EVGA lists new RTX 2080 Ti Black Edition Gaming GPU at $999

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 27, 2018 - 02:13 PM |
Tagged: TU104, RTX 2080 Ti, evga, black edition

Despite the somewhat disappointing launch of the NVIDIA RTX 2080 Ti, things seem to be getting a bit more interesting. Mainly, NVIDIA's "starting at $999" price point seems to be one step closer to reality with a listing for the RTX 2080 Ti Black Edition Gaming card on EVGA's website today.

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With a rated boost clock speed of 1525 MHz, it appears the RTX 2080 Ti Black Edition isn't overclocked from the factory, leading some credence to the rumors that NVIDIA isn't allowing lower cost RTX cards to be factory overclocked.

Still, there should be no difference in overclocking by the end user, including the use of NVIDIA Scanner to automatically overclock the GPU.

The EVGA website lists no availability information for the RTX 2080 Ti Black Edition, but there is an "auto-notify" option for interested buyers.

At $999, the EVGA RTX 2080 Ti Black Edition is still quite an expensive GPU, but a 20% discount is not something to scoff at for what is the most powerful gaming GPU. We look forward to being able to test this card for ourselves in the coming weeks!

Source: EVGA

Meet the highly anticipated RTX 2070!

Subject: Graphics Cards | October 16, 2018 - 02:37 PM |
Tagged: tu106, TU104, RTX 2080, RTX 2070, GTX 1080, gtx 1070, msi, Gaming Z

Some of the RTX 2070 reviews have arrived though you can expect a slew more TU106 based GPU models arriving in the near future.  The MSRP of this card is similar to the GTX 1080, so the burning question is; can it match the performance and not just mimic a slower card with the addition of Tensor Cores? 

Start out with Ken's review, and then head off to [H]ard|OCP to check out the RTX 2070 GAMING Z from MSI.  Does it make sense to pick up the RTX 2070 right now, or grab a highly overclocked GTX 1080?  Only one way to find out

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"We have an exclusive first look at performance of the new MSI GeForce RTX 2070 GAMING Z video cards sporting the new NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 GPU. We will be comparing performance to a MSI GeForce GTX 1080 GAMING X and ASUS ROG STRIX Vega 64 OC video cards in eight games at 1440p and 4K."

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Graphics Cards

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

TU106 joins the party

In general, the launch of RTX 20-series GPUs from NVIDIA in the form of the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti has been a bit of a mixed bag.

While these new products did give us the fastest gaming GPU available, the RTX 2080 Ti, they are also some of the most expensive videos cards ever to launch. With a value proposition that is partially tied to the adoption of new hardware features into games, the reception of these new RTX cards has been rocky.

To say this puts a bit of pressure on the RTX 2070 launch would be an apt assessment. The community wants to see a reason to get excited for new graphics cards, without having to wait for applications to take advantage of the new hardware features like Tensor and RT cores. Conversely, NVIDIA would surely love to see an RTX launch with a bit more praise from the press and community than their previous release has garnered.

The wait is no longer, today we are taking a look at the RTX 2070, the last of the RTX-series graphics cards announced by NVIDIA back in August.

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  RTX 2080 Ti GTX 1080 Ti RTX 2080  RTX 2070 GTX 1080 GTX 1070 RX Vega 64 (Air)
GPU TU102 GP102 TU104 TU106 GP104 GP104 Vega 64
GPU Cores 4352 3584 2944 2304 2560 1920 4096
Base Clock 1350 MHz 1408 MHz 1515 MHz 1410  MHz 1607 MHz 1506 MHz 1247 MHz
Boost Clock 1545 MHz/
1635 MHz (FE)
1582 MHz 1710 MHz/
1800 MHz (FE)
1620 MHz/ 1710 MHz (FE) 1733 MHz 1683 MHz 1546 MHz
Texture Units 272 224 184 144 160 120 256
ROP Units 88 88 64 64 64 64 64
Tensor Cores 544 -- 368 288 -- -- --
Ray Tracing Speed 10 GRays/s -- 8 GRays/s 6 GRays/s -- -- --
Memory 11GB 11GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 8GB
Memory Clock 14000 MHz  11000 MHz 14000 MHz  14000 MHz 10000 MHz 8000 MHz 1890 MHz
Memory Interface 352-bit G6 352-bit G5X 256-bit G6 256-bit G6 256-bit G5X 256-bit G5 2048-bit HBM2
Memory Bandwidth 616GB/s 484 GB/s 448 GB/s 448 GB/s 320 GB/s 256 GB/s 484 GB/s
TDP 250 W /
260 W (FE)
250 W 215W /
225W (FE)
175 W / 185W (FE) 180 W 150 W 292 W
Peak Compute (FP32) 13.4 TFLOPS / 14.2 TFLOP (FE) 10.6 TFLOPS 10 TFLOPS / 10.6 TFLOPS (FE) 7.5 TFLOPS / 7.9 TFLOPS (FE) 8.2 TFLOPS 6.5 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS
Transistor Count 18.6 B 12.0 B 13.6 B 10.8 B 7.2 B 7.2B 12.5 B
Process Tech 12nm 16nm 12nm 12nm 16nm 16nm 14nm
MSRP (current) $1200 (FE)/
$1000
$699 $800 (FE)/
$700
$599 (FE)/ $499 $549 $379 $499

Click here to continue reading our review of the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070!

Author:
Manufacturer: MSI

Our First Look

Over the years, the general trend for new GPU launches, especially GPUs from new graphics architecture is to launch only with the "reference" graphics card designs, developed by AMD or NVIDIA. While the idea of a "reference" design has changed over the years, with the introduction of NVIDIA's Founders Edition cards, and different special edition designs at launch from AMD like we saw with Vega 56 and Vega 64, generally there aren't any custom designs from partners available at launch.

However with the launch of NVIDIA's Turing architecture, in the form of the RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti, we've been presented with an embarrassment of riches in the form of plenty of custom cooler and custom PCB designs found from Add-in Board (AIB) Manufacturers.

Today, we're taking a look at our first custom RTX 2080 design, the MSI RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio.

MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Gaming X Trio
Base Clock Speed 1515 MHz
Boost Clock Speed 1835 MHz
Memory Clock Speed 7000 MHz GDDR6
Outputs DisplayPort x 3 (v1.4) / HDMI 2.0b x 1 / USB Type-C x1 (VirtualLink)
Dimensions

12.9-in x 5.5-in x 2.1-in (327 x 140 x 55.6 mm)

Weight 3.42 lbs (1553 g)
Price $849.99

Introduced with the GTX 1080 Ti, the Gaming X Trio is as you might expect, a triple fan design, that makes up MSI's highest performance graphics card offering.

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Click here to continue reading our review of the MSI GeForce RTX 2080 Gaming X TRio

More RTX facts for your enjoyment

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 21, 2018 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: RTX 2080, nvidia, TU104

The Tech Report takes a look at the less of the two new Turing cards, the RTX 2080.  It has not been as well received as the 2080 Ti as it is very similar in performance to the GTX 1080 Ti.  One possible area which the new card might hold an advantage is in frametimes, with the new card providing smoother performance, as opposed to raw frames per second.  As their review shows, this is true in some cases but not all; see if your preferred games might benefit from the new RTX while we await releases which support the new features present on the RTX series.

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"Nvidia's GeForce RTX 2080 brings Turing to a price point that's more accessible than the flagship RTX 2080 Ti. At $800, however, the Founders Edition card we're testing still has to contend with the GTX 1080 Ti in today's games. We see whether the RTX 2080 can establish a foothold as gamers await its future potential."

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Graphics Cards

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

A Look Back and Forward

Although NVIDIA's new GPU architecture, revealed previously as Turing, has been speculated about for what seems like an eternity at this point, we finally have our first look at exactly what NVIDIA is positioning as the future of gaming.

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Unfortunately, we can't talk about this card just yet, but we can talk about what powers it

First though, let's take a look at the journey to get here over the past 30 months or so.

Unveiled in early 2016, Pascal marked by the launch of the GTX 1070 and 1080 was NVIDIA's long-awaited 16nm successor to Maxwell. Constrained by the oft-delayed 16nm process node, Pascal refined the shader unit design original found in Maxwell, while lowering power consumption and increasing performance.

Next, in May 2017 came Volta, the next (and last) GPU architecture outlined in NVIDIA's public roadmaps since 2013. However, instead of the traditional launch with a new GeForce gaming card, Volta saw a different approach.

Click here to continue reading our analysis of NVIDIA's Turing Graphics Architecture