Podcast #450 - AMD Ryzen, AMD EPYC, AMD Threadripper, AMD Vega, and more non AMD news!

Subject: Editorial | May 18, 2017 - 11:46 AM |
Tagged: youtube tv, western digital, video, Vega, Threadripper, spir-v, ryzen, podcast, opencl, Google VR, EPYC, Core i9, battletech, amd

PC Perspective Podcast #450 - 05/18/17

Join us for AMD Announcments, Core i9 leaks, OpenCL updates, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:20:36

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
    1. Ryan: Gigabit LTE please hurry
    2. Allyn: TriboTEX (nanotech engine oil additive)
  4. Closing/outro

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

 

 

Source:

AMD Teases Ryzen Mobile APUs with Zen CPU Cores and On-Die Vega Graphics

Subject: Processors | May 18, 2017 - 01:01 AM |
Tagged: Zen, Vega, ryzen mobile, ryzen, raven ridge, APU, amd

AMD teased its upcoming Zen-based APUs aimed at mobile devices during its Financial Analyst Day where the company revealed the "Raven Ridge" parts will be aptly known as Ryzen Mobile. The Tech Report managed to acquire a couple slides which confirm some of the broader specifications and reveal how they stack up to AMD's latest Bristol Ridge A-Series APUs – at least as far as AMD's internal testing is concerned (which is to say not independently verified yet so take with a grain of salt).

AMD Ryzen Mobile APUs.jpg

Ryzen Mobile appears to be the new consumer-facing brand name for what has so far been code named "Raven Ridge". These parts will use a Zen-based CPU, Vega GPU, and integrated chipset. Thanks to the slides, it is now confirmed that the Vega-based graphics processor will be on-die. What has not been confirmed is whether the chipset will be on die or on package and exact specifications on CPU cores counts, GPU Compute Units, cache, memory support, and I/O like PCI-E lanes (you know, all the good stuff! heh). Note that rumors so far point towards Raven Ridge / Ryzen Mobile utilizing a single 4-core (8-thread) CCX, per core L2, 8MB shared L3 cache, and a Vega-based GPU with 1024 cores. HBM2 has also been rumored for awhile but we will have to wait for more leaks and/or an official announcement to know for sure if these Ryzen Mobile parts aimed for the second half of 2017 will have that (hopefully!).

With that said, according to AMD, Ryzen Mobile will offer up to 50% better CPU performance, 40% better GPU performance, and will use up to 50% less power than the previous 7th generation (Excavator-based) A-Series APUs (e.g. FX 9830P and A12-9730P). Those are some pretty bold claims, but still within the realm of possibility. Zen and Vega are both much more efficient architectures and AMD is also benefiting from a smaller process node (TSMC 28nm vs Samsung / GlobalFoundries 14nm FinFET). I do wonder how high the APUs will be able to clock on the CPU side of things with 4 GHz seeming to be the wall for most Zen-based Summit Ridge chips, so most of the CPU performance improvement claims will have to come from architecture changes rather than increases in clockspeeds (the highest clocked A-Series Bristol Ridge ran at up to 3.7 GHz and I would expect Raven Ridge to be around that, maybe the flagship part turbo-ing a bit more). Raven Ridge will benefit from the shared L3 cache and, more importantly, twice as many threads (4 vs 8) and this may be where AMD is primarily getting that 50% more CPU performance number from. On the graphics side of things, it looks like Bristol Ridge with its R7 graphics (GCN 3 (Tonga/Fiji on the Desktop)) had up to 512 cores. Again, taking the rumors into account which say that Raven Ridge will have a 1024 core Vega GPU, this may be where AMD is getting the large performance increase from (the core increase as well as newer architecture). On the other hand, the 40% number could suggest Ryzen Mobile will not have twice the GPU cores. I would guess that 1024 might be possible, but running at lower clocks and that is where the discrepancy is. I will admit I am a bit skeptical about the 1024 (16 CU) number though because that is a huge jump... I guess we will see though!

Further, I am curious if Ryzen Mobile will use HBC (high bandwidth cache) and if HBM2 does turn out to be utilized how that will play into the HBC and whether or not we will finally see the fruits of AMD's HSA labors! I think we will see most systems use DDR4, but certainly some SKUs could use HBM2 and that would definitely open up a lot of performance possibilities on mobile!

There is still a lot that we do not know, but Ryzen Mobile is coming and AMD is making big promises that I hope it delivers on. The company is aiming the new chips at a wide swath of the mobile market from budget laptops and tablets to convertibles and even has their sights set on premium thin and lights. The mobile space is one where AMD has struggled with in getting design wins even when they had good parts for that type of system. They will really need to push and hit Ryzen Mobile out of the park to make inroads into the laptop, tablet, and ultrabook markets!

AMD plans to launch the consumer version of Ryzen Mobile in the second half of this year (presumably with systems featuring the new APUs out in time for the holidays if not for the back to school end of summer rush). The commercial SKUs (which I think refers to the Ryzen equivalent of AMD Pro series APUs.Update: Mobile Ryzen Pro) will follow in the first half of 2018.

What are your thoughts on Ryzen Mobile and the alleged performance and power characteristics? Do you think the rumors are looking more or less correct?

Also read:

Source: Tech Report

AMD Announces Radeon Vega Frontier Edition Graphics Cards

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 16, 2017 - 07:39 PM |
Tagged: Vega, reference, radeon, graphics card, gpu, Frontier Edition, amd

AMD has revealed their concept of a premium reference GPU for the upcoming Radeon Vega launch, with the "Frontier Edition" of the new graphics cards.

Vega FE Slide.png

"Today, AMD announced its brand-new Radeon Vega Frontier Edition, the world’s most powerful solution for machine learning and advanced visualization aimed to empower the next generation of data scientists and visualization professionals -- the digital pioneers forging new paths in their fields. Designed to handle the most demanding design, rendering, and machine intelligence workloads, this powerful new graphics card excels in:

  • Machine learning. Together with AMD’s ROCm open software platform, Radeon Vega Frontier Edition enables developers to tap into the power of Vega for machine learning algorithm development. Frontier Edition delivers more than 50 percent more performance than today’s most powerful machine learning GPUs.
  • Advanced visualization. Radon Vega Frontier Edition provides the performance required to drive increasingly large and complex models for real-time visualization, physically-based rendering and virtual reality through the design phase as well as rendering phase of product development.
  • VR workloads. Radeon Vega Frontier Edition is ideal for VR content creation supporting AMD’s LiquidVR technology to deliver the gripping content, advanced visual comfort and compatibility needed for next-generation VR experiences.
  • Revolutionized game design workflows. Radeon Vega Frontier Edition simplifies and accelerates game creation by providing a single GPU optimized for every stage of a game developer’s workflow, from asset production to playtesting and performance optimization."

Vega FE.jpg

From the image provided on the official product page it appears that there will be both liquid-cooled (the gold card in the background) and air-cooled variants of these "Frontier Edition" cards, which AMD states will arrive with 16GB of HBM2 and offer 1.5x the FP32 performance and 3x the FP16 performance of the Fury X.

From AMD:

Radeon Vega Frontier Edition

  • Compute units: 64
  • Single precision compute performance (FP32): ~13 TFLOPS
  • Half precision compute performance (FP16): ~25 TFLOPS
  • Pixel Fillrate: ~90 Gpixels/sec
  • Memory capacity: 16 GBs of High Bandwidth Cache
  • Memory bandwidth: ~480 GBs/sec

The availability of the Radeon Vega Frontier Edition was announced as "late June", so we should not have too long to wait for further details, including pricing.

Source: AMD

Podcast #448 - Mesh Networking, Corsair ONE PRO, Windows 10 S, and Vega Specs

Subject: Editorial | May 4, 2017 - 10:15 AM |
Tagged: Windows 10 S, video, Vega, surface, Predator X27, podcast, ONE PRO, mesh, Intel, google wifi, eero, corsair, atom, Amplifi HD, acer

PC Perspective Podcast #448 - 05/04/17

Join us for mesh networking performance, Corsair ONE PRO, Microsoft / AMD / NVIDIA updates, 'leaked' Vega specs and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 54:15

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week
  4. Closing/outro
 

Source:

Could Vega be just around the corner?

Subject: General Tech | April 26, 2017 - 02:32 PM |
Tagged: amd, Vega, rumours

A Facebook post from AMD Poland has started rumours flying around the interwebs as the implication is we will see it arrive this quarter; though perhaps taking a Facebook post as a verified source may lead to disappointment.  However, there is a bit more evidence than just the post which Digital Trends has displayed, we have seen CompuBench results of a mysterious AMD GPU which is very likely to be Vega.  It will have 64 compute units which translates into 4096 stream processors unless something very strange is going on.  The benchmarks also list two frequencies 1GHz and 1.2GHz which indicates computing performance of 8.2 TFLOPS and 9.8 TFLOPS respectively which puts it in the neighbourhood of the GTX 1080's 8.9 TFLOPS.  That will not necessarily directly translate into gaming performance but does indicate that AMD has a nice surprise in store for us. 

Don't forget to add a bit of salt to your rumour consumption and keep your eyes peeled for more information.

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"Of course, it’s entirely possible that someone at AMD Poland spoke out of turn, and so this information should be considered unverified at this point. But there’s other information that seems to confirm an imminent release, such as a Vega GPU showing in CompuBench benchmark results — something that usually happens shortly before a new component is released."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Teasing a little information out of AMD about Vega

Subject: General Tech | March 28, 2017 - 01:04 PM |
Tagged: amd, Vega, rumour, HBM2

The Inquirer have posted a tiny bit of information about AMD's upcoming Vega and as any rumours about the new GPU are hard to find it is the best we have at the moment.  AMD's claim is that the second generation HBM present on the 4GB and 8GB models could offer equivalent memory bandwidth to a GTX 1080 Ti, which makes perfect sense.  The GTX 1080 Ti offers 484 GB/s of memory bandwidth while AMD's R9 series first generation HBM offers 512 GB/s.  The real trick is filling that pipeline to give AMD's HBM2 based cards a chance to shine and which depends on software developers as much as it does the hardware.  As well, The Inquirer discusses the possible efficiency advantages that Vega will have, which could result in smaller cards as well as an effective mobile product.  Pop over to take a look at the current rumours, here is hoping we can provide more detailed information in the near future.

AMD-Vega-Radeon-Next-Generation-GPU-1920x1080.jpg

"AMD HAS TEASED more information about its forthcoming Vega-based graphics cards, revealing that they will come with either 4GB or 8GB memory and hinting that a launch is imminent."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #439 - GTX 1080 Ti, Radeon RX Vega, and Ryzen

Subject: Editorial | March 2, 2017 - 11:37 AM |
Tagged: Vega, ryzen, podcast, fcat, 1080Ti, 1080

PC Perspective Podcast #439 - 03/02/17

Join us for GTX 1080 Ti, Radeon RX Vega, Ryzen and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Allyn Malventano, Josh Walrath, Jermey Hellstrom

Program length: 1:41:49

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. Casper Ad
  3. News items of interest:
    1. 0:36:35 Ryzen News
  4. Closing/outro

Source:

AMD Unveils Next-Generation GPU Branding, Details - Radeon RX Vega

Subject: General Tech | February 28, 2017 - 05:46 PM |
Tagged: amd, Vega, radeon rx vega, radeon, gdc 2017, capsaicin, rtg, HBCC, FP16

Today at the AMD Capsaicin & Cream event at GDC 2017, Senior VP of the Radeon Technologies Group, Raja Koduri officially revealed the branding that AMD will use for their next generation GPU products.

While we usually see final product branding deviate from their architectural code names (e.g. Polaris becoming the Radeon RX 460, 470 and 480), AMD this time has decided to embrace the code name for the retail naming scheme for upcoming graphics cards featuring the new GPU – Radeon RX Vega.

RadeonRXVega.jpg

However, we didn't just get a name for Vega-based GPUs. Raja also went into some further detail and showed some examples of technologies found in Vega.

First off is the High-Bandwidth Cache Controller found in Vega products. We covered this technology during our Vega architecture preview last month at CES, but today we finally saw a demo of this technology in action.

Vega-HBCCslide.jpg

Essentially, the High-Bandwidth Cache Controller (HBCC) allows Vega GPUs to address all available memory in the system (including things like NVMe SSDs, system DRAM and network storage.) AMD claims that by using the already fast memory you have available on your PC to augment onboard GPU memory (such as HBM2) they will be able to offer less expensive graphics cards that ultimately offer access to much more memory than current graphics cards.

Vega-HBCC.jpg

The demo that they showed on stage featured Deus Ex: Mankind Divided running on a system with a Vega GPU running with 2GB of VRAM, and Ryzen CPU. By turning HBCC on, they were able to show a 50% increase in average FPS, and a 100% increase in minimum FPS.

While we probably won't actually see a Vega product with such a small VRAM implementation, it was impressive to see how HBCC was able to dramatically improve the playability of a 2GB GPU on a game that has no special optimizations to take advantage of the High-Bandwidth Cache.

The other impressive demo running on Vega at the Capsaicin & Cream event centered around what AMD is calling Rapid Pack Math.

Rapid Pack Math is an implementation of something we have been hearing and theorizing a lot about lately, the use of FP16 shaders for some graphic effects in games. By using half-precision FP16 shaders instead of the current standard FP32 shaders, developers are able to get more performance out of the same GPU cores. In specific, Rapid Pack Math allows developers to run half-precision FP16 shaders at exactly 2X the speed of traditional standard-precision FP32 shaders.

TressFX-FP16.jpg

While the lower precision of FP16 shaders won't be appropriate for all GPU effects, AMD was showing a comparison of their TressFX hair rendering technology running on both standard and half-precision shaders. As you might expect, AMD was able to render twice the amount of hair strands per second, making for a much more fluid experience.

Vega-shirt.jpg

Just like we saw with the lead up to the Polaris GPU launch, AMD seems to be releasing a steady stream of information on Vega. Now that we have the official branding for Vega, we eagerly await getting our hands on these new High-end GPUs from AMD.

 

Learn about AMD's Vega Memory Architecture

Subject: General Tech | February 3, 2017 - 01:40 PM |
Tagged: amd, Vega, Jeffrey Cheng

Tech ARP had a chance talk with AMD's Jeffrey Cheng about the new Vega GPU memory architecture.  He provided some interesting details such as the fact that the new architecture can handle up to 512 TB of addressable memory.  With such a large pool it would be possible to store data sets in HBM2 memory to be passed to the GPU as opposed to sitting in general system memory.  Utilizing the memory present on the GPU could also reduce costs and energy consumption, not to mention the fact it will perform far more quickly.  Pop by to watch the video to see how he feels this could change the way games and software could be programmed.

AMD-Vega-Tech-Report-15.jpg

"Want to learn more about the AMD Vega memory architecture? Join our Q&A session with AMD Senior Fellow Jeffrey Cheng at the AMD Tech Summit!"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: TechARP

AMD Announces Q4 2016 and FY 2016 Results

Subject: Editorial | January 31, 2017 - 11:14 PM |
Tagged: Vega, ryzen, quarterly results, Q4 2016, Q4, FY 2016, amd, AM4

Today AMD announced their latest quarterly earnings.  There was much speculation as to how well or how poorly the company did, especially in light of Intel’s outstanding quarter and their record year.  Intel has shown that the market continues to be strong, even with the popular opinion that we are in a post-PC world.  Would AMD see a strong quarter, or would Intel take further bites out of the company?

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The results for AMD are somewhere in between.  It was not an overly strong quarter, but it was not weak either.  AMD saw strength in the GPU market with their latest RX series of GPUs for both desktop and mobile applications.  Their CPU sales seemingly were flat with limited new products in their CPU/APU stack.  AMD is still primarily shipping 32nm and 28nm products and will not introduce 14nm products until Ryzen in late Q1 of this year.  While AMD has improved their APU offerings at both mobile and desktop TDPs, they still rely on Carrizo and the Bristol Ridge derivative to provide new growth.  The company’s aging Piledriver based Vishera CPUs still comprise a significant portion of sales for the budget and midrange enthusiast markets.

The company had revenues of $1.11B US for Q4 with a $51M net loss.  Q3 featured revenues of $1.31B, but had a much larger loss of $293M.  The primary factor for that loss was the $340M charge for the adjusted wafer start agreement that AMD has with GLOBALFOUNDRIES.  AMD did make less this past quarter, but they were able to winnow their loss down to the $51M figure.  

While AMD stayed steady with the CPU/APU and GPU markets, their biggest decline came in the semi-custom products.  This is understandable due to the longer lead times on these products as compared to AMD’s CPUs/APUs and GPUs.  The console manufacturers purchase these designs and then pay out royalties as the chips are produced.  Sony and Microsoft each had new console revisions for this holiday season that feature new SoC designs from AMD for each.  To hit the holiday rush these companies made significant orders in Q2 and Q3 of this year to allow delivery in Q4.  Once those deliveries are made then Sony and Microsoft dramatically cut orders to allow good sell-through in Q4 and not have massive unsold quantities in Q1 2017.  With royalties down with fewer chips being delivered, AMD obviously suffers at the hand of seasonality typically one quarter sooner than Intel or NVIDIA does.

am4_01.jpg

For the year AMD had nearly $300M more in revenue as compared to 2015.  2016 ended at $4.27B as compared to 2015’s $3.99B.  This is generally where AMD has been for the past decade, but is lower than they have seen in years past with successful parts like Athlon and their Athlon 64 parts.  In 2005 AMD had $5.8B in revenue.  We see that AMD still has a way to go before matching some of their best years as a company.

One of the more interesting aspects is that even through these quarterly losses AMD has been able to increase their cash on hand.  AMD was approaching some $700M a few years back and with the losses they were taking it would not be all many years before liquidity was non-existent.  AMD has been able to build that up to $1.26B at the end of this quarter, giving them more of a cushion to rely upon in tight times.

AMD’s year on year improvement is tangible, but made more impressive when considering how big of an impact the $340M charge that the WSA incurred.  This shows that AMD has been very serious about cutting expenses and monetizing their products to the best of their ability.

This coming year should show further improvement for AMD due to a more competitive product stack in CPUs, APUs, and GPUs.  AMD announced that Ryzen will be launching sometimes this March, hitting the Q1 expectations that the company had in the second half of 2016.  Previous to that AMD thought they could push out limited amounts of Ryzen chips in late Q4 2016, but that did not turn out to be the case.  AMD has shown off multiple Ryzen samples running anywhere from 3.2 GHz base with a potential engineering sample with a boosted speed up to 4 GHz.  Ryzen looks far more competitive against Intel’s current and upcoming products than AMD has in years.

am4_03.png

The GPU side will also be getting a boost in the first half of 2017.  It looks like the high end GPU Vega will be launching in Q2 2017.  AMD has addressed the midrange and budget markets with the Polaris based chips but has been absent at the high end with 14nm chips.  AMD still produces and sells Fury and Nano based offerings that somewhat address the area above the midrange, but they do not adequately compete with the NVIDIA GTX 1070 and 1080 products.  Vega looks to be competitive with what NVIDIA has at the high end, and there is certainly a pent up demand for an AMD card in that market.

AMD had a solid 2016 that showed that the current management team could successfully lead the company through some very challenging times.  The company continues to move forward and we shall see new products with CPUs, GPUs, and motherboards that should all materially contribute to and expand AMD’s bottom line.

Source: AMD