Ok Team, Group Delta'S TUF ... RGB SSDs ASUS'd as ready

Subject: Storage | February 12, 2019 - 03:48 PM |
Tagged: team group, delta TUF RGB, ssd, RGB, QLC, S2258

Team Group and ASUS have ... collaborated ... to bring you a new TUF branded SSD with all the RGBs you could want.  Inside is 64 layer 3D TLC NAND from Micron, attached to Silicon Motion's SM2258 controller, which tells you just about all you need to know about the performance.  If you aren't familiar with how that particular combo performs compared to the competition then the Guru of 3D will be more than happy to show you.

What this drive does do differently is provide you with a 12V RGB header to allow ASUS' AURA software to colourize your storage.  If your SSD is mounted plain sight and not contributing to the light show in your case, this might be a good way to feed your need for more RGB light bleed.

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"Today, we have a relatively new product from Taiwain based company Team Group to review. Part of their new collab with Asus' long lived 'TUF' lineup, this SSD brings beefy looks, RGB, and solid specifications to the 240GB, 500GB, and 1TB storage points. Let's check it out."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: Guru of 3D

PC Perspective Podcast #530 - New NVMe SSDs, RTX 2060 Overclocking, and AMD Q4 Earnings

Subject: General Tech | February 1, 2019 - 08:50 AM |
Tagged: wd black, W-3175X, TSMC, ssd, SFX, seasonic, samsung 970 evo, Samsung, RTX 2060, radeon vii, quarterly earnings, overclocking, NVMe, gtx 1660 ti, cooler master, benchmarks, podcast

PC Perspective Podcast #530 - 1/30/2019

This week on the show, we have reviews of two power supplies, two new NVMe SSDs from Samsung and Western Digital, a look at a new low-profile keyboard from Cooler Master, more RTX 2060 benchmarks and overclocking, Radeon VII rumors and leaked benchmarks, AMD's Q4 earnings, and more!

Subscribe to the PC Perspective Podcast

Check out previous podcast episodes: http://pcper.com/podcast

Show Topics
00:02:30 - Review: Seasonic SGX-650 PSU
00:04:13 - Review: Cooler Master MWE Gold 750W PSU
00:05:21 - Review: WD Black SN750 NVMe SSD
00:10:33 - Review: Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe SSD
00:18:18 - Review: Cooler Master SK630 Low Profile Keyboard
00:21:42 - Review: RTX 2060 1440p & Overclocking Benchmarks
00:27:57 - News: Trouble at TSMC?
00:31:00 - News: AMD Gonzalo APU & Next-Gen Console Specs
00:39:47 - News: Radeon VII Rumors & Benchmarks
00:44:15 - News: GTX 1660 Ti Rumors
00:46:50 - News: Samsung OLED Displays for Notebooks
00:50:14 - News: Backblaze HDD Longevity Report
00:52:44 - News: Intel 28-Core Xeon W-3175X
00:58:41 - News: Samsung 1TB eUFS Chip for Smartphones
01:01:56 - News: AMD Q4 Earnings
01:13:48 - Picks of the Week
01:20:59 - Outro

Picks of the Week
Jim: 36 Bottles of NyQuil
Jeremy: Legend of Zelda Total Conversion for Doom
Josh: Kindle Paperwhite
Sebastian: ShutUp10

Today's Podcast Hosts
Sebastian Peak
Josh Walrath
Jeremy Hellstrom
Jim Tanous

Mercury Systems Ships First Space-Qualified Commercial SSD for LEO Satellites

Subject: Storage | January 23, 2019 - 05:35 PM |
Tagged: TRRUST-Stor VPX RT, ssd, slc, radiation, amusing

Mercury Systems are well known for providing military grade secure storage, which means a little more than a truck commercial, but is still just FIPS 197 which is also know as AES.  Mercury uses AES-256 but both AES-128 and AES-192 can be classified as FIPS 197. 

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The security of the drive above is not what makes it worth mentioning however, it is the fact it is rated for use in low earth orbit which is interesting.  The drive is as Al says, "a bunch of SLC in a poly filled enclosure", with the poly offering the following (PDF link):

  • Rad-Tolerant Design (RTG4 Based): Configuration upsets immunity to LET > 103 MeV.cm2/mg
  • Single-event latch-up (SEL) immunity to LET > 103 MeV.cm2/mg
  • Registers SEU rate <10-12 errors/bit-day (GEO Solar Min)
  • Single-event transient (SET) upset rate < 10-8 errors/bit-day (GEO Solar Min)
  • Total ionizing dose (TID) > 100 Krad

The 440GB of SLC flash is capable of reading and writing at 1GB/s with a 26 PB write minimum life expectancy.  If you are serious about long term resilient storage, and can afford paying governmental rates you could drop them a line to get on the waiting list. 

Conversely, the next time you are playing a post apocalyptic RPG, you are now fully able to complain about the crappy storage media the game provides and demand something a little bit better.  It won't be quite as easy to hack into as a RobCo terminal but if you can get at the data those logs will load a whole lot faster.

 

Samsung's new 970 EVO is almost double Plus good

Subject: Storage | January 22, 2019 - 03:27 PM |
Tagged: storage, ssd, Samsung, NVMe, M.2 2280, M.2, IOPS, EVO, 970 EVO, 3d nand

Jim was not the only one who completed benchmarking Samsung's new 970 EVO Plus, The Tech Report also chewed on the new gum stick for a while.  Whereas we had the 1TB model, it was the 500GB model which they reviewed and while many of the specifications are the same there are some slight differences worth investigating.  Their custom RoboBench tests real performance and shows just how impressive this drives performance is.  Not only is this drive faster than the previous generations, the price is also much more attractive as we are supposed to see this 500GB drive sell for $130 and the 1TB for $250; let's hope that is the case!

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"Samsung's 900-series EVO drives have been mainstays since NVMe went mainstream. The company has released a newly refreshed version of the 970 EVO that's so good they gave it a "Plus" suffix. We take it apart to see if it's as good as it sounds."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Author:
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Samsung

Samsung today is launching a new member of its consumer-targeted family of NVMe SSDs, the Samsung 970 EVO Plus. Thanks to the upgrade from 64-layer to 96-layer V-NAND, this new drive promises significantly better write performance, a slight bump to overall responsiveness, and improved efficiency all in the same single-sided package at capacities up to 2TB.

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This new drive, a mid-cycle refresh that keeps the well-regarded 970-series on the market, looks impressive on paper. But do those soaring advertised IOPS and insane write speeds hold up in reality? Check out our initial review of the Samsung 970 EVO Plus.

Author:
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Western Digital

WD Black SN750 NVMe SSD Review

Western Digital today is launching the latest version of its Black-series NVMe SSDs. Like its predecessor, the WD Black SN750 is targeted at gamers, introducing a new "Gaming Mode" that tunes the drive to favor performance over power efficiency.

The drive will be available in two variants — one including a heatsink and one without — in capacities up to 2TB. Western Digital worked with cooling experts EK to design the heatsink.

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We had a brief time to review the 1TB non-heatsink model and have some initial performance results to share.

Read on for our review of the WD Black SN750 NVMe SSD.

Phison Previews PCIe Gen4 x4 NVMe with PS5016-E16 Controller

Subject: Storage | January 11, 2019 - 09:36 AM |
Tagged: ssd controller, ssd, solid state drive, PS5016-E16, phison, PCIe Gen4, PCI Express 4.0, NVMe

One of the areas that can see an immediate impact from PCI Express Gen 4 which will first arrive with AMD’s upcoming Ryzen desktop processors is storage, and to that end Phison is not waiting around to show just what we can expect from the first generation of PCIe Gen4 SSDs.

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Phison PS5016-E16 performance slide (image credit: ComputerBase)

The company’s PS5016-E16 controller was on display at CES in a prototype device, and is powered by a quad-core solution combining two ARM cores with a pair of proprietary CO-X processor cores from Phison. Basic specs from Phison include:

  • PCIe Gen4 x4 NVMe
  • 8 Channels with 32 CEs
  • NAND interface: 800 MT/s support
  • DDR4 interface: 1600 Mb/s support
  • 3D TLC and QLC support
  • Designed with Phison’s 4th Gen LDPC Engine

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Phison PS5016-E16 prototype device (image credit: Legit Reviews)

As to performance, Phison lists sequentials of 4000 MB/s reads and 4100 MB/s writes, while providing a graphic showing CrystalDiskMark results slightly exceeding these numbers. How can Phison exceed the potential of PCIe Gen3 x4 with this early demo? As reported by Legit Reviews Phison is using a Gen4HOST add-in card from PLDA, which “uses a PCIe 3.0 x16 (upstream) to PCIe 4.0 x8 (downstream) integration backplane for development and validation of PCIe 4.0 endpoints”.

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Phison PS5016-E16 demo system in action (image credit: Legit Reviews)

The Phison PCIe Gen4 x4 NVMe controller is expected to hit the consumer market by Q3 2019.

Source: ComputerBase
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Crucial

Introduction

Once we saw Intel launch QLC flash installed in their recent 660p M.2 part, I had a feeling that Micron would not be far behind, and that feeling has been confirmed with the launch of the Crucial P1 M.2 SSDs:

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Both the 500GB and 1TB models are single sided. The 2TB (not yet released) will likely have packages installed at the rear.

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No surprises with the packaging. Does the job just fine.

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Specs are also reasonably standard for an NVMe SSD at this point, though we do see a bit more of a falloff at the lower capacities here. This is partially due to the use of QLC flash, even though these specs are likely assuming full use of the available SLC cache. Since QLC allows for higher capacity per die, that translates to fewer dies for a given SSD total capacity, which lowers overall performance even at SLC speeds. This is a common trait/tradeoff for the use of higher capacity dies.

Read on for our review of the Crucial P1!

Intel's Optane DC Persistent Memory DIMMs Push Latency Closer to DRAM

Subject: Storage | December 12, 2018 - 09:17 AM |
Tagged: ssd, Optane, Intel, DIMM, 3D XPoint

Intel's architecture day press release contains the following storage goodness mixed within all of the talk about 3D chip packaging:

Memory and Storage: Intel discussed updates on Intel® Optane™ technology and the products based upon that technology. Intel® Optane™ DC persistent memory is a new product that converges memory-like performance with the data persistence and large capacity of storage. The revolutionary technology brings more data closer to the CPU for faster processing of bigger data sets like those used in AI and large databases. Its large capacity and data persistence reduces the need to make time-consuming trips to storage, which can improve workload performance. Intel Optane DC persistent memory delivers cache line (64B) reads to the CPU. On average, the average idle read latency with Optane persistent memory is expected to be about 350 nanoseconds when applications direct the read operation to Optane persistent memory, or when the requested data is not cached in DRAM. For scale, an Optane DC SSD has an average idle read latency of about 10,000 nanoseconds (10 microseconds), a remarkable improvement.2  In cases where requested data is in DRAM, either cached by the CPU’s memory controller or directed by the application, memory sub-system responsiveness is expected to be identical to DRAM (<100 nanoseconds).
 
The company also showed how SSDs based on Intel’s 1 Terabit QLC NAND die move more bulk data from HDDs to SSDs, allowing faster access to that data.

Did you catch that? 3D XPoint memory in DIMM form factor is expected to have an access latency of 350 nanoseconds! That's down from 10 microseconds of the PCIe-based Optane products like Optane Memory and the P4800X. I realize those are just numbers, and showing a nearly 30x latency improvement may be easier visually, so here:

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Above is an edit to my Bridging the Gap chart from the P4800X review, showing where this new tech would fall in purple. That's all we have to go on for now, but these are certainly exciting times. Consider that non-volatile storage latencies have improved by nearly 100,000x over the last decade, and are now within striking distance (less than 10x) of DRAM! Before you get too excited, realize that Optane DIMMs will be showing up in enterprise servers first, as they require specialized configurations to treat DIMM slots as persistent storage instead of DRAM. That said, I'm sure the tech will eventually trickle down to desktops in some form or fashion. If you're hungry for more details on what makes 3D XPoint tick, check out how 3D XPoint works in my prior article.

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We are SSDs ... I got all my QVO with me

Subject: Storage | November 27, 2018 - 06:54 PM |
Tagged: ssd, slc, sata, Samsung, QLC, 860 QVO, 2.5

Samsung have jumped up the alphabet, going from EVO to QVO with their new lower cost QLC based SSD family.  The 4TB model Allyn reviewed sells for $600, not bad for a drive of that size but still a little pricey for some.  A more affordable option can be seen at The Tech Report, the 1TB drive they reviewed sells for $150.  If you are on a somewhat limited budget and don't mind a small hit in performance nor a three year warranty or 360TB written endurance then this drive is worth a look.

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Samsung's EVO drives have ruled the SATA roost for the last several years. Today, Samsung is introducing high-capacity, lower-cost 860 QVO drives with four-bit-per-cell QLC NAND inside. Can they live up to the high expectations Samsung has set with its past products?"

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage