Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Looking Towards the Professionals

This is a multi-part story for the NVIDIA Titan V:

Earlier this week we dove into the new NVIDIA Titan V graphics card and looked at its performacne from a gaming perspective. Our conclusions were more or less what we expected - the card was on average ~20% faster than the Titan Xp and about ~80% faster than the GeForce GTX 1080. But with that $3000 price tag, the Titan V isn't going to win any enthusiasts over.

What the Titan V is meant for in reality is the compute space. Developers, coders, engineers, and professionals that use GPU hardware for research, for profit, or for both. In that case, $2999 for the Titan V is simply an investment that needs to show value in select workloads. And though $3000 is still a lot of money, keep in mind that the NVIDIA Quadro GP100, the most recent part with full-performance double precision compute from the Pascal chip, is still selling for well over $6000 today. 

IMG_5009.JPG

The Volta GV100 GPU offers 1:2 double precision performance, equating to 2560 FP64 cores. That is a HUGE leap over the GP102 GPU used on the Titan Xp that uses a 1:32 ratio, giving us just 120 FP64 cores equivalent.

  Titan V Titan Xp GTX 1080 Ti GTX 1080 GTX 1070 Ti GTX 1070 RX Vega 64 Liquid Vega Frontier Edition
GPU Cores 5120 3840 3584 2560 2432 1920 4096 4096
FP64 Cores 2560 120 112 80 76 60 256 256
Base Clock 1200 MHz 1480 MHz 1480 MHz 1607 MHz 1607 MHz 1506 MHz 1406 MHz 1382 MHz
Boost Clock 1455 MHz 1582 MHz 1582 MHz 1733 MHz 1683 MHz 1683 MHz 1677 MHz 1600 MHz
Texture Units 320 240 224 160 152 120 256 256
ROP Units 96 96 88 64 64 64 64 64
Memory 12GB 12GB 11GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 16GB
Memory Clock 1700 MHz MHz 11400 MHz 11000 MHz 10000 MHz 8000 MHz 8000 MHz 1890 MHz 1890 MHz
Memory Interface 3072-bit
HBM2
384-bit G5X 352-bit G5X 256-bit G5X 256-bit 256-bit 2048-bit HBM2 2048-bit HBM2
Memory Bandwidth 653 GB/s 547 GB/s 484 GB/s 320 GB/s 256 GB/s 256 GB/s 484 GB/s 484 GB/s
TDP 250 watts 250 watts 250 watts 180 watts 180 watts 150 watts 345 watts 300 watts
Peak Compute 12.2 (base) TFLOPS
14.9 (boost) TFLOPS
12.1 TFLOPS 11.3 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 7.8 TFLOPS 5.7 TFLOPS 13.7 TFLOPS 13.1 TFLOPS
Peak DP Compute 6.1 (base) TFLOPS
7.45 (boost) TFLOPS
0.37 TFLOPS 0.35 TFLOPS 0.25 TFLOPS 0.24 TFLOPS 0.17 TFLOPS 0.85 TFLOPS 0.81 TFLOPS
MSRP (current) $2999 $1299 $699 $499 $449 $399 $699 $999

The current AMD Radeon RX Vega 64, and the Vega Frontier Edition, all ship with a 1:16 FP64 ratio, giving us the equivalent of 256 DP cores per card.

Test Setup and Benchmarks

Our testing setup remains the same from our gaming tests, but obviously the software stack is quite different. 

  PC Perspective GPU Testbed
Processor Intel Core i7-5960X Haswell-E
Motherboard ASUS Rampage V Extreme X99
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws 16GB DDR4-3200
Storage OCZ Agility 4 256GB (OS)
Adata SP610 500GB (games)
Power Supply Corsair AX1500i 1500 watt
OS Windows 10 x64
Drivers AMD: 17.10.2
NVIDIA: 388.59

Applications in use include:

  • Luxmark 
  • Cinebench R15
  • VRay
  • Sisoft Sandra GPU Compute
  • SPECviewperf 12.1
  • FAHBench

Let's not drag this along - I know you are hungry for results! (Thanks to Ken for running most of these tests for us!!)

Continue reading part 2 of our Titan V review on compute performance!!

Video: What does a $3000 GPU look like? NVIDIA TITAN V Unboxing and Teardown!

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 12, 2017 - 07:51 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, titan, titan v, Volta, video, teardown, unboxing

NVIDIA launched the new Titan V graphics card last week, a $2999 part targeted not at gamers (thankfully) but instead at developers of machine learning applications. Based on the GV100 GPU and 12GB of HBM2 memory, the Titan V is an incredibly powerful graphics card. We have every intention of looking at the gaming performance of this card as a "preview" of potential consumer Volta cards that may come out next year. (This is identical to our stance of testing the Vega Frontier Edition cards.)

But for now, enjoy this unboxing and teardown video that takes apart the card to get a good glimpse of that GV100 GPU.

A couple of quick interesting notes:

  • This implementation has 25% of the memory and ROPs disabled, giving us 12GB of HBM2, a 3072-bit bus, and 96 ROPs.
  • Clock speeds in our testing look to be much higher than the base AND boost ratings.
  • So far, even though the price takes this out of the gaming segment completely, we are impressed with some of the gaming results we have found.
  • The cooler might LOOK the same, but it definitely is heavier than the cooler and build for the Titan Xp.
  • Champagne. It's champagne colored.
  • Double precision performance is insanely good, spanking the Titan Xp and Vega so far in many tests.
  • More soon!

gv100.png

Source: NVIDIA

NVIDIA Launches Titan V, the World's First Consumer Volta GPU with HBM2

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 7, 2017 - 11:44 PM |
Tagged: Volta, titan, nvidia, graphics card, gpu

NVIDIA made a surprising move late Thursday with the simultaneous announcement and launch of the Titan V, the first consumer/prosumer graphics card based on the Volta architecture.

NVIDIA_TITAN V_KV.jpeg

Like recent flagship Titan-branded cards, the Titan V will be available exclusively from NVIDIA for $2,999. Labeled "the most powerful graphics card ever created for the PC," Titan V sports 12GB of HBM2 memory, 5120 CUDA cores, and a 1455MHz boost clock, giving the card 110 teraflops of maximum compute performance. Check out the full specs below:

6 Graphics Processing Clusters
80 Streaming Multiprocessors
5120 CUDA Cores (single precision)
320 Texture Units
640 Tensor Cores
1200 MHz Base Clock (MHz)
1455 MHz Boost Clock (MHz)
850 MHz Memory Clock
1.7 Gbps Memory Data Rate
4608K L2 Cache Size
12288 MB HBM2 Total Video Memory
3072-bit Memory Interface
652.8 GB/s Total Memory Bandwidth
384 GigaTexels/sec Texture Rate (Bilinear)
12 nm Fabrication Process (TSMC 12nm FFN High Performance)
21.1 Billion Transistor Count
3 x DisplayPort, 1 x HDMI Connectors
Dual Slot Form Factor
One 6-pin, One 8-pin Power Connectors
600 Watts Recommended Power Supply
250 Watts Thermal Design Power (TDP)

The NVIDIA Titan V's 110 teraflops of compute performance compares to a maximum of about 12 teraflops on the Titan Xp, a greater than 9X increase in a single generation. Note that this is a very specific claim though, and references the AI compute capability of the Tensor cores rather than we traditionally measure for GPUs (single precision FLOPS). In that metric, the Titan V only truly offers a jump to 14 TFLOPS. The addition of expensive HBM2 memory also adds to the high price compared to its predecessor.

titan-v-stylized-photography-6.jpeg

The Titan V is available now from NVIDIA.com for $2,999, with a limit of 2 per customer. And hey, there's free shipping too.

Source: NVIDIA

NVIDIA Announces GP102-based TITAN X with 3,584 CUDA cores

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 21, 2016 - 10:21 PM |
Tagged: titan x, titan, pascal, nvidia, gp102

Donning the leather jacket he goes very few places without, NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang showed up at an AI meet-up at Stanford this evening to show, for the very first time, a graphics card based on a never before seen Pascal GP102 GPU. 

titanxpascal1.jpg

Source: Twitter (NVIDIA)

Rehashing an old name, NVIDIA will call this new graphics card the Titan X. You know, like the "new iPad" this is the "new TitanX." Here is the data we know about thus far:

  Titan X (Pascal) GTX 1080 GTX 980 Ti TITAN X GTX 980 R9 Fury X R9 Fury R9 Nano R9 390X
GPU GP102 GP104 GM200 GM200 GM204 Fiji XT Fiji Pro Fiji XT Hawaii XT
GPU Cores 3584 2560 2816 3072 2048 4096 3584 4096 2816
Rated Clock 1417 MHz 1607 MHz 1000 MHz 1000 MHz 1126 MHz 1050 MHz 1000 MHz up to 1000 MHz 1050 MHz
Texture Units 224 (?) 160 176 192 128 256 224 256 176
ROP Units 96 (?) 64 96 96 64 64 64 64 64
Memory 12GB 8GB 6GB 12GB 4GB 4GB 4GB 4GB 8GB
Memory Clock 10000 MHz 10000 MHz 7000 MHz 7000 MHz 7000 MHz 500 MHz 500 MHz 500 MHz 6000 MHz
Memory Interface 384-bit G5X 256-bit G5X 384-bit 384-bit 256-bit 4096-bit (HBM) 4096-bit (HBM) 4096-bit (HBM) 512-bit
Memory Bandwidth 480 GB/s 320 GB/s 336 GB/s 336 GB/s 224 GB/s 512 GB/s 512 GB/s 512 GB/s 320 GB/s
TDP 250 watts 180 watts 250 watts 250 watts 165 watts 275 watts 275 watts 175 watts 275 watts
Peak Compute 11.0 TFLOPS 8.2 TFLOPS 5.63 TFLOPS 6.14 TFLOPS 4.61 TFLOPS 8.60 TFLOPS 7.20 TFLOPS 8.19 TFLOPS 5.63 TFLOPS
Transistor Count 11.0B 7.2B 8.0B 8.0B 5.2B 8.9B 8.9B 8.9B 6.2B
Process Tech 16nm 16nm 28nm 28nm 28nm 28nm 28nm 28nm 28nm
MSRP (current) $1,200 $599 $649 $999 $499 $649 $549 $499 $329

Note: everything with a ? on is educated guesses on our part.

Obviously there is a lot for us to still learn about this new GPU and graphics card, including why in the WORLD it is still being called Titan X, rather than...just about anything else. That aside, GP102 will feature 40% more CUDA cores than the GP104 at slightly lower clock speeds. The rated 11 TFLOPS of single precision compute of the new Titan X is 34% better than that of the GeForce GTX 1080 and I would expect gaming performance to scale in line with that difference.

The new Titan X will feature 12GB of GDDR5X memory, not HBM as the GP100 chip has, so this is clearly a new chip with a new memory interface. NVIDIA claims it will have 480 GB/s of bandwidth, and I am guessing is built on a 384-bit memory controller interface running at the same 10 Gbps as the GTX 1080. It's truly amazing hardware.

titanxpascal2.jpg

What will you be asked to pay? $1200, going on sale on August 2nd, and only on NVIDIA.com, at least for now. Considering the prices of GeForce GTX 1080 cards with such limited availability, the $1200 price tag MIGHT NOT seem so insane. That's higher than the $999 starting price of the Titan X based on Maxwell in March of 2015 - the claims that NVIDIA is artificially raising prices of cards in each segment will continue, it seems.

I am curious about the TDP on the new Titan X - will it hit the 250 watt mark of the previous version? Yes, apparently it will it that 250 watt TDP - specs above updated. Does this also mean we'll see a GeForce GTX 1080 Ti that falls between the GTX 1080 and this new Titan X? Maybe, but we are likely looking at an $899 or higher SEP - so get those wallets ready. 

That's it for now; we'll have a briefing where we can get more details soon, and hopefully a review ready for you on August 2nd when the cards go on sale!

Source: NVIDIA

This Has to Be Wrong... GP100 Titan P at Gamescom

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 6, 2016 - 11:56 PM |
Tagged: titan, pascal, nvidia, gtx 1080 ti, gp102, GP100

Normally, I pose these sorts of rumors as “Well, here you go, and here's a grain of salt.” This one I'm fairly sure is bogus, at least to some extent. I could be wrong, but especially the GP100 aspects of it just doesn't make sense.

nvidia-2016-gp100tesla.jpg

Before I get to that, the rumor is that NVIDIA will announce a GeForce GTX Titan P at Gamescom in Germany. The event occurs mid-August (17th - 21st) and it has been basically Europe's E3 in terms of gaming announcements. It also overlaps with Europe's Game Developers Conference (GDC), which occurs in March for us. The rumor says that it will use GP100 (!?!) with either 12GB of VRAM, 16GB of VRAM, or two variants as we've seen with the Tesla P100 accelerator.

The rumor also acknowledges the previously rumored GP102 die, claims that it will be for the GTX 1080 Ti, and suggests that it will have up to 3840 CUDA cores. This is the same number of CUDA cores as the GP100, which is where I get confused. This would mean that NVIDIA made a special die, which other rumors claim is ~450mm2, for just the GeForce GTX 1080 Ti.

I mean, it's possible that NVIDIA would split the GTX 1080 Ti and the next Titan by similar gaming performance, just with better half- and double-precision performance and faster memory for GPGPU developers. That would be a very weird to me, though, developing two different GPU dies for the consumer market with probably the same gaming performance.

And they would be announcing the Titan P first???
The harder to yield one???
When the Tesla version isn't even expected until Q4???

I can see it happening, but I seriously doubt it. Something may be announced, but I'd have to believe it will be at least slightly different from the rumors that we are hearing now.

Source: TechPowerUp

CES 2015: MSI GT80 Titan SLI 18-in Gaming Notebook with Cherry MX Brown Keyboard

Subject: Mobile, Shows and Expos | January 4, 2015 - 04:02 PM |
Tagged: titan, sli, msi, GTX 980M, gt80, cherry mx brown, ces 2015, CES

Back in late October MSI announced the GT80 Titan gaming laptop that included an impressive array of features, the most interesting of which was the full-size Cherry MX Brown keyboard embedded in the chassis. Seriously.

gt80-3.jpg

At CES this week we got hands on with the beast and I have to say I came away pretty impressed. Hardware powering the system includes an Intel Core i7-4980HQ processor, a pair of GTX 980M GPUs running in SLI, 24GB of DDR3 system memory, up to quad M.2 SSDs in RAID-0, Killer wired and wireless networking and more. All of that hardware sits under the top portion of the bottom of the notebook - the LED backlit Cherry MX Steel Series keyboard takes up the entire depth of the GT80 in the bottom portion.

gt80-2.jpg

Despite its appearance, the GT80 Titan is similar in size to some of the other 17/18-in Alienware notebooks currently selling, but they obviously don't include a Cherry keyboard will full travel switches. MSI also claims that access to the system memory, M.2 storage, 2.5-in HDD location and optical drive through the top panel allows for reasonable upgrade options down the road. Even the two MXM modules for the GTX 980M cards can be changed through the bottom of the GT80. (Mobile GPU upgrades have always been problematic.)

gt80-1.jpg

The GT80 Titan will be available next week and will start at $3299 with a $3499 option including the faster Intel processor. That is an incredibly high price for a gaming machine that is less "portable" than "transportable" but it would be hard to get more gaming horsepower in a smaller package anywhere else. We are looking forward to a review unit showing up shortly after our return! Stay tuned!

Coverage of CES 2015 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2015 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Blizzard Cancels Their MMO, Titan

Subject: General Tech | September 23, 2014 - 06:12 PM |
Tagged: blizzard, titan, MMO, mmorpg

Titan has been officially canceled by Blizzard after a year and a half delay. Since around May of 2013, the developer attempted to "reset" the project by shrinking its staff down to a core group of thirty, down from a hundred. This team wanted Titan to embody their wildest ambitions, but they realized that it was not going to be fun. "Fun" is not the goal of every game, nor should it be.

Blizzard.jpg

If "fun" was the intention though, and it isn't, then you have a problem.

As for the employees, there does not seem to be any discussion of lay-offs. 16 months ago, when the team was downsized from 100 to 30, Blizzard claimed that its staff would be reassigned to other projects. The smaller, core team is not mentioned today at all, positively or negatively. Whether that is a good sign, and why it never came up in the inteview, is still unknown. Hopefully they will be transferred to an existing game or service, or work on a different, new product.

Source: Polygon
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

A slightly new architecture

Note: We also tested the new AMD Radeon R9 290X in CrossFire and at 4K resolutions; check out that full Frame Rating story right here!!

Last month AMD brought media, analysts, and customers out to Hawaii to talk about a new graphics chip coming out this year.  As you might have guessed based on the location: the code name for this GPU was in fact, Hawaii. It was targeted at the high end of the discrete graphics market to take on the likes of the GTX 780 and GTX TITAN from NVIDIA. 

Earlier this month we reviewed the AMD Radeon R9 280X, R9 270X, and the R7 260X. None of these were based on that new GPU.  Instead, these cards were all rebrands and repositionings of existing hardware in the market (albeit at reduced prices).  Those lower prices made the R9 280X one of our favorite GPUs of the moment as it offers performance per price points currently unmatched by NVIDIA.

But today is a little different, today we are talking about a much more expensive product that has to live up to some pretty lofty goals and ambitions set forward by the AMD PR and marketing machine.  At $549 MSRP, the new AMD Radeon R9 290X will become the flagship of the Radeon brand.  The question is: to where does that ship sail?

 

The AMD Hawaii Architecture

To be quite upfront about it, the Hawaii design is very similar to that of the Tahiti GPU from the Radeon HD 7970 and R9 280X cards.  Based on the same GCN (Graphics Core Next) architecture AMD assured us would be its long term vision, Hawaii ups the ante in a few key areas while maintaining the same core.

01.jpg

Hawaii is built around Shader Engines, of which the R9 290X has four.  Each of these includes 11 CU (compute units) which hold 4 SIMD arrays each.  Doing the quick math brings us to a total stream processor count of 2,816 on the R9 290X. 

Continue reading our review of the AMD Radeon R9 290X 4GB Graphics Card!!

Podcast #258 - Corsair 900D, HD 7790 vs GTX 650Ti BOOST, Leaked AMD APUs and more!

Subject: General Tech | July 4, 2013 - 12:45 AM |
Tagged: podcast, video, corsair, 900D, 7790, 650ti boost, amd, Richland, nvidia, kepler, titan, Intel, ssd

PC Perspective Podcast #258 - 07/04/2013

Join us this week as we discuss the Corsair 900D, HD 7790 vs GTX 650Ti BOOST, Leaked AMD APUs and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom and Allyn Malventano

Program length: 1:14:23

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. 0:58:25 Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
    1. Allyn: USB Practical Meter (kickstarter)
  4. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  5. Closing/outro

 

The Titan's Overthrown. Tianhe-2 Supercomputer New #1

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Systems | June 26, 2013 - 10:27 PM |
Tagged: supercomputing, supercomputer, titan, Xeon Phi

The National Supercomputer Center in Guangzho, China, will host the the world's fastest supercomputer by the end of the year. The Tianhe-2, English: "Milky Way-2", is capable of nearly double the floating-point performance of Titan albeit with slightly less performance per watt. The Tianhe-2 was developed by China's National University of Defense Technology.

tianhe-2-jack-dongarra-pdf-600x0.jpg

Photo Credit: Top500.org

Comparing new fastest computer with the former, China's Milky Way-2 is able to achieve 33.8627 PetaFLOPs of calculations from 17.808 MW of electricity. The Titan, on the other hand, is able to crunch 17.590 PetaFLOPs with a draw of just 8.209 MW. As such, the new Milky Way-2 uses 12.7% more power per FLOP than Titan.

Titan is famously based on the Kepler GPU architecture from NVIDIA, coupled with several 16-core AMD Opteron server processors clocked at 2.2 GHz. This concept of using accelerated hardware carried over into the design of Tianhe-2, which is based around Intel's Xeon Phi coprocessor. If you include the simplified co-processor cores of the Xeon Phi, the new champion is the sum of 3.12 million x86 cores and 1024 terabytes of memory.

... but will it run Crysis?

... if someone gets around to emulating DirectX in software, it very well could.

Source: Top500