Wondering about upgrading your cooler mounts for Ryzen?

Subject: General Tech, Motherboards, Cases and Cooling | March 2, 2017 - 02:05 PM |
Tagged: AM4, ryzen, nzxt, fractal design, scythe

We have some good news from several companies about compatibility with that AM4 board you are hoping to set up.  NXZT have announced a program in which you can request a free AM4 mounting kit for your Kraken X62, X52, X42, X61, X41 or Kraken X31.  Just follow this link to apply for one, they will ship world wide starting on the 15th of March.  You will need to provide proof of purchase of both your AM4 motherboard and Kraken cooler.

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Fractal Design have a similar offer for owners of of their Kelvin series of coolers.  You can email their Support team for a bracket for your Kelvin T12, S24 or S36, make sure to attach proof of purchase of either a Ryzen processor or AM4 board.

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Scythe is doing things a litle differently.  If you reside in Europe, they are offering free mounting kits to owners of their Mugen 5 cooler, simply reach out them via this link, again attaching a receipt for the cooler and either a Ryzen CPU or AM4 motherboard.  Owners of a Katana 3 or 4, Kabuto 3, Shuriken Rev. B, Tatsumi “A”, Byakko, or Iori cooler need not even go through that process, your coolers mount is already compatible.  For owners of other coolers you can reach out to Scythe via the previous link to order a bracket for  3,99€, to ship out sometime in May or later.  We will let you know when we hear from the NA branch.

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"Coinciding with the new AMD Zen-based Ryzen CPUs, and the new AM4 socket, NZXT will be providing a free retention bracket for all current Kraken users. NZXT believes in providing high-quality components to our customers, in addition to exceptional customer service no matter where they reside and we will continue that support alongside the launch of Ryzen."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: NZXT

The Scythe FUMA SCFM-1000 may be the next favourite heatsink

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 13, 2017 - 03:24 PM |
Tagged: scythe, FUMA SCFM-1000, air cooler

The new Scythe FUMA model, the SCFM-1000 is a fair sized cooler, not the biggest we've seen recently but at 137x130x149mm and 920g you won't fit it into a SFF build.   It is compatible with all current sockets from AMD and Intel and [H]ard|OCP states it should work with AM4 clip-on mounts, though you may need a mount if your current AMD cooler is attached through the board.  With a pair of 120mm fans the cooler beats out even AIO watercooler and does so extremely quietly.  With a retail price of $46 this cooler deserved a Gold Award and did indeed earn one in the review.

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"Scythe has a history of building CPU air coolers that not only perform well, but are also are a value in terms of your hard earned money. The FUMA cooler is built with the PC hardware enthusiast in mind and sports multiple fan configurations and comes supplied with two fans so you do not have any added cost."

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CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Introduction and Specifications

In this roundup we'll explore the performance of three premium (and large) air coolers - with the ultra-popular Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO in the mix to see how this $29 option stacks up against the big dogs on test.

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Many of the large air coolers on the market are built for ultra-efficient cooling at whisper-quiet volume levels. With massive heatsinks (and sometimes pairs of them) they can often cool demanding CPU loads with minimal fan speeds, and this usually results in very low noise output. Another advantage is the increased thermal headroom such a cooler provides, which can allow for overclocking without the need for liquid cooling - or even much additional noise.

So what coolers are included? In alphabetical order we have:

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Can the $29 Hyper 212 EVO hold its own in this group?

Kicking Cooler Testing up a Notch

I reviewed the Thermalright Le Grand Macho RT recently, using a Core i5 6600K-based test platform (the Scythe Ninja 4 was also reviewed using this platform), and readers correctly pointed out that a cooler of this size should really be tested with some more challenging thermal loads. The Core i5-6600K is a quad-core, single-threaded design with a 91W TDP, and in moving to a new CPU cooler test system I decided to make the jump to the 140W TDPs of Intel's LGA2011 processors.

So I ended up with a Core i7-6800K; a newer Broadwell-E design with a 6 core/12 thread configuration (and of course that 140W TDP). The base speed of the CPU is 3.40 GHz, with a maximum turbo frequency of 3.60 GHz. Without much trouble I was able to push the CPU to 4.0 GHz on each core, and proceeded to test each of these coolers at both stock and OC frequencies. My hope is that the results to follow will adequately demonstrate just how effective these coolers are when really pressed.

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Continue reading our roundup of large CPU air coolers!!

Scythe's Fuma cooler, stocky and quiet but not ready for overclocking contests

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 20, 2016 - 04:12 PM |
Tagged: scythe, fuma, heatsink

Scythe's Fuma heatsink is a fair size at 137x149x130mm with a weight of 920g, including the two 120mm fans, though shorter than many on the market.  That stock design could cause some problems if your RAM has impressively sized heatsinks but for most modules you should not have any issues and it does not impinge on your first PCIe slot.  In the tests Modders-Inc performed reasonably well when cooling an i7-4770k at stock speeds, unfortunately an overclock of 4.4GHz did see the cooler struggle and the CPU frequency was throttled back almost immediately.  For lesser loads the low RPM fans will be able to keep your temperatures reasonable and do so without creating much noise.  If you have a midranged CPU and want a quiet cooler in the $55 range, drop by to check out the full review.

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"Heatsink designs are driven by the fundamental principle that a larger surface area equates to better heat dissipation than a smaller area. Factoring in componential consent, modern aftermarket CPU tower heatsinks had to get creative to compensate and dial-in the efficiency needed, hence the rise of dual-tower cooler designs"

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CASES & COOLING

Source: Modders Inc

Podcast #384 - Corsair Carbide 600Q, GDDR5X, a Dual Fiji Graphics card and more!

Subject: General Tech | January 28, 2016 - 01:38 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, corsair, carbide, 600q, 600c, gddr5x, jdec, amd, Fiji, fury x, fury x2, scythe, Ninja 4, logitech, g502 spectrum, Intel, Tigerlake, nzxt, Manta

PC Perspective Podcast #384 - 01/28/2016

Join us this week as we discuss the Corsair Carbide 600Q, GDDR5X, a Dual Fiji Graphics card and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Manufacturer: Scythe

Introduction and First Impressions

The Scythe Ninja 4 (SCNJ-4000) is the latest model in the Ninja series, and an imposing air cooler with dimensions similar to Noctua's massive NH-D14. But there's more to the story than size, as this is engineered for silence above all else. Read on to see just how quiet it is, and of course how well it's able to cope with CPU loads.

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"The Ninja 4 is the latest model in the Ninja CPU Cooler Series, developed for uncompromising performance. It features the new T-M.A.P.S technology, an optimized alignment of heatpipes, and the back-plate based Hyper Precision Mounting System (H.P.M.S) for firm mounting and easy installation procedure. These improvements and a special, adjustable Glide Stream 120mm PWM fan result in an increased cooling performance while reducing the weight compared to his predecessor. Also the design of the heat-sink allows fan mounting on all four sides. This enables the optimal integration of the Ninja 4 in the air flow of the pc-case and reduces turbulence and the emergence of hotspots."

The Ninja 4 is built around a very large, square heatsink, which allows the single 120 mm fan to be mounted on any side, and this PWM fan offers three speed settings to further control noise. And noise is really what the Ninja is all about, with some really low minimum speeds possible on what is a very quiet Scythe fan to begin with.

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Will a single low-speed fan design affect the ability to keep a CPU cool under stress? Will the Ninja 4's fan spin up and become less quiet under full load? These questions will soon be answered.

Continue reading our review of the Scythe Ninja 4 CPU cooler!!

Meet the new Ninja, Scythe's fourth generation cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | December 7, 2015 - 02:20 PM |
Tagged: scythe, Ninja 4, air cooling

The Scythe Ninja series of coolers have been around for a while and they have recently updated their design with the Ninja 4.  Including the packaged PWM fan the cooler measures 130x155x155mm (5.1x6.1x6.1") and weighs 900g, hopefully not heavy enough to bend your pins.  The cooling performance that Modders-Inc saw was impressive at high speed but even more impressive at the meduim setting which saw temperatures within 3C of the high speed results but with reduced noise generated by the fan.  Keep your eyes out for more on this cooler as it will appear in an upcoming review right here on PCPer.

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"If at first you don't succeed, try, try, try again. Nobody gets things right the first time and even if done well, needs change over time so a revision is almost always guaranteed to happen. It is not about striving for perfection because what that is cannot be a clearly defined point, but it can be approached."

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CASES & COOLING

 

Source: Modders Inc

Run softly and carry a big GPU

Subject: Systems | November 25, 2014 - 03:48 PM |
Tagged: asus, STRIX GTX 980, i5-4670K, scythe, Kotetsu, quiet computing, Z97-PRO

Silent PC Review has put together their recommendations on how you can build a powerful computer which runs very quietly.  The recommended component list certainly lives up to a high powered gaming machine, a STRIX GTX 980, a 3.4GHz i5-4670 and 8GB of DDR3-1866 running on the Asus Z97-PRO.  For cooling they chose an air cooler, specifically the Scythe Kotetsu as in their opinion most of the AIO watercoolers have loud fans on their radiators which defeats the purpose of this build.  The enclosure of choice is the sound dampened Fractal Design Define R4 with a be quiet! Straight Power 10 600W as opposed to a passively cooled PSU as the excess heat would mean the rest of the fans would need to spin faster to dissipate it.  Check out the full article for their alternative suggestions as well as the finished results of the builds. 

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"The first of our quiet gaming build guides for the season is an ATX tower featuring the highly efficient NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980. Join us as we plan, build, and stress test this beast, while trying to keep it quiet enough to satisfy our own high standards. A sneak preview: We managed to keep it under 20 dBA@1m under all test conditions!"

Here are some more Systems articles from around the web:

Systems

Check out the heatpipes on Scythe's Grand Kama Cross 2

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 15, 2013 - 05:39 PM |
Tagged: scythe, Grand Kama Cross 2, heatsink

Scythe have made some uniquely shaped coolers in the past but perhaps not as strange as some of Zalman's designs.  This cooler has a V shape to it with the inner parts of that V being extended up until they touch the cooling fan and to give a bit more surface area for heat to dissipate to.  That could have made the cooler much shorter than other heatsinks if it wasn't for the height of the heatpipes beneath the actual heatsink.  That does give you a lot of clearance for RAM with tall heatspreaders, something many other coolers do not offer.  Check out [H]ard|OCP's review to see if the cooler is as quiet and effective as the advertising claims.

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"Many times in the world of CPU cooling, heatsinks look much the same from one to the next. The Grand Kama Cross 2 caught our eye due to its very unique design and we wanted to see if there was more to it than just aesthetics. The design is somewhat reminiscent of V type engine, but let's see if it has any horsepower to back it up."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Scythe Unveils ACB-TYPE3 Open-Air Acrylic ATX Chassis

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 31, 2012 - 05:29 AM |
Tagged: scythe, open bench, open air case, atx case, acyrilic case

Scythe, a PC enthusiast hardware company popular for its line of fans and processor heatsinks will soon be launching a new open air case. The ACB-TYPE3 is a clear acrylic case that forgoes side panels for an open bench design.

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The case weighs in at under 6 pounds, the case is constructed of 5mm acrylic and can accommodate ATX, Micro-ATX, and Mini-ITX motherboards. Additionally, it features three 5.25” drive bays, three 3.5” hard drive bays, and two 2.5” drive bays suitable for storing SSDs (solid state drives).
Another cool feature is that the open air case can hold tower coolers up to 190mm, which is not quite big enough for the 100W passive TwinBlock cooler but will be good enough for most any other high-end air cooler.

According to FanlessTech, the Scythe acrylic case will be available for purchase soon, and will cost around $85. It certainly seems like a neat option for benchmarking test beds and enthusiast’s that like to show off their computer hardware (nothing wrong with that!). You can find more photos over at the Fanless Tech website.

Source: Fanless Tech