Remember Conservative Morphological Anti-Aliasing?

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 18, 2019 - 03:13 PM |
Tagged: fxaa, SMAA, Anti-aliasing, MLAA, taa, amd, nvidia

Apart from the new DLSS available on NVIDIA's RTX cards, it has been a very long time since we looked at anti-aliasing implementations and the effects your choice has on performance and visual quality.  You are likely familiar with the four most common implementations, dating back to AMD's MLAA and NVIDIA's FXAA which are not used in new generation games to TAA/TXAA and SMAA but when was the last time you refreshed your memory on what they actually do and how they compare.

Not only did Overclockers Club looking into those, they discuss some of the other attempted implementations as well as sampling types that lie behind these technologies.  Check out their deep dive here.

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"One setting present in many if not all modern PC games that can dramatically impact performance and quality is anti-aliasing and, to be honest, I never really understood how it works. Sure we have the general idea that super-sampling is in effect running at a higher resolution and then downscaling, but then what is multi-sampling? How do post-processing methods work, like the very common FXAA and often favored SMAA?"

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Marseille

Overview

When we first saw product page for the Marseille mCable Gaming Edition, a wave of skepticism waved across the PC Perspective offices. Initially, an HDMI cable that claims to improve image quality while gaming sounds like the snake oil that "audiophile" companies like AudioQuest have been peddling for years. 

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However, looking into some of the more technical details offered by Marseille, their claims seemed to be more and more likely. By using a signal processor embedded inside the HDMI connector itself, Marseille appears to be manipulating the video signal to improve quality in ways applicable to gaming. Specifically, their claim of Anti-Aliasing on all video signals has us interested.

So for curiosities sake, we ordered the $150 mCable Gaming Edition and started to do some experimentation.

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Even from the initial unboxing, there are some unique aspects to the mCable. First, you might notice that the connectors are labeled with "Source" and "TV." Since the mCable has a signal processor in it, this distinction which is normally meaningless starts to matter a great deal.

Similarly, on the "TV" side, there is a USB cable used to power the signal processing chip. Marseille claims that most modern TV's with USB connections will be able to power the mCable.

While a lot of Marseilles marketing materials are based on upgrading the visual fidelity of console games that don't have adjustable image quality settings, we decided to place our aim on a market segment we are intimately familiar with—PC Gaming. Since we could selectively turn off Anti-Aliasing in a given game, and PC games usually implement several types of AA, it seemed like the most interesting testing methodology. 

Continue reading our look at the new Marseille mCable Gaming Edition!!