CES 2018: Dell Introduces XPS 15 2-in-1 Powered By Kaby Lake-G

Subject: Mobile | January 9, 2018 - 01:00 PM |
Tagged: Vega M, rx vega m, laptop, kaby lake-g, dell xps 15 2-in-1, dell, convertible, CES 2018, CES

Following up on its updates to the XPS 13 last week, Dell today is unveiling a new 15-inch model of its XPS 2-in-1 lineup. The XPS 15 2-in-1, as it's officially named, is powered by the new Kaby Lake-G platform, which pairs an 8th Gen Intel Core processor with AMD Radeon RX Vega M graphics.

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The 15.6-inch touchscreen display is available in both 1080p and 4K resolutions with up to 400-nits brightness and 100 percent Adobe RGB coverage. The display also supports Dell's new Active Pen, an optional $99 accessory which offers 4096 levels of pressure sensitivity with tilt support and palm rejection technology.

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Despite its powerful Intel and AMD Radeon components, Dell claims that the XPS 15 2-in-1's 75Whr battery is good for up to 15 hours of battery life.

Check out the complete specs:

Processor Options Intel Core i7-8705G
Intel Core i5-8305G
Memory 8GB DDR4 2400MHz
16GB DDR4 2400MHz
Graphics Integrated Radeon RX Vega M
4GB HBM2
Display 15.6-inch 3200x1800 (100% Adobe RGB)
15.6-inch 1920x1080 (100% sRGB)
Capacitive touchscreen with active pen support
Storage 128GB SATA SSD
256GB PCIe SSD
512GB PCIe SSD
1TB PCIe SSD
AC Adapter 130W
Battery 75Whr
Up to 15 hours
I/O 2 x Thunderbolt 3
2 x USB 3.1 Type-C
microSD Card Reader
3.5mm audio in/out
Connectivity Killer 802.11ac Wi-Fi
Intel 802.11ac Wi-Fi
Bluetooth 4.1
Dimensions 354 x 235 x 16mm
Weight Starting at 4.3lbs

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Complete pricing information for all configurations is not yet available, but Dell states that the new XPS 15 2-in-1 will start at $1299.99 and will be available for purchase sometime this spring.

Source: Dell
Author:
Subject: Processors
Manufacturer: Intel

The end of the world as we know it?

A surprise to most in the industry that such a thing would really occur, AMD and Intel announced in November a partnership that would bring Radeon graphics to Intel processors in 2018. The details were minimal at the time, and only told us specifics of the business relationship: this was a product purchase and not a license, no IP was changing hands, this was considered a semi-custom design for the AMD group, Intel was handling all the integration and packaging. Though we knew that the product would use HBM2 memory, the same utilized on the RX Vega products released last year, it was possible that the “custom” part was a Polaris architecture that had been retrofitted. Also, details of the processor side of this technology was left a mystery.

Today we have our answers and our first hands-on with systems utilizing what was previously known as Kaby Lake-G and what is now officially titled the “8th Generation Intel Core Processors with Radeon RX Vega M Graphics.” I’m serious.

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For what I still call Kaby Lake-G, as it easier to type and understand, it introduces a new product line that we have not seen addressed in a very long time – high performance processors with high performance integrated graphics. Even though the combined part is not a single piece of silicon but instead a multi-chip package, it serves the same purpose in the eyes of the consumer and the OEM. The marriage of Intel’s highest performance mobile processor cores, the 8th Generation H-series, and one of, if not THE fastest mobile graphics core in a reasonable thermal envelope, the Vega M, is incredibly intriguing for all kinds of reasons. Even the currently announced AMD APUs and those in the public roadmaps don’t offer a combined performance package as impressive as this. Ryzen Mobile is interesting in its own right, but Kaby Lake-G is on a different level.

From a business standpoint, KBL-G is a design meant to attack NVIDIA. The green giant has become one of the most important computing companies on the planet in the last couple of years, leaning into its graphics processor dominance and turning it into cash and mindshare in the world of machine learning and AI. More than any other company, Intel is worried about the growth and capability of NVIDIA. Though not as sexy as “machine learning”, NVIDIA has dominated the mobile graphics markets as well, offering discrete GPU solutions to pair with Intel processor notebooks. In turn, NVIDIA eats up much of the margin and profitability that these mainstream gaming and content creation machines can generate. Productization of things like Max-Q give the market reason to believe that NVIDIA is the true innovator in the space, regardless of the legitimate answer to that question. Intel see that as no bueno – it wants to remain the leader in the market completely.

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Continue reading our overview of the new Intel 8th Gen Processors with Vega M graphics!

CES 2018: Intel Introduces Kaby Lake-G Powered Enthusiast NUC

Subject: Systems | January 7, 2018 - 08:14 PM |
Tagged: Vega M, NUC 8 Enthusiast, nuc, mini PC, kaby lake-g, Intel, core i7, CES 2018, CES, amd, 8th generation core

Intel has announced a new imagining of their high-end NUC mini-PC called the NUC 8 Enthusiast. The most significant difference between this and the previous high-end NUCs from Intel is that this one doesn't rely on Intel's integrated graphics as AMD Vega M graphics are onboard, and along with them the promise of some legitimate gaming muscle.

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What exactly is under the hood? There are two variants, with the NUC8i7HVK (which offers 100W AMD RX Vega M graphics) and NUC8i7HNK (with 65W AMD Vega M graphics). Here first are the specs for the NUC8i7HVK:

  • GPU and GFX: 8th Generation Intel® Core™ i7-8809G  3.1 GHz to 4.2 GHz Turbo, Quad Core, 8 MB cache, 100W Radeon™ RX Vega M GH graphics, 1063 MHz – 1190 MHz Unlocked and VR-capable
  • RAM: Dual channel DDR4-2400+ SODIMMs, 1.2V, 32GB maximum
  • Storage: 2x M.2 22x42/80 (key M) slots for SATA3 or PCIe x4 Gen3 NVMe or AHCI SSD, RAID-0 and RAID-1 capable
  • SDXC slot
  • Connectivity: 2x rear Thunderbolt™ 3 (40 Gbps) and USB 3.1 Gen2 (10 Gbps) and DisplayPort 1.2 via USB-C™ connector Front USB 3.1 Gen2 via USB-C™ and front USB type-A connector Front charging USB 3.0, 4x rear USB 3.0, 2x internal USB 3.0 and 2x USB 2.0 via headers Front Consumer Infrared port
  • Video Outputs: Front and rear HDMI 2.0a (4K 60Hz, HDR) connectors DisplayPort 1.3 via 2x rear Mini DisplayPort ports, and 2x rear Thunderbolt™ USB-C™ ports All ports support HDCP 2.2
  • Networking:  2x Intel® 10/100/1000 Mbps (i219-LM and i210-AT) Ethernet ports Intel® Wireless-AC 8265 M.2 22x30 card, IEEE 802.11ac 2x2 + Bluetooth v4.2, internal antennas
  • Audio: Up to 7.1 multichannel digital audio via HDMI or DisplayPort signals 3.5mm front headset jack, 3.5mm rear speaker / TOSLINK combo jack
  • Enclosure:  Metal and plastic with replaceable lid, Kensington lock with base security
  • Dimensions: 221 x 142 x 39 mm (1.2 L)
  • Internal Headers:  Common I/O header with Front Panel, CEC, 2x USB 3.0, 2x USB2.0 signals
  • Power Adapter: 19V DC 230W power supply with replaceable AC cords
  • Other Features: 
    • Replaceable lid with customizable RGB LED illumination and front panel status RGB LEDs
    • Quad beam-forming mic array
    • VESA mounting plate included
    • Three-Year Warranty

That Core i7 8809G processor listed above is also unlocked, allowing for whatever overclocking might be possibile in this small form-factor. The differences with the NUC8i7HNK are strictly in the CPU/GPU area:

  • 8th Generation Intel® Core™ i7-8705G  3.1 GHz to 4.1 GHz Turbo, Quad Core, 8 MB cache, 65W Radeon™ RX Vega M GL graphics, 931 MHz – 1011 MHz

Besides the new Kaby Lake-G chips there is a lot more I/O in this NUC than we saw with the "Skull Canyon" enthusiast model (NUC6i7KYK), and here the taller design (39 mm vs. 28 mm) doesn't hurt.

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With the bottom half of the rear panel reserved for cooling there is still room for 2x Thunderbolt 3, 2x mini DisplayPort, a full size HDMI, dual LAN, 4x USB 3.0 ports, and 3.5 mm audio (with optical). Up front there is a USB 3.1 Gen2 Type-C port, two more USB 3.0 ports (one charging), another full-size HDMI, SDXC card slot, and a second 3.5 mm audio.

NUC8i7HVK Front Panel.jpg

Just how effectively this small device can cope with the demands of a 65W or 100W GPU - and potentially overclocked quad-core CPU - remains to be seen, but the thicker chassis compared to that previous "Skull Canyon" NUC suggests this has been accounted for.

So how much will this enthusiast-class NUC cost you? MSRP for the 65W GPU version is $799, and the 100W GPU version is $999. Availability is set for March 2018.

Source: Intel

Report: Laptop Powered by AMD Ryzen APU Revealed in HP Datasheet

Subject: General Tech | October 16, 2017 - 03:14 PM |
Tagged: Vega M, Ryzen 5 2500U, ryzen, laptop, hp, Envy x360, APU, amd, 2-in-1

Details on the first notebook featuring an AMD Ryzen APU were revealed by HP from a data sheet on an upcoming Envy x360 2-in-1 notebook, though the PDF was subsequently pulled and now the page leads to a 404. Thankfully, VideoCardz.com has a screen capture:

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HP datasheet capture via VideoCardz.com

In addition to the AMD Ryzen 5 2500U quad-core CPU with integrated Radeon Vega M graphics, the notebook as configured offered just a single 8GB stick of DDR4-2400 - and we all know APU’s like memory bandwidth, so hopefully this will be offered with a dual-channel option (memory “up to 16GB” is offered).

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The current HP Envy x360 2-in-1 design (image credit: HP)

Storage for this Ryzen 5-powered 2-in-1 is listed as a 256 GB PCIe NVMe SSD, and the convertible design offers a 15.6-inch 1920x1080 IPS multi-touch display, premium B&O sound, and of course runs Windows 10.

Naturally, we'll have to wait for some official word from HP on this, as the page and document were apparently put up in error - but not before a few outlets (other than VideoCardz posts include ComputerBase and PC Gamer) released the details from the datasheet. Perhaps that will prompt an announcement? (Here's hoping.)