All in the wrist? Fingering your Threadripper's TIM

Subject: Cases and Cooling, Processors | March 9, 2018 - 02:45 PM |
Tagged: amd, Threadripper, tim, ryzen

If you are looking for advice on how to install and cool a Threadripper. [H]ard|OCP have quickly become the site to reference.  They've benchmarked the majority of waterblocks which are compatible with AMD's big chip as well as publishing videos on how to install it on your motherboard.  Today the chip is out again, this time it is getting a manually applied TIM facial.  Check out Kyle's tips on getting ready to coat your chip and the best way to spread the TIM to ensure even cooling.

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"AMD's Threadripper has shown to be a very different CPU in all sorts of ways and this includes how you install the Thermal Interface Material as well should you be pushing your Threadripper's clocks beyond factory defaults. We show you what techniques we have found to give us the best temperatures when overclocking. "

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Raven Ridge Delidded: der8auer Posts AMD Ryzen 5 2400G Before and After Video

Subject: Processors | February 16, 2018 - 08:52 AM |
Tagged: tim, thermal paste, Ryzen 5 2400G, ryzen, overclocking, der8aur, delidding, APU, amd

Overclocker der8auer has posted a video demonstrating the delidding process of the AMD Ryzen 5 2400G, and his findings on its effect on temperatures and overclocking headroom.

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The delidded Ryzen 5 2400G (image credit der8auer via YouTube)

The full video is embedded below:

The results are interesting, but disappointing from an overclocking standpoint, as he was only able to increase his highest frequency by 25 MHz. Thermals were far more impressive, as the liquid metal used in place of the factory TIM did lower temps considerably.

Here are his temperature results for both the stock and overclocked R5 2400G:

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The process was actually quite straightforward, and used an existing Intel delidding tool (the Delid Die Mate 2) along with a small piece of acrylic to spread the force against the PCB.

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Delidding the Ryzen 5 2400G (image credit der8auer via YouTube)

The Ryzen 5 2400G is using thermal paste and is not soldered, which enables this process to be reasonably safe - or as safe as delidding a CPU and voiding your warranty ever is. Is it worth it for lower temps and slight overclocking gains? That's up to the user, but integration of an APU like this invites small form-factors that could benefit from the lower temps, especially with low-profile air coolers.

Intel Devil's Canyon Offers Haswell with Improved TIM, 9-series Chipsets

Subject: Processors | March 19, 2014 - 08:00 PM |
Tagged: tim, Intel, hawell, gdc 14, GDC, 9-series

An update to the existing Haswell 4th Generation Core processors will be hitting retail sometime in mid-2014 according to what Intel has just told us. This new version of the existing processors will include new CPU packaging and the oft-requested improved thermal interface material (TIM).  Overclockers have frequently claimed that the changes Intel made to the TIM was limiting performance; it seems Intel has listened to the community and will be updating some parts accordingly.

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Recent leaks have indicated we'll see modest frequency increases in some of the K-series parts; in the 100 MHz range.  All Intel is saying today though is what you see on that slide. Overclocks should improve with the new thermal interface material but by how much isn't yet known.

These new processors, under the platform code name of Devil's Canyon, will target the upcoming 9-series chipsets.  When I asked about support for 8-series chipset users, Intel would only say that those motherboards "are not targeted" for the refreshed Haswell CPUs.  I would not be surprised though to see some motherboard manufacturers attempt to find ways to integrate board support through BIOS/UEFI changes.

Though only slight refreshes, when we combine the Haswell Devil's Canyon release with the news about the X99 + Haswell-E, it appears that 2014 is shaping up to be pretty interesting for the enthusiast community!

Sony is trying to get into your machine again ... in a good way

Subject: General Tech | July 17, 2012 - 04:31 PM |
Tagged: sony, tim, thermal paste, thermal sheet

Say goodbye to messy thermal paste and the time you spent cleaning up the goop that ended up somewhere it shouldn't thanks to Sony's new thermal sheet.  In fact it looks like this new thermal interface material is so easy to use you could do it blindfolded!  The demonstrated performance is equal to that of traditional thermal paste, with Sony claiming a much longer effective lifespan.  At 0.3mm thick it will also provide a thinner layer of TIM than even the most practised of us cannot match by hand.  Check out more at Slashdot and try to avoid the rootkit jokes.

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"Sony has demonstrated a thermal sheet that it claims matches thermal paste in terms of cooling ability while beating it on life span. The key to the sheet is a combination of silicon and carbon fibers, to produce a thermal conductive layer that's between 0.3 and 2mm thick. In the demonstration, the same CPU was cooled by thermal paste and the thermal sheet side-by-side, with the paste keeping the processor at a steady 53 degrees Celsius. The sheet achieved a slightly better 50 degrees Celsius. The actual CPU used in the demonstration wasn't identified. Sony wants to get the thermal sheet used in servers and for projection units, but I can definitely see this being an option for typical PC builds, too. It's certainly going to be less messy and probably a lot cheaper than buying a tube of thermal paste."

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Source: Slashdot