Introduction and Technical Specifications


***Editor's Note*** - Before getting into the nuts and bolts of the Core X9, please understand that this initial review is meant as a detailed introduction into the capabilities and build strengths of the Core X9 E-ATX Cube Chassis. A deeper look into the advanced capabilities of this monstrous case will be explored in a soon to be released follow-up article. Stay tuned to PC Perspective for the follow-up.


Courtesy of Thermaltake

The Thermaltake Core X9 E-ATX Cube Chassis is one of the largest and most configurable they've developed. The case is roughly cube shaped with a steel and plastic construction. The height and depth of the unit allows the Core X9 to support up to quad-fan radiators mounted to its top or sides and up to a tri-fan radiator in front. At an MSRP of $169.99, the Core X9 E-ATX Cube Chassis features a competitive price in light of its size and configurability.


Courtesy of Thermaltake


Courtesy of Thermaltake

The Core X9 case was designed to be fully modular, supporting a variety of build configurations to be able to adapt to the whatever build style the end user can dream up. The case comes with a variety of mounts for mounting fans or liquid cooling radiators to the top, side, or bottom of the case. Additionally, Thermaltake integrated three 5.25" device bays as well as two hard drive bays supporting up to three drives each. The chassis motherboard is removable as well for easy install of the motherboard into the system. The chassis itself can be easily segregated into upper and lower sections for controlling system and component heat flow if desired.


Courtesy of Thermaltake


Courtesy of Thermaltake

Until you can acurately visually just how many radiators and fans that this case supports, you really don't have a feel for the immense size of the Core X9. From front to back, the case support 4 x 120mm fans or a 480mm radiator along either of its lower sides or in the dual top mounts. On top, you can actually mount a total of eight 120mm fans or dual 480mm radiators if you so choose. And that doesn't take into account the additional two 140mm fans that can be mounted in the upper and lower sections of the case's rear panel, nor the three 120mm fans, dual 200mm fans, or 360mm radiator that can be mounted to the case's front panel.

Continue reading our review of the Thermaltake Core X9 Cube chassis!

Just another ATX on the wall

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 12, 2016 - 03:06 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Core P5 Wall-Mounted ATX Chassis

Thermaltake have come up with a unique take on an enclosure, the Core P5 Wall-Mounted ATX chassis.  It is a case designed to be mounted on a wall and to show off all of your components thanks to a clear acrylic front panel.  You can see there is quite a bit of space for components inside which can present a challenge if you are trying for a particular aesthetic but with some creativity you should be able to fill it attractively.  It is an open air design which you should consider when deciding where to mount the case and it also offers benefits when you consider cooling.  Check out the full review over at [H]ard|OCP.


"The main element that Thermaltake wants you to be able to accomplish with it new Core P5 Chassis, is for you to be able to show off your awesome PC system configuration that you have spent weeks working on so that it is near-perfect. While the P5 checks off more feature boxes than that, it surely does a good job of showing off your rig."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

CES 2016: Thermaltake Launches Core X71 and Core X31 Cases

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 6, 2016 - 03:12 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, mid tower, full tower, atx

The new Core X71 and Core X31 computer cases adorn the Thermaltake booth at CES this week, and are the latest in the company's Core series. Both cases are built using cold rolled steel and are aimed at enthusiasts looking to overclock using high end air or liquid cooling.

The Core X71 is a full tower case clad in all black with a mesh front panel and a clear side panel window on the left side. It uses a dual chamber design that separates the power supply, cooling, and storage from the main heat generating components (motherboard, CPU, and graphics). The case is practically all ventilation and can support fans or radiators on all sides with everything but the rear fan covered by removable dust filters.

Thermaltake Core X71 Full Tower Computer Case.jpg

Users can install up to an ATX motherboard and all manner of high end graphics cards thanks to the removable drive cage. Water cooling grommets are positioned on the rear panel and cable management grommets run along the motherboard tray and through the floor of the main chamber into the power supply chamber.

Three drives can be installed behind the motherboard tray in addition to two 3.5" drives in a moveable drive cage and the two 5.25" bays. Cooling can be air or water with up to three 140mm fans in front, three 140mm on top, and three 120mm fans on both the left and right sides of the bottom chamber. Further, there is room for a single 140mm fan on the bottom and the rear panels.

The Core X31 is a miniature version of the X71 bringing it's modularity and emphasis on cooling to a smaller package. Sitting on rounded feet, the X31 has the same black exterior with mesh vents on the front, top, and rear (but not on the sides). A large side panel window takes up the left side and shows off most of the interior. The X31 comes with a black cover to conceal the power supply and give you space to store the inevitable rat's nest of cables to keep the rest of the system looking neat and tidy. 

Thermaltake Core X31 Mid Tower Computer Case.jpg

This mid-tower case can support Mini ITX, Micro ATX, and full size ATX motherboards along with graphics cards up to 420mm long and 180mm tall CPU heatsinks. Storage support includes two 5.25" drive bays, three 3.5" drives in drive racks, three 3.5" drives behind the motherboard tray, and two 2.5" SSDs on top of the power supply cover. The case comes with three fans (and in the case of the Core X31 RGB Edition variant three Riing 12 RGB high static pressure fans with a fan controller) and users can install fans (or water cooling radiators) in the following configurations:

  • Front: 2 x 140mm
  • Top: 3 x 140mm
  • Rear: 1 x 140mm
  • Bottom: 2 x 140mm

The Core X71 and Core X31 have two USB 3.0, two USB 2.0, and one HD Audio port along the top edge of the case. Both cases will be available next month in the US as well as the UK, Germany, Australia, and New Zealand shortly. The Core X71 is currently priced at $150 at Newegg. The base model Core X31 costs $100 and the RGB Edition is $130.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

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Source: Thermaltake

Thermaltake Water 3.0 Riing RGB 240 and 360 Announced

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 8, 2015 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: water cooling, water cooler, thermaltake, cpu cooler

Thermaltake has announced the Water 3.0 Riing RGB, which is a water cooler with multi-color LEDs. Two SKUs will be available, which differ in radiator size. As the title of this post suggests, your choice will be between double-wide (240mm) and triple-wide (360mm) radiators. The lights surround the fan in a ring, and can be modified by a remote into a few different settings. Thermaltake notes that these settings persist after a reboot. I would think that's expected, but the wording sounds like a subtle reference to something. Over my head regardless.


I should note that there appears to be a typo in Thermaltake's specification sheet. On the Water 3.0 Riing RGB 360, it claims that its dimensions are 326x120x27mm. 326mm is the same length as its rubber tubing and, to say the least, it seems very unlikely that they intend to fit three, 120mm fans (360mm total) into a length that's 326mm long (plus fit the hosing off one side). The 240 model is listed as being 270mm long, which leaves 30mm for spacing and tubing, and that seems about right. I assume that they accidentally wrote the tube length as the radiator length. I have attempted to contact Thermaltake PR for clarification. I'll update the post if I get through and receive a response. This should be fine for most users looking to install a triple-wide radiator, but you should hold off if a few centimeters make or break your build.

No pricing or availability has been released yet.

Source: Thermaltake

MSI & Thermaltake Make Motherboard-Specific Water Block

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 29, 2015 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: thermaltake, msi, CPU Water Block, cooler

Normally a water block presses against the CPU heatspreader, but this one is a bit different. MSI and Thermaltake decided to team up and make a motherboard-specific cooler that pulls heat away from the CPU and the motherboard's VRM MOSFETs. This way, water chills both the CPU and its power delivery, which could be a bottleneck when overclocking.


Specifically, the Thermaltake Pacific M3 motherboard water block is designed to be used with the MSI Z170A Gaming M5 motherboard. This is a Skylake / DDR4 platform with USB 3.1 and SATA Express.

Note that this is not a closed-loop cooler. It is designed to be embedded in a custom cooling loop, which means that the user (or a small business computer store that maintains their PC) is responsible for routing water and preventing leaks. That said, users who are looking for a high-quality cooler for their power delivery system should expect a little commitment to their build (and a little risk).

Also, since the product is designed for a specific motherboard, the user shouldn't expect to keep it hanging around from build to build. You will almost definitely use it while you have it and leave it when you move on. On the other hand, you shouldn't worry about it covering your RAM or anything -- you can be reasonably assured that it's built for your setup. (That is, unless you buy the wrong motherboard or something... d'oh!)

Source: Thermaltake

Thermaltake would like you to "Get to the Suppressa!"

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 27, 2015 - 03:04 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Suppressor F31

The Thermaltake Suppressor F31 is significantly smaller than the F51, 497x250x515mm (19.5x9.8x20.3") and so cannot fit an eATX motherboard like its bigger sibling.  On the other hand that size is much more manageable for many and is still large enough for radiators, Morry-sized heatsinks and full sized graphics cards.  The simplicity of the exterior will appeal to many as will the many removable filters over fan intakes.  As you might expect from the name, the case is designed to quiet the components running inside and did not disappoint when [H]ard|OCP tested the case.  Check out their full review if your PC components need a new home.


"Thermaltake is upping its computer case game with the new Suppressor F31 chassis. It is nice and wide at 250mm and has plenty of features. "Leading-edge sound reduction panels on all sides, expand your cooling options with removable panels for the perfect balance in silent operation and cooling performance."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:



Source: [H]ard|OCP

Even more keyboards, check out Thermaltake's Poseidon Z RGB

Subject: General Tech | November 23, 2015 - 03:16 PM |
Tagged: poseidon Z RGB, thermaltake, mechanical keyboard, input

The keyboard market has changed drastically over the past year with the introduction of mainstream mechanical keys and improved LED backlighting features.  Where once the market was not that competitive and only a few major players were offering products we now have a wide variety of brands to choose from.  This makes it hard to stand out in the market without adding extra features to your keyboards, which leads us to the Thermaltake Poseidon RGB.  This particular keyboard has an integrated 32-bit processor which allows you to choose between 16.8 million colors for each key.  The keys use Kailh Brown RGB switches, a less expensive clone of the Cherry MX Brown switches more commonly found on these types of boards.  Find out if they are good enough over at Benchmark Reviews.


"Just a few months ago, full RGB mechanical keyboards were rare beasts, and the inclusion of full per-key RGB lighting commanded a very high price, with some keyboards selling for almost $200.00. Now, prices are coming down rapidly and vendors are starting to compete on features, but how many more features are there left to add?"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Thermaltake Toughpower Grand 1200W, for when you need 8 PCIe power connectors

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 3, 2015 - 01:34 PM |
Tagged: PSU, Toughpower, thermaltake, ToughPower Grand 1200W, modular psu, 80 Plus Gold

The Thermaltake Grand series has been around for quite some time and has just been refreshed with a new model and a new price.  The PSU has a single 12V rail, capable of delivering 100% of the wattage at 100A which makes sense for a kilowatt class PSU which has eight 6+2 PCIe connectors.  It is rated at 80 Plus Gold which [H]ard|OCP's testing showed was essentially accurate, their test bed just snuck under the rating at 100% load.  With a 7 year warranty and a $240 price tag it is right in the middle of the pack for PSUs of this power, not perfect but certainly OK.

If you don't need a 1000+ watt PSU then you should revist Lee's review of the Thermaltake Toughpower DPS G 850W PSU.


"Thermaltake is back with a new 1200 watt fully modular PSU. We have used Thermaltake power supplies on our test bench literally for years with excellent results. However the Toughpower line has not always been the best value out there, but today we see a 1200 watt PSU with revised pricing."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:


Source: [H]ard|OCP
Manufacturer: Thermaltake

Introduction and Features


Thermaltake is expanding their Digital Power Supply (DPS) lineup with the introduction of the new Toughpower DPS G Series, which includes six models ranging from 450W up to 1050W. We will be taking a detailed look at the Toughpower DPS G 850W PSU in this review. Note: the new DPS G Series is a new line and is different than the Toughpower DPS 750W/850W/1050W models, which use the basic DPS App software. All DPS G Series power supplies support Thermaltakes new comprehensive suite of Smart Power Management (SPM) software. Thermaltake has also introduced four DPS G power supplies in their Smart Series, the Smart DPS G 600W/650W/700W/750W  

Thermaltake’s new DPS G Series power supplies incorporate an embedded digital controller, which enables them to communicate with the Smart Power Management software to monitor and record various functions of the PC and power supply. Some of Thermaltakes competition (notably Corsair) has offered “digital” power supplies for some time. Even though Thermaltake may be coming a little late to the party, they appear to have done their homework and continue to expand the software, which now includes a full suite of digital monitoring, recording and analysis software to support the Toughpower DPS G Series power supplies.


(Courtesy of Thermaltake)

The Toughpower DPS G 850W power supply features fully modular, flat-ribbon style cables, 80 Plus Gold certification for high efficiency, is Haswell and ErP Lot ready, and supports multiple graphic adapters with six PCI-E connectors.


Thermaltake Toughpower DPS G 850W PSU Key Features:

•    850W continuous DC output (up to 50°C)
•    Embedded digital controller communicates with Thermaltake’s SPM software
•    80 PLUS Gold certified, at least 90% efficiency under 50% load
•    Fully modular cables for easy installation
•    Flat ribbon-style, low profile cables for a clean installation
•    Single high-current +12V output (70.8A/249.7W)
•    Dual ball bearing 140mm fan for reliability and long life
•    High-quality Japanese made electrolytic capacitors (105°C)
•    ErP Lot and Haswell ready
•    NVIDIA SLI ready with six 6+2 pin PCI-E connectors
•    Active Power Factor correction (0.99) with Universal AC input
•    Safety Protections : OVP, UVP, SCP, and OPP
•    7-Year Warranty
•    MSRP for the Toughpower DPS G 850W: $199.99 USD

Please continue reading our review of the Toughpower DPS G 850W PSU!!!

Thermaltake Releases Core P5 Wall-Mountable Case

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 5, 2015 - 09:01 AM |
Tagged: wall mount, thermaltake

Personally, I would like to see at least an option for plexiglass on the perimeter. I feel like some might want a bit of protection from things like sneezes, or rogue squirt-gun blasts. The “case” is basically a plate with a clear acrylic pane in front of it. It can stand upright, be rotated horizontally, or even screwed into a wall if you want to show off a custom liquid coolant loops or something.


Interestingly, Thermaltake is providing “3D Printing Accessory Files”. I somehow doubt that this will be the CAD files required to lasercut your own Core P5 case, but it's designed to allow makers to create their own accessories for it. As such, this sounds more like guides and schematics, but I cannot say for sure because I haven't tried it... and they're not available yet.

The Thermaltake Core P5 will be available soon for an MSRP of $169.99, although it's already at a sale price of $149.99. This could be just a pre-order discount, or a sign of its typical price point. We don't know.

Source: Thermaltake