Wolfenstein II is new, but you don't necessarily need new hardware to enjoy it

Subject: General Tech | March 21, 2018 - 03:27 PM |
Tagged: gaming, wolfenstein ii, the new colossus

If you are on the fence about picking up the new Wolfenstein because you aren't sure your GPU can handle it?  Overclockers Club tested the game with some older hardware as well as the current generation, including the GTX 770 and GTX 980 in addition to a RX Vega 64 and GTX 1080.  After running through the benchmarks they find that the GTX 980 is more than capable of handling this game, so grab it if you have a GPU of that calibre.  If you are looking for the best possible experience, the Vega 64 is the way to go.

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"Having additional GPUs may have proven useful for this work since we leapt from barely playable on the GTX 770 to max settings on the GTX 980. The GTX 1080 naturally surpassed the GTX 980 and the RX Vega 64 beat them all, both at stock and with the undervolt and power limit. Based on this sampling of performance data, if you could pick any GPU to play Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus on, the RX Vega 64 would be the best of those test. However, you can very comfortably go with something older and cheaper, like the GTX 980 without compromising a setting. To my mind, that is pretty impressive for a modern game with modern graphics."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

A New Frontier

Console game performance has always been an area that we've been interested in here at PC Perspective but has been mostly out of our reach to evaluate with any kind of scientific tilt. Our Frame Rating methodology for PC-based game analysis relies on having an overlay application during screen capture which is later analyzed by a series of scripts. Obviously, we can not take this approach with consoles as we cannot install our own code on the consoles to run that overlay. 

A few other publications such as Eurogamer with their Digital Foundry subsite have done fantastic work developing their internal toolsets for evaluating console games, but this type of technology has mostly remained out of reach of the everyman.

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Recently, we came across an open source project which aims to address this. Trdrop is an open source software built upon OpenCV, a stalwart library in the world of computer vision. Using OpenCV, trdrop can analyze the frames of ordinary gameplay (without an overlay), detecting if there are differences between two frames, looking for dropped frames and tears to come up with a real-time frame rate.

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This means that trdrop can analyze gameplay footage from any source, be it console, PC, or anything in-between from which you can get a direct video capture feed. Now that PC capture cards capable of 1080p60, and even 4K60p are coming down in price, software like this is allowing more gamers to peek at the performance of their games, which we think is always a good thing.

It's worth noting that trdrop is still listed as "alpha" software on it's GitHub repo, but we have found the software to be very stable and flexible in the current iteration.

  Xbox One S Xbox One X PS4 PS4 Pro
CPU 8x Jaguar
1.75 Ghz
8x Jaguar
2.3 Ghz
8x Jaguar
1.6 Ghz
8x Jaguar
2.1 Ghz
GPU CU 12x GCN
914 Mhz
40x Custom
1172 Mhz
18x GCN
800 Mhz
36x GCN
911 Mhz
GPU
Compute
1.4 TF 6.0 TF 1.84 TF 4.2 TF
Memory 8 GB DDR3
32MB ESRAM
12 GB GDDR5 8 GB GDDR5 8 GB GDDR5
Memory
Bandwidth
219GB/s 326GB/s 176GB/s 218GB/s

Now that the Xbox One X is out, we figured it would be a good time to take a look at the current generation of consoles and their performance in a few games as a way to get our feet wet with this new software and method. We are only testing 1080p here, but we now have our hands on a 4K HDMI capture card capable of 60Hz for some future testing! (More on that soon.)

Continue reading our look at measuring performance of the Xbox One X!