Is it midrange or not? Meet the RTX 2060

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 7, 2019 - 04:34 PM |
Tagged: video card, turing, tu106, RTX 2060, rtx, nvidia, graphics card, gpu, gddr6, gaming

After months of rumours and guesses as to what the RTX 2060 will actually offer, we finally know.  It is built on the same TU106 the RTX 2070 uses and sports somewhat similar core clocks though the drop in TC, ROPs and TUs reduces it to producing a mere 5 GigaRays.  The memory is rather different, with the 6GB of GDDR6 connected via 192-bit bus offering 336.1 GB/s of bandwidth.  As you saw in Sebastian's testing the overall performance is better than you would expect from a mid-range card but at the cost of a higher price.

If we missed out on your favourite game, check the Guru of 3D's suite of benchmarks or one of the others below. 

RTX2060_Box.jpg

"NVIDIA today announced the GeForce RTX 2060, the graphics card will be unleashed next week the 15th at a sales price of 349 USD / 359 EUR. Today, however, we can already bring you a full review of what is a pretty feisty little graphics card really."

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Graphics Cards

Source: Guru of 3D
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Formidable Mid-Range

We have to go all the way back to 2015 for NVIDIA's previous graphics card announcement at CES, with the GeForce GTX 960 revealed during the show four years ago. And coming on the heels of this announcement today we have the latest “mid-range” offering in the tradition of the GeForce x60 (or x060) cards, the RTX 2060. This launch comes as no surprise to those of us following the PC industry, as various rumors and leaks preceded the announcement by weeks and even months, but such is the reality of the modern supply chain process (sadly, few things are ever really a surprise anymore).

RTX2060_Box.jpg

But there is still plenty of new information available with the official launch of this new GPU, not the least of which is the opportunity to look at independent benchmark results to find out what to expect with this new GPU relative to the market. To this end we had the opportunity to get our hands on the card before the official launch, testing the RTX 2060 in several games as well as a couple of synthetic benchmarks. The story is just beginning, and as time permits a "part two" of the RTX 2060 review will be offered to supplement this initial look, addressing omissions and adding further analysis of the data collected thus far.

Before getting into the design and our initial performance impressions of the card, let's look into the specifications of this new RTX 2060, and see how it relates to the rest of the RTX family from NVIDIA. We are  taking a high level look at specs here, so for a deep dive into the RTX series you can check out our previous exploration of the Turing Architecture here.

"Based on a modified version of the Turing TU106 GPU used in the GeForce RTX 2070, the GeForce RTX 2060 brings the GeForce RTX architecture, including DLSS and ray-tracing, to the midrange GPU segment. It delivers excellent gaming performance on all modern games with the graphics settings cranked up. Priced at $349, the GeForce RTX 2060 is designed for 1080p gamers, and delivers an excellent gaming experience at 1440p."

RTX2060_Thumbnail.jpg

  RTX 2080 Ti RTX 2080 RTX 2070 RTX 2060 GTX 1080 GTX 1070
GPU TU102 TU104 TU106 TU106 GP104 GP104
GPU Cores 4352 2944 2304 1920 2560 1920
Base Clock 1350 MHz 1515 MHz 1410  MHz 1365 MHz 1607 MHz 1506 MHz
Boost Clock 1545 MHz/
1635 MHz (FE)
1710 MHz/
1800 MHz (FE)
1620 MHz
1710 MHz (FE)
1680 MHz 1733 MHz 1683 MHz
Texture Units 272 184 144 120 160 120
ROP Units 88 64 64 48 64 64
Tensor Cores 544 368 288 240 -- --
Ray Tracing Speed 10 Giga Rays 8 Giga Rays 6 Giga Rays 5 Giga Rays -- --
Memory 11GB 8GB 8GB 6GB 8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  14000 MHz  14000 MHz 14000 MHz 10000 MHz 8000 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit GDDR6 256-bit GDDR6 256-bit GDDR6 192-bit GDDR6 256-bit GDDR5X 256-bit GDDR5
Memory Bandwidth 616 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 336.1 GB/s 320 GB/s 256 GB/s
TDP 250 W /
260 W (FE)
215W /
225W (FE)
175 W / 185W (FE) 160 W 180 W 150 W
MSRP (current) $1200 (FE)/
$1000
$800 (FE)/
$700
$599 (FE)/ $499 $349 $549 $379

Continue reading our initial review of the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060!

NVIDIA RTX 2060 Details Leaked

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 1, 2019 - 12:41 AM |
Tagged: turing, tu106, RTX 2060, nvidia, gaming

Videocardz recently released information on the NVIDIA RTX 2060 that sheds more light on the rumored card. Reportedly sourced from a copy of the official reviewer's guide, Videocardz claims that they are now able to confirm the specifications of the RTX 2060 including 1920 CUDA cores, 240 tensor cores, 30 ray tracing cores, and 6GB GDDR6 memory.

NVIDIA-GeForce-RTX-2060-VideoCardz.jpg

Graphics cards using the TU106-300 GPU will be available in stock and factory overclocked designs with the NVIDIA reference or AIB custom coolers. Display outputs include DVI, HDMI, and DisplayPort

  RTX 2060 RTX 2070 GTX 1070 Ti  RX Vega 64 RX Vega 56
GPU TU106-300 TU106-400 GP104 Vega 10 Vega 10
CUDA cores 1920 2304 2432 4096 SPs 3584 SPs
RT cores 30 36 na na na
Tensor cores 240 288      
TMUs 120 144 152 256 224
ROPs 48 64 64 64 64
Memory 6GB GDDR6 8GB GDDR6 8GB GDDR5 8GB HBM2 8GB HBM2
SP Compute 6.5 TF 7.5 TF 7.8 TF 12.5 TF (13.7 AIO) 10.5 TF
Base clock 1365 1410 1607 1200 (1406 AIO) 1156
Boost clock 1680 1710 (FE) 1683 1546 (1677 AIO) 1471
Memory clock 14000 MHz 14000 MHz 8000 MHz 1890 MHz 1600 MHz
TDP 160W

185W (FE)

180W 295W 210W
Launch MSRP $349 $499 (599 FE) $449 $499 $399
Pricing 1-1-19 ? $500+ $405+ $400+ ($500+ AIO) $470+(?)

Allegedly, the RTX 2060 will offer up performance that is comparable to last generation's GTX 1070 Ti in 1080p and 1440p gaming scenarios. In a couple games the card even gets close to the GTX 1080 but in most of the titles listed by Videocardz (from the alleged reviewer's guide) the new GPU comes in slightly faster ot slightly slower than the 1070 Ti depending on the specific game. The RTX 2060 and its 30 RT cores can reportedly pull off playable 65 FPS Battlefield V even with RTX enabled with performance looking better with DLSS turned on at 88 FPS compared to RTX off performance of 90 FPS. Granted, that is Battlefield V at 1080p rather than the 1440p or 4k that the beefier RTX cards can push out.

When it comes to pricing, the RTX 2060 will have a MSRP of $349 with AIB and Founder's Edition being at the same level. RTX 2060 graphics cards are slated to launch om January 7th and will be available as soon as January 15th. If true we will not have long to wait until it is official and reviews are unveiled.

If you are curious about the rumored performance, check out the charts Videocardz uncovered.

 

Related reading:

Source: NVIDIA

NVIDIA Rumored To Launch RTX 2060 and RTX 2070 Max-Q Mobile GPUs

Subject: Graphics Cards, Mobile | December 12, 2018 - 10:04 PM |
Tagged: turing, rumor, RTX 2070, RTX 2060, nvidia

Rumors have appeared online that suggest NVIDIA may be launching mobile versions of its RTX 2070 and RTX 2060 GPUs based on its new Turing architecture. The new RTX 2070 and RTX 2060 with Max-Q designs were leaked by Twitter user TUM_APISAK who posted cropped screenshots of Geekbench 4.3.1 and 3DMark 11 Performance results.

NVIDIA Max-Q.png

Allegedly handling the graphics duties in a Lenovo 81HE, the GeForce RTX 2070 with Max-Q Design (8GB VRAM) combined with a Core i7-8750H Coffee Lake six core CPU and 32 GB system memory managed a Geekbench 4.3.1 score of 223,753. The GPU supposedly has 36 Compute Units (CUs) and a core clockspeed of 1,300 MHz. The desktop RTX 2070 GPU which is already available also has 36 CUs with 2,304 CUDA cores, 144 texture units, 64 ROPS, 288 Tensor cores, and 36 RT (ray tracing) cores. The desktop GPU has a 175W reference (non FE) TDP and clocks of 1410 MHz base and 1680 MHz boost (1710 MHz for Founder's Edition). Assuming that 36 CU number is accurate, the mobile (RTX 2070M) may well have the same core counts, just running at lower clocks which would be nice to see but would require a beefy mobile cooling solution. 

As far as the RTX 2060 Max-Q Design graphics processor, not as much information was leaked as far as specifications as the leak was limited to two screenshots allegedly from Final Fantasy XV's benchmark results page comparing a desktop RTX 2060 with a Max-Q RTX 2060. The number of CUs (and other numbers like CUDA/Tensor/RT cores, TMUs, and ROPs) was not revealed in those screenshots, for example. The comparison does lend further credence to the rumors of the RTX 2060 utilizing 6 GB of GDDR6 memory though. Tom's Hardware does have a screenshot that shows the RTX 2060 with 30 CUs which suggest 1,920 CUDA cores, 240 Tensor cores, and 30 RT cores though with clocks up to 1.2 GHz (which does mesh well with previous rumors of the desktop part).

Graphics Card Generic VGA Generic VGA
Memory 6144 MB 6144 MB
Core clock 960 MHz 975 MHz
Memory Clock 1750 MHz 1500 MHz
Driver name NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 with Maz-Q Design
Driver version 25.21.14.1690 25.21.14.1693

Also, the TU106 RTX 2060 with Max-Q Design reportedly has a 975 MHz core clock and a 1500 MHz (6 GHz) memory clock. Note that the 960 MHz core clock and 1750 MHz (7 GHz) memory clocks don't match previous RTX 2060 rumors which suggested higher GPU clocks in particular (up to 1.2 GHz). To be fair, it could just be the software reporting incorrect numbers due to the GPUs not being official yet. One final bit of leaked information included a note about 3DMark 11 performance with the RTX 2060 Max Q Design GPU hitting at least 19,000 in the benchmark's Performance preset which allegedly puts it in between the scores of the mobile GTX 1070 and the mobile GTX 1070 Max-Q. (A graphics score between nineteen and twenty thousand would put it a bit above a desktop GTX 1060 but far below the desktop 1070).

As usual, take these rumors and leaked screenshots with a healthy heaping of salt, but they are interesting nonetheless. Combined with the news about NVIDIA possibly announcing new mid-range GPUs at CES 2019, we may well see new laptops and other mobile graphics solutions shown off at CES and available within the first half of 2019 which would be quite the coup.

What are your thoughts on the rumored RTX 2060 for desktops and its mobile RTX 2060 and RTX 2070 Max-Q siblings?

Related reading:

Source: GND-Tech

NVIDIA's new T-Rex; hopefully not a flaming dinosaur

Subject: General Tech | December 3, 2018 - 02:36 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, rtx, rtx titan, turing

The new Titan has arrived for the RTX generation and the specs are as impressive as the $2500 price tag.

  • 576 multi-precision Turing Tensor Cores, providing up to 130 teraflops of deep learning performance.
  • 72 Turing RT Cores, delivering up to 11 GigaRays per second of real-time ray-tracing performance.
  • 24GB of high-speed GDDR6 memory with 672GB/s of bandwidth — 2x the memory of previous-generation TITAN GPUs — to fit larger models and datasets.
  • 100GB/s NVIDIA NVLink can pair two TITAN RTX GPUs to scale memory and compute.
  • Incredible performance and memory bandwidth for real-time 8K video editing.
  • VirtualLink port provides the performance and connectivity required by next-gen VR headsets.

From what The Inquirer saw over a weekend of YouTubing, the card sports a gold-coloured shroud, and requires two eight-pin PCIe power connectors.  As of yet we don't have any benchmarks to show how it performs but from the sounds of the PR this will be of more use to content creators than gamers.  However, that is unlikely to stop some from trying it out; stay tuned for more.

TITAN RTX_T-Rex.jpg

"The Titan RTX, dubbed fondly by Nvidia as 'T-Rex', is based on the same Turing architecture as the firm's RTX 2070, 2080 and bork-prone 2080 Ti GPUs, equipping it with 130 teraflops of deep learning performance and 11 GigaRays of ray-tracing performance. "

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Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

The other RTX feature, Content Adaptive Shading by Terror Billy

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 20, 2018 - 03:24 PM |
Tagged: wolfenstein 2: The New Colossus, turing, nvidia, content adaptive shading, CAS

Ray tracing gets most of the attention when one of NVIDIA's RTX cards is reviewed, and rightfully so but it is not the only new feature these cards bring to the table.  Content Adaptive Shading is one type of Variable Rate Shading, or VRS, which allows a Turing card to divide a screen into groups of pixels and then focus the application of shading to those groups which require it the most, spending processing time on shading areas which do not. 

The Tech Report delves into this topic in more depth, as well as showing off what it does to one of the few games which currently support it.  See just how The New Colossus is improved by CAS in this article.

cas-comparo.png

"While Nvidia's RTX ray-tracing stack may be getting all the press, the Turing architecture has plenty of other tricks up its sleeve. One of these is called variable-rate shading, and its capabilities lay the foundation for a technique called content-adaptive shading. We tested what this tech can do for the performance of Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus."

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Graphics Cards

 

Author:
Manufacturer: XFX

Overview

While 2018 so far has contained lots of talk about graphics cards, and new GPU architectures, little of this talk has been revolving around AMD. After having launched their long-awaited Vega GPUs in late 2017, AMD has remained mostly quiet on the graphics front.

As we headed into summer 2018, the talk around graphics started to turn to NVIDIA's next generation Turing architecture, the RTX 2070, 2080, and 2080 Ti, and the subsequent price creeps of graphics cards in their given product segment.

However, there has been one segment in particular that has been lacking any excitement in 2018—mid-range GPUs for gamers on a budget.

DSC05266.JPG

AMD is aiming to change that today with the release of the RX 590. Join us as we discuss the current state of affordable graphics cards.

  RX 590 RX 580 GTX 1060 6GB GTX 1060 3GB
GPU Polaris 30 Polaris 20 GP106 GP106
GPU Cores 2304 2304 1280 1152
Rated Clock 1469 MHz Base
1545 MHz Boost

1257 MHz Base
1340 MHz Boost

1506 MHz Base
1708 MHz Boost
1506 MHz Base
1708 MHz Boost
Texture Units 144 144 80 80
ROP Units 32 32 48 48
Memory 8GB 8GB 6GB 6GB
Memory Clock 8000 MHz 8000 MHz 8000 MHz 8000 MHz
Memory Interface 256-bit 256-bit 192-bit 192-bit
Memory Bandwidth 256 GB/s 256 GB/s 192 GB/s 192 GB/s
TDP 225 watts 185 watts 120 watts 120 watts
Peak Compute 7.1 TFLOPS 6.17 TFLOPS 3.85 TFLOPS (Base) 2.4 TFLOPS (Base)
Process Tech 12nm 14nm 16nm 16nm
MSRP (of retail cards) $239 $219 $249 $209

Click here to continue reading our review of the AMD RX 590!

Introducing the Quadro RTX 4000

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 13, 2018 - 02:14 PM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 4000, nvidia, HPC, autodesk

NVIDIA's newest Turing based HPC card the RTX 4000 has arrived, with 2304 CUDA cores, 288 Tensor Cores, 36 RT Cores, and 8GB of GDDR6 on-board GPU memory.   They haven't released any benchmarks as of yet but do state the new memory will offer a 40% increase in bandwidth compared to the previous P4000 and that the card can produce up to 57 TFLOPs of performance, one assumes this refers to INT8 performance.

QN002_QRTX4000_01_v022_HC_2000px.jpg

They are showing the card off at Autodesk, if you visit they have set up a demo which uses the Enscape3D plugin to let you put on a VR headset to step inside a full-scale Autodesk Revit model and make changes in real time, which would be an interesting way to work.  The card will sell for ~$900 which puts in reach of quite a few possible users and might encourage AMD to sell it's Instinct MI60 and MI50 cards for a price in that ballpark.

Check it out on NVIDIA's page here.

 

Source: NVI
Author:
Manufacturer: MSI

Overview

With the launch of the GeForce RTX 2070, NVIDIA seems to have applied some pressure to their partners to get SKUs that actually hit the advertised "starting at $499" price. Compared to the $599 Founders Edition RTX 2070, these lower cost options have the potential to bring significantly more value to the consumer, especially taken into account the relative performance levels of the RTX 2070 to the GTX 1080 we observed in our initial review.

Earlier this week, we took a look at the EVGA RTX 2070 Black Edition, but it's not the only card to hit the $499 price range that we've received.

Today, we are taking a look at MSI's low-cost RTX 2070 offering, the MSI RTX 2070 Armor.

DSC05222.JPG

MSI RTX 2070 ARMOR 8G
Base Clock Speed 1410 MHz
Boost Clock Speed 1620 MHz
Memory Clock Speed 14000 MHz GDDR6
Outputs DisplayPort x 3(v1.4) / HDMI 2.0b x 1 / USB Type-C x1 (VirtualLink) / 
Dimensions

12.1 x 6.1 x 1.9 inches (309 x 155 x 50 mm)

Price $499.99

Click here to continue reading our review of the MSI RTX 2070 Armor!

Gigabyte Reveals Aorus RTX 2080 Xtreme 8G Custom Graphics Card

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 8, 2018 - 06:12 AM |
Tagged: turing, RTX 2080, nvidia, gigabyte, aorus

It was only a matter of time before launches of custom Turing cards started rolling out, and Gigabyte’s Aorus brand is readying a custom RTX 2080 Xtreme 8G graphics card that pairs the Turing GPU with improved power delivery, the company’s WindForce Stack 3X cooler, and seven display outputs.

Aorus GeForce RTX 2080 Xtreme 8G.png

The Aorus GeForce RTX 2080 Xtreme 8G features a 12+2 power phase (versus the reference design’s 8+2) that is fed by two 8-pin PCI-E power connectors. The WindForce Stack 3X cooler includes a hefty fin stack with multiple heat pipes that make direct contact with the GPU as well as a metal plate that make contact with the memory chips and MOSFETs. The three 100mm fans are wrapped in a rather angular and aggressive fan shroud that includes an Aorus logo on the side of the card as well as on the metal backplate. There are LEDs on the power connectors that indicate state and error codes along with the usual fare of RGB LEDs around the fans and Aorus logo with 12 preset lighting patterns. Measuring 59.9x290x134.31mm, the card is a bit over two slots and appears to offer quite a bit of cooling potential.

Display outputs include three DisplayPort, three HDMI, and one VirtualLink USB Type-C connection. Enthusiasts can use up to four traditional DisplayPort or HDMI ouptuts (any combination) along with the VirtualLink output simultaneously.

Gigabyte Aorus RTX 2080 Xtreme 8G.png

Gigabyte has not yet released clockspeed information for the TU-104 GPU and its 2944 CUDA cores or its 8GB of GDDR6 memory which sits on a 256-bit bus (448 GB/s). Unfortunately, the company is also not yet talking pricing on this beast, though you can expect it to come in at a premium versus the company’s current cards that are based around the NVIDIA reference design. I am interested to see how this and other custom PCB cards overclock and how that stacked fan cooler performs with regards to noise and the claims of increased airflow.

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Source: Aorus