Podcast #384 - Corsair Carbide 600Q, GDDR5X, a Dual Fiji Graphics card and more!

Subject: General Tech | January 28, 2016 - 01:38 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, corsair, carbide, 600q, 600c, gddr5x, jdec, amd, Fiji, fury x, fury x2, scythe, Ninja 4, logitech, g502 spectrum, Intel, Tigerlake, nzxt, Manta

PC Perspective Podcast #384 - 01/28/2016

Join us this week as we discuss the Corsair Carbide 600Q, GDDR5X, a Dual Fiji Graphics card and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

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Report: Intel Tigerlake Revealed; Company's Third 10nm CPU

Subject: Processors | January 24, 2016 - 12:19 PM |
Tagged: Tigerlake, rumor, report, processor, process node, Intel, Icelake, cpu, Cannonlake, 10 nm

A report from financial website The Motley Fool discusses Intel's plan to introduce three architectures at the 10 nm node, rather than the expected two. This comes after news that Kaby Lake will remain at the present 14 nm, interrupting Intel's 2-year manufacturing tech pace.

intel_10nm.jpg

(Image credit: wccftech)

"Management has told investors that they are pushing to try to get back to a two-year cadence post-10-nanometer (presumably they mean a two-year transition from 10-nanometer to 7-nanometer), however, from what I have just learned from a source familiar with Intel's plans, the company is working on three, not two, architectures for the 10-nanometer node."

Intel's first 10 nm processor architecture will be known as Cannonlake, with Icelake expected to follow about a year afterward. With Tigerlake expected to be the third architecture build on 10 nm, and not coming until "the second half of 2019", we probably won't see 7 nm from Intel until the second half of 2020 at the earliest.

It appears that the days of two-year, two product process node changes are numbered for Intel, as the report continues:

"If all goes well for the company, then 7-nanometer could be a two-product node, implying a transition to the 5-nanometer technology node by the second half of 2022. However, the source that I spoke to expressed significant doubts that Intel will be able to return to a two-years-per-technology cycle."

intel-node-density_large.png

(Image credit: The Motley Fool)

It will be interesting to see how players like TSMC, themselves "planning to start mass production of 7-nanometer in the first half of 2018", will fare moving forward as Intel's process development (apparently) slows.