Author:
Manufacturer: MSI

Our First Look

Over the years, the general trend for new GPU launches, especially GPUs from new graphics architecture is to launch only with the "reference" graphics card designs, developed by AMD or NVIDIA. While the idea of a "reference" design has changed over the years, with the introduction of NVIDIA's Founders Edition cards, and different special edition designs at launch from AMD like we saw with Vega 56 and Vega 64, generally there aren't any custom designs from partners available at launch.

However with the launch of NVIDIA's Turing architecture, in the form of the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti, we've been presented with an embarrassment of riches in the form of plenty of custom cooler and custom PCB designs found from Add-in Board (AIB) Manufacturers.

Today, we're taking a look at our first custom RTX 2080 design, the MSI RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio.

MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio
Base Clock Speed 1515 MHz
Boost Clock Speed 1835 MHz
Memory Clock Speed 7000 MHz GDDR6
Outputs DisplayPort x 3 (v1.4) / HDMI 2.0b x 1 / USB Type-C x1 (VirtualLink)
Dimensions

12.9-in x 5.5-in x 2.1-in (327 x 140 x 55.6 mm)

Weight 3.42 lbs (1553 g)
Price $849.99

Introduced with the GTX 1080 Ti, the Gaming X Trio is as you might expect, a triple fan design, that makes up MSI's highest performance graphics card offering.

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Click here to continue reading our review of the MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Gaming X TRio

More RTX facts for your enjoyment

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 21, 2018 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: RTX 2080, nvidia, TU104

The Tech Report takes a look at the less of the two new Turing cards, the RTX 2080.  It has not been as well received as the 2080 Ti as it is very similar in performance to the GTX 1080 Ti.  One possible area which the new card might hold an advantage is in frametimes, with the new card providing smoother performance, as opposed to raw frames per second.  As their review shows, this is true in some cases but not all; see if your preferred games might benefit from the new RTX while we await releases which support the new features present on the RTX series.

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"Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2080 brings Turing to a price point that's more accessible than the flagship RTX 2080 Ti. At $800, however, the Founders Edition card we're testing still has to contend with the GTX 1080 Ti in today's games. We see whether the RTX 2080 can establish a foothold as gamers await its future potential."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

A Look Back and Forward

Although NVIDIA's new GPU architecture, revealed previously as Turing, has been speculated about for what seems like an eternity at this point, we finally have our first look at exactly what NVIDIA is positioning as the future of gaming.

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Unfortunately, we can't talk about this card just yet, but we can talk about what powers it

First though, let's take a look at the journey to get here over the past 30 months or so.

Unveiled in early 2016, Pascal marked by the launch of the GTX 1070 and 1080 was NVIDIA's long-awaited 16nm successor to Maxwell. Constrained by the oft-delayed 16nm process node, Pascal refined the shader unit design original found in Maxwell, while lowering power consumption and increasing performance.

Next, in May 2017 came Volta, the next (and last) GPU architecture outlined in NVIDIA's public roadmaps since 2013. However, instead of the traditional launch with a new GeForce gaming card, Volta saw a different approach.

Click here to continue reading our analysis of NVIDIA's Turing Graphics Architecture