Samsung Responds to Galaxy Note 7 Issue

Subject: Mobile | September 2, 2016 - 10:09 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, galaxy note 7

According to Samsung, there have been 35 reported cases of defective Galaxy Note 7 batteries. In response, they will voluntarily replace all existing Galaxy Note 7 devices “over the coming weeks”. They have also stopped selling the devices, presumably, because they are capable of fixing the devices for existing customers, until the stock can be replaced.


This comes after reports that Galaxy Note 7 phones have been either catching fire or exploding. Some outlets are claiming that Samsung has confirmed 35 cases of fire or explosion, but, unless these outlets have more information than on the public statement, Samsung has only confirmed 35 complaints, and it's possible that other, related issues were included in that tally (like feeling excessively hot).

They did not mention a specific way for Galaxy Note 7 owners to request a replacement in their press release, but their technical support contact information is available here. I assume that they will point you in the right direction.

Source: Samsung

Samsung's 256GB Samsung EVO Plus MicroSD card, for your 4K recording pleasure

Subject: Storage | August 29, 2016 - 08:37 PM |
Tagged: microSD, Samsung, evo plus, U3, UHS-I

A while back Al broke down the specifications of SD cards and what each class meant and the proper usage for them.  The top class is U3 and it offers transfer speeds high enough to support recording 4K video on your devices and that happens to be the rating on the new 256GB Samsung EVO Plus MicroSD.  Legion Hardware just tested this MicroSD card and it now holds the title of best performing SD card they have tested.  The performance does come at a premium, the MSRP of the card is $250 and even with a 10 year warranty this is still an expensive purchase.  If you need the ability to record 4K video immediately this is the fast solution available but if you are still in the planning stages, remember that there is a new standard, UFS, which is due to hit the market soon and impact pricing of older products.


"Running out of storage on your smartphone, tablet or 4K video camera? Well the good news is SD cards have never been more affordable and crucially offered such huge storage capacities. In fact, Samsung recently announced the availability of a 256GB version of their popular EVO Plus MicroSD card series"

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:


Samsung is being a little cagey about their new Z-SSD

Subject: General Tech | August 29, 2016 - 06:27 PM |
Tagged: z-ssd, NVMe, Samsung, HHHL

The Register had a quick chat with Samsung about the Z-SSD they announced at FMS 2016, hoping to get some details from the company about the technology behind the new product, with little success.  We know it will be DRAM-NAND gap-filler such as the one Netlist announced earlier and will be possible competition for Intel's XPoint.  Samsung did confirm that it will be NVMe and will initially launch as a half height, half length PCIe card, with other interfaces to follow.  They did admit it will use 3D V-NAND, but would only hint at the custom circuit design they will use.  The Register offers some prognostication at the end of the quick interview, you can see that right here.


"The mysterious Samsung Z-SSD was announced at the Flash Memory Summit, and positioned as a DRAM-NAND gap-filler. This makes it competition for XPoint. We asked Samsung about it, and here is what we learnt."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

GDDR6's timing will be a little slower than we had hoped

Subject: General Tech | August 26, 2016 - 05:04 PM |
Tagged: gddr6, Samsung, delay

The Inquirer offered some sad news for anyone hoping to see GDDR6 next year as Samsung is now aiming to deliver in 2018.  The specifications remain the same, internal bandwidth topping out at 16Gbps, compared to GDDR5X at 12Gbps.  That will translate to a maximum of 512GBps on a 256-bit memory bus, 786GBps on a 384-bit bus.  Mobile devices will also appreciate the new standard as it should use around 20% less power, good news for those who buy gaming laptops.


"SAMSUNG HAS ANNOUNCED that GDDR6 memory interface technology will be introduced in 2018, not 2017 as was previously expected."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Samsung and SK Hynix Discuss The Future of High Bandwidth Memory (HBM) At Hot Chips 28

Subject: Memory | August 25, 2016 - 06:39 AM |
Tagged: TSV, SK Hynix, Samsung, hot chips, hbm3, hbm

Samsung and SK Hynix were in attendance at the Hot Chips Symposium in Cupertino, California to (among other things) talk about the future of High Bandwidth Memory (HBM). In fact, the companies are working on two new HBM products: HBM3 and an as-yet-unbranded "low cost HBM." HBM3 will replace HBM2 at the high end and is aimed at the HPC and "prosumer" markets while the low cost HBM technology lowers the barrier to entry and is intended to be used in mainstream consumer products.

As currently planned, HBM3 (Samsung refers to its implementation as Extreme HBM) features double the density per layer and at least double the bandwidth of the current HBM2 (which so far is only used in NVIDIA's planned Tesla P100). Specifically, the new memory technology offers up 16Gb (~2GB) per layer and as many as eight (or more) layers can be stacked together using TSVs into a single chip. So far we have seen GPUs use four HBM chips on a single package, and if that holds true with HBM3 and interposer size limits, we may well see future graphics cards with 64GB of memory! Considering the HBM2-based Tesla will have 16 and AMD's HBM-based Fury X cards had 4GB, HBM3 is a sizable jump!

Capacity is not the only benefit though. HBM3 doubles the bandwidth versus HBM2 with 512GB/s (or more) of peak bandwidth per stack! In the theoretical example of a graphics card with 64GB of HBM3 (four stacks), that would be in the range of 2 TB/s of theoretical maximum peak bandwidth! Real world may be less, but still that is many terabytes per second of bandwidth which is exciting because it opens a lot of possibilities for gaming especially as developers push graphics further towards photo realism and resolutions keep increasing. HBM3 should be plenty for awhile as far as keeping the GPU fed with data on the consumer and gaming side of things though I'm sure the HPC market will still crave more bandwidth.

Samsung further claims that HBM3 will operate at similar (~500MHz) clocks to HBM2, but will use "much less" core voltage (HBM2 is 1.2V).

HBM Four Stacked.jpg

Stacked HBM memory on an interposer surrounding a processor. Upcoming HBM technologies will allow memory stacks with double the number of layers.

HBM3 is perhaps the most interesting technologically; however, the "low cost HBM" is exciting in that it will enable HBM to be used in the systems and graphics cards most people purchase. There were less details available on this new lower cost variant, but Samsung did share a few specifics. The low cost HBM will offer up to 200GB/s per stack of peak bandwidth while being much cheaper to produce than current HBM2. In order to reduce the cost of production, their is no buffer die or ECC support and the number of Through Silicon Vias (TSV) connections have been reduced. In order to compensate for the lower number of TSVs, the pin speed has been increased to 3Gbps (versus 2Gbps on HBM2). Interestingly, Samsung would like for low cost HBM to support traditional silicon as well as potentially cheaper organic interposers. According to NVIDIA, TSV formation is the most expensive part of interposer fabrication, so making reductions there (and somewhat making up for it in increased per-connection speeds) makes sense when it comes to a cost-conscious product. It is unclear whether organic interposers will win out here, but it is nice to seem them get a mention and is an alternative worth looking into.

Both high bandwidth and low latency memory technologies are still years away and the designs are subject to change, but so far they are both plans are looking rather promising. I am intrigued by the possibilities and hope to see new products take advantage of the increased performance (and in the latter case lower cost). On the graphics front, HBM3 is way too far out to see a Vega release, but it may come just in time for AMD to incorporate it into its high end Navi GPUs, and by 2020 the battle between GDDR and HBM in the mainstream should be heating up.

What are your thoughts on the proposed HBM technologies?

Source: Ars Technica

IDF 2016: G.Skill Shows Off Low Latency DDR4-3333MHz Memory

Subject: Memory | August 20, 2016 - 05:25 AM |
Tagged: X99, Samsung, ripjaws, overclocking, G.Skill, ddr4, Broadwell-E

Early this week at the Intel Developer Forum in San Francisco, California G.Skill showed off new low latency DDR4 memory modules for desktop and notebooks. The company launched two Trident series DDR4 3333 MHz kits and one Ripjaws branded DDR4 3333 MHz SO-DIMM. While these speeds are not close to the fastest we have seen from them, these modules offer much tighter timings. All of the new memory modules use Samsung 8Gb chips and will be available soon.

On the desktop side of things, G.Skill demonstrated a 128GB (8x16GB) DDR4-3333 kit with CAS latencies of 14-14-14-34 running on a Asus ROG Rampage V Edition 10 motherboard with an Intel Core i7 6800K processor. They also showed a 64GB (8x8GB) kit clocked at 3333 MHz with timings of 13-13-13-33 running on a system with the same i7 6800K and Asus X99 Deluxe II motherboard.

128GB 3333MHz CL14 demo.JPG

G.Skill demonstrating 128GB DDR4-3333 memory kit at IDF 2016.

In addition to the desktop DIMMs, G.Skill showed a 32GB Ripjaws kit (2x16GB) clocked at 3333 MHz running on an Intel Skull Canyon NUC. The SO-DIMM had timings of 16-18-18-43 and ran at 1.35V.

Nowadays lower latency is not quite as important as it once was, but there is still a slight performance advantage to be had tighter timings and pure clockspeed is not the only important RAM metric. Overclocking can get you lower CAS latencies (sometimes at the cost of more voltage), but if you are not into that tedious process and are buying RAM anyway you might as well go for the modules with the lowest latencies out of the box at the clockspeeds you are looking for. I am not sure how popular RAM overclocking is these days outside of benchmark runs and extreme overclockers though to be honest.

Technical Session OC System.JPG

Overclocking Innovation session at IDF 2016.

With regards to extreme overclocking, there was reportedly an "Overclocking Innovation" event at IDF where G.Skill and Asus overclocker Elmor achieved a new CPU overclocking record of 5,731.78 MHz on the i7 6950X running on a system with G.Skill memory and Asus motherboard. The company's DDR4 record of 5,189.2 MHz was not beaten at the event, G.Skill notes in its press release (heh).

Are RAM timings important to you when looking for memory? What are your thoughts on the ever increasing clocks of new DDR4 kits with how overclocking works on the newer processors/motherboards?

Source: G.Skill
Subject: Editorial
Manufacturer: NVIDIA


It always feels a little odd when covering NVIDIA’s quarterly earnings due to how they present their financial calendar.  No, we are not reporting from the future.  Yes, it can be confusing when comparing results and getting your dates mixed up.  Regardless of the date before the earnings, NVIDIA did exceptionally well in a quarter that is typically the second weakest after Q1.

NVIDIA reported revenue of $1.43 billion.  This is a jump from an already strong Q1 where they took in $1.30 billion.  Compare this to the $1.027 billion of its competitor AMD who also provides CPUs as well as GPUs.  NVIDIA sold a lot of GPUs as well as other products.  Their primary money makers were the consumer space GPUs and the professional and compute markets where they have a virtual stranglehold on at the moment.  The company’s GAAP net income is a very respectable $253 million.


The release of the latest Pascal based GPUs were the primary mover for the gains for this latest quarter.  AMD has had a hard time competing with NVIDIA for marketshare.  The older Maxwell based chips performed well against the entire line of AMD offerings and typically did so with better power and heat characteristics.  Even though the GTX 970 was somewhat limited in its memory configuration as compared to the AMD products (3.5 GB + .5 GB vs. a full 4 GB implementation) it was a top seller in its class.  The same could be said for the products up and down the stack.

Pascal was released at the end of May, but the company had been shipping chips to its partners as well as creating the “Founder’s Edition” models to its exacting specifications.  These were strong sellers throughout the end of May until the end of the quarter.  NVIDIA recently unveiled their latest Pascal based Quadro cards, but we do not know how much of an impact those have had on this quarter.  NVIDIA has also been shipping, in very limited quantities, the Tesla P100 based units to select customers and outfits.

Click to read more about NVIDIA's latest quarterly results!

FMS 2016: Samsung To Announce 64-Layer 4th Gen V-NAND, 32TB 2.5" SSD

Subject: Storage | August 10, 2016 - 06:00 PM |
Tagged: 2.5, V-NAND, ssd, Samsung, nand, FMS 2016, FMS, flash, 64-Layer, 32TB, SAS, datacenter

At a huge press event like Flash Memory Summit, being in the right place at the right time (and with the right camera), matters greatly. I'll just let a picture say a thousand words for me here:

64-Layer V-NAND.jpg this picture has been corrected for extreme parallax and was taken in far from ideal conditions, but you get the point. Samsung's keynote is coming up later today, and I have a hunch this will be a big part of what they present. We did know 64-Layer was coming, as it was mentioned in Samsung's last earnings announcement, but confirmation is nice.

*edit* now that the press conference has taken place, here are a few relevant slides:



With 48-Layer V-NAND announced last year (and still rolling out), it's good to see Samsung pushing hard into higher capacity dies. 64-Layer enables 512Gbits (64GB) per die, and 100MB/s per die maximum throughput means even lower capacity SSDs should offer impressive sequentials.


Samsung 48-Layer V-NAND. Pic courtesy of TechInsights.

64-Layer is Samsung's 4th generation of V-NAND. We've seen 48-Layer and 32-Layer, but few know that 24-Layer was a thing (but was mainly in limited enterprise parts).

We will know more shortly, but for now, dream of even higher capacity SSDs :)

*edit* and this just happened:

Photo Aug 10, 10 51 31.jpg

*additional edit* - here's a better picture taken after the keynote:



The 32TB model in their 2.5" form factor displaces last years 16TB model. The drive itself is essentially identical, but the flash packages now contain 64-layer dies, doubling the available capacity of the device.

Mobile speed, the Samsung Portable SSD T3

Subject: Storage | August 9, 2016 - 10:44 PM |
Tagged: ssd t3, Samsung, portable storage

Just because you are on the road there is no reason to subject yourself to HDD speeds when transferring files.  Not only will an SSD be quieter and more resilient but the USB 3.1 Gen 1 Type C port theoretically offers up to 450MB/s transfer speeds.  This particular 2TB portable SSD uses the same MGX controller as the 850 EVO, the NAND is Samsung's 48-layer TLC V-NAND.  The Tech Report previously tried out the T1 model so their expectations were that this drive would improve performance in addition to offering larger sizes of drive.  Does it live up to expectations?  Find out in their full review.

Al just reminded yours truly we posted a review of the T3 back in February.


"Not all new SSDs go inside your computer. We take a quick look at Samsung's latest V-NAND-powered external drive, the Portable SSD T3, to see what it's like to put 2TB of fast storage in one's pocket."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:


Can Netlist use Samsung in their upcoming HybriDIuMM to challenge Intels XPoint?

Subject: General Tech | August 9, 2016 - 06:55 PM |
Tagged: XPoint, Samsung, Intel, HybriDIMM

Bit of a correction folks, Netlist developed the HybriDIMMs using Samsung DRAM and NAND, united using their own proprietary interface. This, and my confusion, is in part to do some nasty and very costly IP litigation behind the scenes which lead to Samsung getting more credit for this than they deserved. 

Netlist and Diablo Technologies worked together for a while and then parted ways.  Soon after the split Diablo licensed SMART to produce ULLtraDIMMs and a court case was born. Not long afterwards SanDisk grabbed the IP from Diablo and now WD is buying SanDisk, making this an utter nightmare for a smaller company.  Samsung invested $23m in Netdisk and offered  a source of chips, albeit likely with strings, which has allowed Netdisk to develop HybriDIMMs. 

Samsung Netlist has developed HybriDIMMs, replacing some of the DRAM on a memory module with NAND.  This allows you to significantly increase the amount of memory available on a DIMM and reduces the price dramatically at the same time.  The drawback is that NAND is significantly slower than DRAM; they intend to overcome that with the use of predictive algorithms they have called PreSight to pre-fetch data from the NAND and stage it in DRAM.  This will compete with Intel's Optane XPoint DIMMs once they are released and will mean the DRAM market will split into two, the DRAM we are currently used to and these hybrid NAND DIMMs.  Check out more details over at The Register.


"Gold plate can give a durable and affordable alloy a 24-carat veneer finish, adding value to cheap metal. DRAM gives Samsung-Netlist Hybrid DIMMs a cache veneer, providing what looks like DRAM to applications but is really persistent NAND underneath, cheaper than DRAM and lots of it."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register