AOC Announces US Availability of Premium Gaming Monitor Line - AGON

Subject: Displays | September 27, 2016 - 06:23 PM |
Tagged: TN, ips, g-sync, AOC, AGON, AG271QX, AG271QG, adaptive sync, 1440p

AOC has announced two new 27" 1440p gaming monitors specifically designed to minimize input lag and to support the higher refresh rates than many gamers now demand.  The model numbers are similiar but the monitors themselves are very different and each wears a red or green stripe proudly.

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The AG271QX is a TN panel with a 1ms response time and a top refresh rate of 144Hz, it supports Adaptive Sync for those using AMD GPUs.  This panel is great for those who place zero lag ahead of colour reproduction and viewing angle.  It is to retail at $600.

The AG271QG is an IPS panel with four times the response time, still a mere 4ms, a top refresh rate of 165Hz and support for G-SYNC.  This one should have a better colour gamut and truer blacks for those more concerned with fashion over function.  You should expect to see this model at $800. 

Full PR below the specs.

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Source: AOC
Author:
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: ASUS

Another TN Option for FreeSync Fans

If you had asked me a year ago how many monitors we would be able to store in the PC Perspective offices, I would have vastly underestimated the true answer. It seems that not only is the demand from readers for information about the latest and greatest display technology at a demand that we have never seen, but vendors that sell high quality monitors for enthusiasts and gamers are pumping out more models than I can keep track of.

But this is good, right? The more options we have, the more likely we are to find the best choice for each user, for each budget and for each required feature set. But more choices can also lead to confusion - that's where we continue to chime in. Today we are taking a look at the ASUS MG278Q monitor, a 27-in 2560x1440 display with support for AMD FreeSync technology and sporting a maximum refresh rate of 144Hz. With a TN panel rather than IPS, the MG278Q has a current selling price of just $399, well under the equivalent G-Sync monitors.

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Even better, since we started our evaluation on the display, AMD released the Radeon Crimson driver, introducing a new feature called Low Frame Rate Compensation. This essentially allows most of the FreeSync displays on the market to match NVIDIA G-Sync's ability to handle lower frame rates without resorting to V-Sync tearing, etc. If you haven't read about it, do so in the link above.

Continue reading our review of the ASUS MG278Q 2560x1440 144Hz FreeSync monitor!!

Dell 27-inch S2716DG Gaming Monitor Announced with NVIDIA G-Sync

Subject: Displays | August 28, 2015 - 10:02 AM |
Tagged: wqhd, TN, S2716DG, gaming monitor, G-Sync Gen II, g-sync, dell, 27-inch, 2560x1440

Dell announced a new 27-inch WQHD gaming monitor yesterday, and while the 2560x1440 resolution and TN panel are nothing new the real story is the inclusion of NVIDIA G-Sync Gen II that there was a typo in the release.

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Dell provides these details about the S2716DG monitor:

  • Nvidia’s G-Sync Gen II support feature synchronizes GPU and monitor to minimize graphic distortions and screen tearing
  • Quad HD resolution of 2560 x 1440 with close to 2 times more onscreen details than Full HD
  • A full range of adjustability features, like tilt, pivot, swivel and height-adjustable stand allow for long hours of comfortable gameplay
  • A wide range of connectivity features, including DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 1.4, four USB 3.0 ports, USB 3.0 upstream, Audio line-out & Headphone-out
  • 144 Hz maximum refresh rate and 1ms response time

Pricing is listed as $799 and the S2716DG will be available October 20.

UPDATE: Looking at the Dell announcement page, the company links to a Quadro PDF using a technology called G-Sync II. The problem is that technology was releaesd in 2011 and served a very different purpose than the G-Sync we use for gaming monitors today. We always knew that re-using that name would haunt NVIDIA in some ways...this is one of them. So, that means that Dell's reference to a second generation of G-Sync here is simply a typo, or the naming scheme is correct but the writer of the press release linked to something unrelated.

It is possible that a new version of the G-Sync module is on its way with updated features and possibly support over other display outputs, but I haven't heard anything official as of yet. I'll keep digging!

UPDATE 2: Just confirmed with Dell, this was a typo! The S2176DG "was incorrectly listed as "G-Sync Gen II" and the accurate name of the technology is NVIDIA® G-SYNC™." There you have it. False alarm!

-Ryan

Source: Dell
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: Nixeus

Introduction, Specifications, and Packaging

Introduction:

We have reviewed a lot of Variable Refresh Rate displays over the past several years now, and for the most part, these displays have come with some form of price premium attached. Nvidia’s G-Sync tech requires an additional module that adds some cost to the parts list for those displays. AMD took a while to get their FreeSync tech pushed through the scaler makers, and with the added effort needed to implement these new parts, display makers naturally pushed the new features into their higher end displays first. Just look at the specs of these displays:

  • ASUS PG278Q 27in TN 1440P 144Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB270H 27in TN 1080P 144Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB280HK 28in TN 4K 60Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB270HU 27in IPS 1440P 144Hz G-Sync
  • LG 34UM67 34in IPS 25x18 21:9 48-75Hz FreeSync
  • BenQ XL2730Z 27in TN 1440P 40-144Hz FreeSync
  • Acer XG270HU 27in TN 1440P 40-144Hz FreeSync
  • ASUS MG279Q 27in IPS 1440P 144Hz FreeSync (35-90Hz)

Most of the reviewed VRR panels are 1440P or higher, and the only 1080P display currently runs $500. This unfortunately leaves VRR technology at a price point that is simply out of reach of gamers unable to drop half a grand on a display. What we need was a good 1080P display with a *full* VRR range. Bonus points to high refresh rates and in the case of a FreeSync display, a minimum refresh rate low enough that a typical game will not run below it. This shouldn’t be too hard since 1080P is not that demanding on even lower cost hardware these days. Who was up to this challenge?

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Nixeus has answered this call with their new Nixeus Vue display. This is a 24” 1080P 144Hz FreeSync display with a VRR bottom limit of 30 FPS. It comes in two models, distinguished by a trailing letter in the model. The NX-VUE24B contains a ‘base’ model stand with only tilt support, while the NX-VUE24A contains a ‘premium’ stand with full height, rotation, and tilt support.

Does the $330-350 dollar Nixues Vue 24" FreeSync monitor fit the bill?

Read on for our full review of the new Nixeus Vue!

Samsung Announces First FreeSync UHD Monitors

Subject: Displays | November 20, 2014 - 10:50 AM |
Tagged: TN, Samsung, nvidia, monitor, ips, g-sync, freesync, amd

We have been teased for the past few months about when we would see the first implementations of AMD’s FreeSync technology, but now we finally have some concrete news about who will actually be producing these products.

Samsung has announced that they will be introducing the world’s first FreeSync enabled Ultra HD monitors.  The first models to include this feature will be the updated UD590 and the new UE850.  These will be introduced to the market in March of 2015.  The current UD590 monitor is a 28” unit with 3845x2160 resolution with up to 1 billion colors.  This looks to be one of those advanced TN panels that are selling from $500 to $900, depending on the model.

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AMD had promised some hand’s on time for journalists by the end of this year, and shipping products in the first half of next year.  It seems that Samsung is the first to jump on the wagon.  We would imagine that others will be offering the technology.  In theory this technology offers many of the same benefits of NVIDIA’s G-SYNC, but it does not require the same level of hardware.  I can imagine that we will be seeing some interesting comparisons next year with shipping hardware and how Free-Sync stacks up to G-SYNC.

Joe Chan, Vice President of Samsung Electronics Southeast Asia Headquarters commented, “We are very pleased to adopt AMD FreeSync technology to our 2015 Samsung Electronics Visual Display division’s UHD monitor roadmap, which fully supports open standards.  With this technology, we believe users including gamers will be able to enjoy their videos and games to be played with smoother frame display without stuttering or tearing on their monitors.”

Source: Samsung