, amd, AM4

Amidst all the big AMD announcements recently, the company quietly revealed that it would begin selling the Wraith Max CPU cooler separately at retail. The Wraith Max heatsink and fan was previously only available in OEM systems and in boxed SKUs of the highest end Ryzen processors (mainly the 1700X and 1800X). The cooler is a refreshed and upgraded version of the company’s original Wraith cooler that measures 105 x 105 x 85mm and features a boxy horizontal cooler with a copper baseplate and heatpipes with a shrouded 92mm fan along with a RGB LED ring around the fan that can be controlled via motherboard software.

AMD Wraith Max CPU Cooler.png

The Wraith Max is rated at 140W TDP and is connected to the system using a fan header and USB (for controlling the lighting). AMD further rates the cooler at a fairly quiet 38 dBA. The Wraith Max supports all of the usual AMD sockets including AM4, AM3, and FM2 (no Threadripper support of course heh), but there is no official support for Intel sockets.

The Wraith Max cooler will retail for $59 USD. I have been keeping an eye on the usual online retailers and have not yet seen it listed, but it should be available soon. Hopefully there will be more reviews of the cooler now that it is a retail product on its own, and maybe we can get Sebastian to take a look at it and compare it to the original Wraith cooler (and his usual lineup of course) he reviewed last year.

Source: AMD

AMD Ryzen CPUs Will Be Available With New Stock Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 22, 2017 - 01:04 AM |
Tagged: Wraith, ryzen, hsf, AMD Wraith, amd

Information recently leaked online detailing how AMD will package its retail Ryzen offerings. In addition to the usual processor-only trays for OEMs and system integrators, AMD will offer retail boxed Ryzen processors with a basic HSF (heatsink-fan), circular 95W Wraith Spire cooler, 140W Wraith Max HSF depending on the processor as well as CPU-only boxes of the X-series (e.g. Ryzen 7 1700X) processors for enthusiasts looking to choose their own air or liquid cooler.

AMD Ryzen Cooling Solutions.jpg

Image via Informtica Cero.

TechPowerUp is reporting that a basic cooler similar to AMD’s pre-Wraith style of heatsinks will be packaged with the lower end Ryzen 3 and Ryzen 5 chips – mainly the 65W models. Moving up the processor lineup, the non-X Ryzen 5 and Ryzen 7 processors (up to Ryzen 7 1700) will be bundled with a new “Wraith Spire” cooler that sports a circular design with curved aluminum fins and an (approximately) 80mm fan. This new HSF is rated at 95W and measures 109mm x 103mm x 54mm and is allegedly engineered to be a low noise cooling solution.

Stepping things up a notch, the “Wraith Max” is a tweaked FX-era Wraith cooler (horizontal boxed design with a single fan) that can handle up to 140W processors and has been designed with noise levels in mind while not sacrificing too much performance. It measures 105mm x 108mm x 85mm so it is a fair bit taller than the Wraith Spire. This cooler will come with the higher end eight core Ryzen chips such as the Ryzen 7 1700X and 1800X.

The X variants will also be available in WOF (without fan-heatsink) packages that come in retail boxes but without any heatsink. These WOF packages should come in a bit cheaper than the processor+HSF multipacks and will be ideal for users wanting to use liquid cooling or a higher end air cooler for overclocking.

Thanks to previous leaks that have revealed the box art, AMD will be clearly marking the retail packages to show which cooler is coming with which processor. Further, XFastest has posted images of the basic Ryzen (non-Wraith) heatsink, and you can see (albeit tiny) images of the Wraith Spire and Wraith Max in the leaked table (above, from Informatica Cero).

Sebastian seemed to be very impressed by the original Wraith cooler where he found it to be a significant improvement over AMD’s previous OEM designs and able to match the Hyper 212 Evo in cooling performance (though the Wraith couldn’t quite match it in noise levels due to its smaller fan). So long as AMD maintains quality control and builds on the previous Wraith’s strengths (and hopefully larger fans, at least on the Max), they should be good little coolers. I am interested to see the new Wraith coolers in detail and how well they perform. I suspect many readers will be opting for the CPU-only packages, but for those readers that just want a simple bundled cooling solution I hope the Wraith Spire and Wraith Max turn out to be good deals.

Also read:

Source: TechPowerUp

Podcast #409 - GTX 1060 Review, 3DMark Time Spy Controversy, Tiny Nintendo and more!

Subject: General Tech | July 21, 2016 - 12:21 PM |
Tagged: Wraith, Volta, video, time spy, softbank, riotoro, retroarch, podcast, nvidia, new, kaby lake, Intel, gtx 1060, geforce, asynchronous compute, async compute, arm, apollo lake, amd, 3dmark, 10nm, 1070m, 1060m

PC Perspective Podcast #409 - 07/21/2016

Join us this week as we discuss the GTX 1060 review, controversy surrounding the async compute of 3DMark Time Spy and more!!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

This episode of the PC Perspective Podcast is sponsored by Casper!

Hosts:  Ryan Shrout, Allyn Malventano, Jeremy Hellstrom, and Josh Walrath

Program length: 1:34:57
  1. Week in Review:
  2. 0:51:17 This episode of the PC Perspective Podcast is sponsored by Casper!
  3. News items of interest:
  4. 1:26:26 Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
    1. Ryan: Sapphire Nitro Bot
    2. Allyn: klocki - chill puzzle game (also on iOS / Android)
  5. Closing/outro

Manufacturer: AMD

Introduction: Rethinking the Stock Cooler

AMD's Wraith cooler was introduced at CES this January, and has been available with select processors from AMD for a few months. We've now had a chance to put one of these impressive-looking CPU coolers through its paces on the test bench to see how much it improves on the previous model, and see if aftermarket cooling is necessary with AMD's flagship parts anymore.

DSC_0411.jpg

While a switch in the bundled stock cooler might not seem very compelling, the fact that AMD has put effort into improving this aspect of their retail CPU offering is notable. AMD processors already present a great value relative to Intel's offerings for gaming and desktop productivity, but the stock coolers have to this point warranted a replacement.

Intel went the other direction with the current generation of enthusiast processors, as CPUs such as my Core i5-6600k no longer ship with a cooler of any kind. If AMD has upgraded the stock CPU cooler to the point that it now cools efficiently without significant noise, this will save buyers a little more cash when planning an upgrade, which is always a good thing.

DSC_0424.jpg

The previous AMD stock cooler (left) and the AMD Wraith cooler (right)

A quick search for "Wraith" on Amazon yields retail-box products like the A10-7890K APU, and the FX-8370 CPU; options which have generally required an aftermarket cooler for the highest performance. In this review we’ll take a close look at the results with the previous cooler and the Wraith, and throw in results from the most popular aftermarket cooler of them all; the Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO.

Continue reading our review of the AMD Wraith CPU Cooler!!

Gaming at the low end, checking out the Athlon X4 880K

Subject: Processors | April 26, 2016 - 05:32 PM |
Tagged: Wraith, Godavari, GLOBALFOUNDRIES, FM2+, amd, X4 880K

Remember that FM2+ refresh which Josh informed you about back in March?  The APUs have started arriving on test benches and can be benchmarked independently to see what this ~$100 processor and the Wraith cooler are capable of.  Neoseeker compares the new 880K against the older FX-4350 in a long series of benchmarks which show the 880K to be the better part in most cases.  There are some interesting exceptions to this, in which the FX-4350's slightly higher frequency allows it to pull ahead by a small margin so there are cases where the less expensive chip would make sense.  Read the full review to see which chip makes more sense for you.

01x.jpg

"Today we take a look at the AMD Athlon X4 880K, a quad-core FM2+ processor with 4.0/4.2GHz base/Turbo clocks and unlocked multiplier priced at under $100 USD. It's designed for enthusiasts on a budget looking for the fastest multi-core Athlon processor yet without any integrated GPU to add to the cost. It even shares the 95W TDP of AMD's higher-end APUs for optimized power consumption that further leads to more overclocking headroom."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Source: Neoseeker

AMD Expands Wraith Air Cooler Lineup With More CPUs

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Processors | April 22, 2016 - 11:36 AM |
Tagged: Wraith, quiet computing, heatsink, cpu cooler, cpu, AMD Wraith, amd, air cooling

AMD has expanded the CPU lineup featuring their high-performance Wraith air cooling solution, with the quiet cooler now being offered with two more FX-series processors.

amd_wraith.jpg

Image credit: The Tech Report

"AMD has heard the feedback from reviewers and PC users everywhere: the near-silent, capable AMD Wraith Cooler is a resounding success. The question they keep asking is, 'When will the Wraith Cooler be available on more AMD Processors?'

We’re pleased to announce that the wait is over. The high-performance AMD FX 8350 and AMD FX 6350 processors now include a true premium thermal solution in the AMD Wraith Cooler, and each continues to deliver the most cores andthe highest clock rates in its class."

8350-FX.jpg

The lineup featuring AMD's most powerful air solution now includes the following products:

  • AMD FX 8370
  • AMD FX 8350
  • AMD FX 6350
  • AMD A10-7890K

The Wraith cooler initially made its debut with the FX-8370 CPU, and was added to the new A10-7890K APU with the FM2+ refresh last month.

Source: AMD
Author:
Subject: Processors
Manufacturer: AMD

Clockspeed Jump and More!

On March 1st AMD announced the availability of two new processors as well as more information on the A10 7860 APU.

The two new units are the A10-7890K and the Athlon X4 880K.  These are both Kaveri based parts, but of course the Athlon has the GPU portion disabled.  Product refreshes for the past several years have followed a far different schedule than the days of yore.  Remember back in time when the Phenom II series and the competing Core 2 series would have clockspeed updates that were expected yearly, if not every half year with a slightly faster top end performer to garner top dollar from consumers?

amd_lineup.png

Things have changed, for better or worse.  We have so far seen two clockspeed bumps for the Kaveri /Godavari based APU.  Kaveri was first introduced over two years ago with the A10-7850K and the lower end derivatives.  The 7850K has a clockspeed that ranges from 3.7 GHz to the max 4 GHz with boost.  The GPU portion is clocked at 720 MHz.  This is a 95 watt TDP part that is one of the introductory units from GLOBALFOUNDRIES 28 nm HKMG process.

Today the new top end A10-7890K is clocked at 4.1 GHz to 4.3 GHz max.  The GPU receives a significant boost in performance with a clockspeed of 866 MHz.  The combination of CPU and GPU clockspeed increases push the total performance of the part exceeding 1 TFLOPs.  It features the same dual module/quad core Godavari design as well as the 8 GCN Units.  The interesting part here is that the APU does not exceed the 95 watt TDP that it shares with the older and slower 7850K.  It is also a boost in performance from last year’s refresh of the A10-7870K which is clocked 200 MHz slower on the CPU portion but retains the 866 MHz speed of the GPU.  This APU is fully unlocked so a user can easily overclock both the CPU and GPU cores.

amd_7890k.png

The Athlon X4 880K is still based on the Godavari family rather than the Carizzo update that the X4 845 uses.  This part is clocked from 4.0 to 4.2 GHz.  It again retains the 95 watt TDP rating of the previous Athlon X4 CPUs.  Previously the X4 860K was the highest clocked unit at 3.7 GHz to 4.0, but the 880K raises that to 4 to 4.2 GHz.  A 300 MHz gain in base clock is pretty significant as well as stretching that ceiling to 4.2 GHz.  The Godavari modules retain their full amount of L2 cache so the 880K has 4 MB available to it.  These parts are very popular with budget enthusiasts and gaming builds as they are extremely inexpensive and perform at an acceptable level with free overclocking thrown in.

Click here to read more about AMD's March 2016 Refresh!

The Wraith in action

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 2, 2016 - 03:26 PM |
Tagged: Wraith, fx 8370, amd

By now you should have memorized Josh's look at AMD's new processors and FM2+ motherboards, unfortunately the one thing we were missing was time to test the unit (which totally did arrive, sorry!)TechGage on the other hand did receive an FX 8370 Wraith and had a chance to do some quick tests with this new 95W cooler.  There was a slight hitch, the motherboard they used ran the fan at the full 3,000RPM so more audio tests do need to be run however the thermals show great potential as the FX 8370 never surpassed 57C.  This indicates with a properly controlled fan header you should be able to reduce the speed and noise generated without seeing troublesome CPU temperatures.

AMD-Wraith-CPU-Cooler-Fan.jpg

"It’s not often that we’re treated to a CPU cooler update from AMD, so it was with great interest that we checked out its Wraith in action at last month’s CES. We’ve now been able to poke and prod the cooler over the past week in our lab, and cover everything important about it here. For good measure, we also tackle platform updates."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Techgage
Author:
Subject: Processors
Manufacturer: AMD

AMD Keeps Q1 Interesting

CES 2016 was not a watershed moment for AMD.  They showed off their line of current video cards and, perhaps more importantly, showed off working Polaris silicon, which will be their workhorse for 2016 in the graphics department.  They did not show off Zen, a next generation APU, or any AM4 motherboards.  The CPU and APU world was not presented in a way that was revolutionary.  What they did show off, however, hinted at the things to come to help keep AMD relevant in the desktop space.

AMD_NewQ1.jpg

It was odd to see an announcement about the stock cooler that AMD was introducing, but when we learned more about it, the more important it was for AMD’s reputation moving forward.  The Wraith cooler is a new unit to help control the noise and temperatures of the latest AMD CPUs and select APUs.  This is a fairly beefy unit with a large, slow moving fan that produces very little noise.  This is a big change from the variable speed fans on previous coolers that could get rather noisy and leave temperatures that were higher in range than are comfortable.  There has been some derision aimed at AMD for providing “just a cooler” for their top end products, but it is a push that is making them more user and enthusiast friendly without breaking the bank.

Socket AM3+ is not dead yet.  Though we have been commenting on the health of the platform for some time, AMD and its partners work to improve and iterate upon these products to include technologies such as USB 3.1 and M.2 support.  While these chipsets are limited to PCI-E 2.0 speeds, the four lanes available to most M.2 controllers allows these boards to provide enough bandwidth to fully utilize the latest NVMe based M.2 drives available.  We likely will not see a faster refresh on AM3+, but we will see new SKUs utilizing the Wraith cooler as well as a price break for the processors that exist in this socket.

Click here to continue reading about AMD's latest offerings for Q1 2016!