UNIGINE Superposition GPU Stress Test Released

Subject: General Tech | April 11, 2017 - 09:09 PM |
Tagged: pc gaming, UNIGINE, unigine 2

There are quite a few game engines available these days. Unity stepped up its game and Epic Games, Crytek, Amazon, and others entered the market with various free-to-start licensing options. Back in the early DirectX 11 days, UNIGINE released their popular Heaven benchmark to promote their engine, which had a relatively affordable, up-front fee. (I don’t remember what it was at the time, but the engine currently starts at $1495 USD, albeit royalty-free.)

Available up to 8K60, because lol why not?

Today, they have released a new benchmark, called Superposition, which focuses on two things: VR and GPU stress testing. The setting is some old-timey physics lab, and it includes some minigames to keep you entertained after you determined that your overclock is stable and your performance is assigned some value. According to Phoronix, UNIGINE has been looking into Vulkan, but they haven’t added it to the engine yet. On Linux, you’ll be using OpenGL 4.5, but Windows has a choice between that and DirectX 11.

UNIGINE Superposition is available for Windows and Linux.

Source: UNIGINE

UNIGINE 2 Earth Demo (Video)

Subject: General Tech | December 30, 2015 - 02:15 PM |
Tagged: UNIGINE, unigine 2

Apparently something is coming in 2016, but I don't know what that is. All I can see at the moment is a highly-detailed rendering of Earth, which UNIGINE classifies as a research and development project. The first couple of views are pretty impressive although, despite begging in the comments for a flight simulator with this technology, it looks like this content only works in an as viewed from space context.

That said, it ends up scaling down to the planet's surface, that would be highly entertaining.

Even still, the technology required to convert from recorded, public data into a rendered sphere is impressive. The “procedural data refinement” that converts various masks into clusters of human-made lighting, and so forth, look shiny and believable. This could be highly useful for space games and cinematics at the very least.

unigine-2-space.jpg

The engine itself is impressive. The original UNIGINE was a staple of DirectX 11 benchmarks for years. It made use of tessellation in one of the most compelling, stylized ways we've seen to date. Unfortunately, they seem to be sticking with their large (but not too large) up-front licensing cost business model. This stands against the free with royalty trend of modern engines today, such as CryEngine, Unity, and Unreal. Hopefully it delivers enough revenue to keep them running.

UNIGINE 2.1 was just released in November.