Hey influencers, RTFM

Subject: General Tech | April 18, 2019 - 12:28 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, foldable, Galaxy Fold

In today's world people are far more likely to listen to someone who is famous on one or more platform than to an expert in the topic of discussion.  The dead and dying Samsung Fold phones being sent to influencers is a perfect example of this, as these somewhat famous social media stars have been ignoring the instructions and removing a protective film from the screen.  Samsung was quite clear in their manual that this film is necessary to prevent the foldable screen from dying, as one of the quotes over at Ars makes quite obvious, "The phone comes with this protective layer/film. Samsung says you are not supposed to remove it. I removed it ...".

When dealing with a brand new and possibly not quite ready for prime time technology, such as a foldable phone, perhaps it is worth spending the time taking a look at the manual or listening to someone who knows about the subject, rather than only listening to someone you 'know'?

rtfm.jpg

"YouTuber Marques Brownlee also tried peeling off this protective layer, thinking it was just a display protector for shipping. After picking at the layout a bit, Brownlee says "the display spazzed and blacked out. Started over with a replacement."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Ars Technica

Flashbolt! Ah-ah! King of the impossible

Subject: General Tech | March 22, 2019 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: flashbolt, Samsung, HBM2, HBM2E, aquabolt, flarebolt

Last year Samsung released Aquabolt, their HB2 modules which offered 2.4 Gbps per pin data transfer rates at 1.2V, rather impressive since the specification stated 2.0Gbps per pin was the top transfer rate.  Today they announced the next generation, Flashbolt which uses HBM2E and unlike certain other standards which recently bolted an E onto the end of their name this offers an actual improvement.

To make sure it you are confused this Friday, the new chips are rated for 410GB/s of bandwidth and 16GB of capacity; go yell at The Inquirer but it isn't a mistake.  To put it more helpfully, HBM2E can accommodate 16Gb per die, with transfer rates of 3.2Gbps per pin.  That is an immense amount of bandwidth for GPUs and HPC cards, though we won't be seeing any products in the near future nor are you likely to be able to insert it into your system any time soon.  AMD adopted a winning technology first, but as often seems to be the case, perhaps they moved a little too early.

samsung-hbm2-8-go-memoire_02C101BA01651554.jpg

"The name follows the same conventions as Samsung's previous memory products, Aquabolt and Flarebolt, but relies on a radically different architecture: HBM2E can accommodate 16Gb per die, twice as much as HBM2 used in Aquabolt, and offer transfer rates of 3.2Gbps per pin."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register

Samsung is rolling out eMRAM for the IoT

Subject: General Tech | March 11, 2019 - 01:16 PM |
Tagged: everspin, eMRAM, Samsung, iot, Optane

Embedded magnetic RAM has been around for a bit, usually thanks to the work of Everspin whom have licensed their technology to GLOBALFOUNDRIES, though today Samsung has announced they are developing their own.  It is less expensive to produce than STT-RAM, PC-RAM or memristors yet offers many of the same advantages over flash memory, namely much higher performance and lower electrical requirements.  

Samsung is a ways from production, according to The Register Samsung doesn't expect to tape out a 1Gb eMRAM test chip until later this year.  This would be a big leap forward for the performance of embedded systems, as ARM is working with Samsung to ensure compatibility and we may even see eMRAM onboard ARM chips once Samsung's production lines ramp up.  It will be interesting to see what effect this will have on the market once it arrives; hopefully a larger splash than a certain other type of non-volitile memory!

samsung_news_05.jpg

"Samsung this week claimed it is mass-producing and commercially shipping embedded magnetic RAM (eMRAM) to replace EEPROM, SRAM, and NAND memories in embedded electronics."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Samsung Mass Producing eUFS 3.0 Mobile Storage

Subject: General Tech | March 5, 2019 - 11:05 AM |
Tagged: V-NAND, smartphone, Samsung, eUFS

Samsung has begun mass production of its latest V-NAND based mobile storage solution. Conforming to the eUFS 3.0 standard, Samsung’s latest chips pair eight layers of 512Gb dies with a high-performance controller into a tiny 512 GB chip suitable for thin phones and tablets.

eUFS_512GB USB3.0_Ver_ A.jpg

Samsung claims its eUFS (embedded Universal Flash Storage) 3.0 chips offer up to twice the sequential performance of previous generation eUFS 2.1 storage and 20-times the performance of a typical micro SD card (~100 IOPS though some are faster). Specifically, the 512GB eUFS 3.0 chip offers up to 2,100 MB/s sequential read, 410 MB/s sequential write, 63,000 random read, and 68,000 random write speeds. The chart below compares eUFS 3.0, eUFS 2.1, eMMC 5.1, and a M.2 NVMe SSD.

  Samsung eUFS 3.0 Samsung 1TB eUFS 2.1 Samsung 512GB eUFS 2.0 MyDigitalSSD SBX M.2 NVMe eMMC 5.1
Sequential Read 2,100 MB/s 1,000 MB/s 860 MB/s 1,600 MB/s 250 MB/s
Sequential Write 410 MB/s 260 MB/s 255 MB/s 1,300 MB/s 125 MB/s
Random Read IOPS 63,000 58,000 42,000 240,000+ 11,000
Random Write IOPS 68,000 50,000 40,000 180,000+ 13,000

eUFS 3.0, eUFS 2.1, and eMMC 5.1 numbers courtesy Samsung. NVME PCI-E x2 SSD numbers are from PC Perspective in our review of the drive. For further comparison typical modern SATA SSD tend to be around 550 MB/s for sequentials and 95,000 IOPS.

Smartphone and tablets utilizing eUFS 3.0 should end up being notably faster than previous storage solutions. Interestingly, Samsung has managed to pull off sequential read performance that rivals much larger multi-chip NVME PCI-E x2 M.2 solid state drives though writes do not come close to those drives due to the number of chips/channels being much higher on the M.2 form factor whereas the eUFS 3.0 is limited to a single chip and limited layers to spread writes across. Random read and write performance is respectable with eUFS 3.0 but again not anywhere close to PCI-E/NVMe M.2 drives. Compared to a SATA SSD however, eUFS 3.0 looks much better offering significantly faster sequential reads (writes are fairly low to be competitive though) and with random performance that starts to approach budget and/or low capacity SATA SSD performance. That’s not to say computer users should give up M.2 for eUFS, of course, but that smartphone storage is rapidly improving and starting to close the gap between the platforms / form factors.

Samsung will be launching 512 GB and 128 GB eUFS 3.0 chips imminently with 1 TB and 256 GB chips to follow in the second half of 2019. We may have to wait until next year to see the new eUFS 3.0 standard catch on with most smartphones launching in 2019 already announced last month at Mobile World Congress. It is possible that some of those phones will use the faster internal storage, like Samsung’s own Galaxy Fold, but most will likely be based on eUFS 2.1.

Related reading:

Source: Samsung

Samsung Announces Galaxy Smartphone Lineup for 2019

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | March 2, 2019 - 11:00 AM |
Tagged: MWC, snapdragon 855, SD855, Samsung, galaxy, foldable, android 9

During Samsung's own Samsung's Unpacked press conference as well as Mobile World Congress in Spain the Sourth Korea-based tech giant unveiled a beaucoup of new smartphones, tablets, and accessories. The new Galaxy series smartphones were the headliners though with Samsung revealing a new flagship foldable smartphone at the top, four high-end S10 tier phones, and two budget A tier smartphones all within the Galaxy brand. Needless to say, it is a lot to process!

Samsung Galaxy Fold.png

The Samsung Galaxy Fold is the new Galaxy flagship and is Samsung's first smartphone with a foldable AMOLED display [Video]. At first blush the new device is a thck bar of soap with rounded edges, a USB-C port along the bottom edge, and a camera bump around back with three lenses. A 4.6" full HD display sits in the center of the front face with a 10MP selfie camera and large bezels top and bottom. The right side is where the magic happens though, where the smartphone can be opened up like a book to reveal a larger 7.3" dynamic AMOLED display (QXGA) where it can be used like a tablet with up to three applications running at once in separate windows. Samsung claims that "app continuity" allows apps to switch between the cover display and the main tablet display with ease. When the 2-in-1 device is opened up in tablet mode there are two front facing selfie cameras (10MP dual pixel + 8MP RGB depth camera). Around back there are three cameras including a 12MP wide angle, 16MP ulta wide angle, and 12MP telephoto camera. The camera system offers dual optical image stabilization as well.

Samsung Galaxy Fold Cover and Rear Camera.png

On the inside Samsung has opted for Qualcomm's Snaptdragon 855 platform paired with 12GB of LPDDR4x memory and 512GB of storage. Unfortunately there is no micro SD card support on the Galaxy Fold, but at least the internal memory is UFS 3.0 rather than the older (and slower) UFS 2.1 used in the rest of the Galaxy series. Two batteries (one in each half to balance the weight) add up to 4,380 mAh.

Samsung's new flagship comes at quite a premium though, with MSRP of $1980. It should be available starting in April 2019.

Moving down to the (slightly) more affordable S tier, Samsung has refreshed the Galaxy S series with four new devices: the S10+ at $999, the S10 at $899, and the entry-level S10e at $749. There is also the S10 5G that includes the optional X50 modem to all the largest S10 to connect to upcoming 5G cellular networks.

Samsung Galaxy S10e, S10, S10Plus.jpg

The Galaxy S10+ offers a 6.4" Infinity-O edge QHD+ AMOLED display sans notch with a 10MP dual pixel camera and 8MP RGB depth camera in the top right corner of the display in a slim body with rounded corners. Around back, the S10+ features a triple camera system with a wide angle, ultra wide angle, and telephoto lens with 2x optical zoom and dual OIS. The S10+ comes with glass display and either a glass back or a ceramic back with the ceramic variant weighing slightly more but, at least in theory, being much more durable.

The S10+ comes in Prism White, Prism Black, Prism Green, Prism Blue, Ceramic White, and Ceramic Black. The glass backs' prism colors have a glossy pearlescent look while the ceramic models are more solid and matte.

Internally, the S10+ uses a Snapdragon 855 SoC, 4,100mAh battery, and comes in configurations of 8GB RAM / 128GB ROM, 8GB RAM / 512GB ROM, and 12GB RAM / 1TB ROM. Yes, that's 1TB of internal memory on a phone – and it can be expanded with a Micro SD card officially up to 512GB.

  S10e S10 S10+ S10 5G Fold
Display 5.8" Flat FHD (2280x1080) 6.1" Edge QHD+ (3040x1440) 6.4" Edge QHD+ (3040x1440) 6.7" QHD+ 4.6" (FHD) - 7.3" (QXGA)
Cameras

Front: 10MP dual pixel AF

Rear:12MP wide 77° FOV + 16MP 123° ultra wide angle

OIS

Front: 10MP dual pixel AF

Rear:12MP wide 77° FOV + 16MP 123° ultra wide angle + 12MP telephoto 45° (2x optical zoom)
Dual OIS

Front: 10MP dual pixel + 8MP RGB depth

Rear:12MP wide 77° FOV + 16MP 123° ultra wide angle + 12MP telephoto 45° (2x optical zoom)
Dual OIS

 

Front: 10MP dual pixel + 8MP RGB depth

Rear:12MP wide 77° FOV + 16MP 123° ultra wide angle + 12MP telephoto 45° (2x optical zoom) + 3D depth sense camera (ToF sensor)
Dual OIS

Cover: 10MB

Front: 10MP dual pixel + 8MP RGB depth

Rear:12MP wide 77° FOV + 16MP 123° ultra wide angle + 12MP telephoto 45° (2x optical zoom)
Dual OIS

CPU SD855 SD855 SD855 SD855 + X50 SD855
RAM 6GB / 8GB 8GB 8GB / 8GB / 12GB 8GB 12GB LPDDR4x
Storage 128GB / 256GB 128GB / 512GB 128GB / 512GB / 1TB 256GB 512GB
mSD Yes Yes Yes N/A N/A
Battery 3,100 mAh 3,400 mAh 4,100 mAh 4,500 mAh 4,380 mAh
Dimensions 142.2 x 69.9 x 7.9 mm 149.9 x 70.4 x 7.8 mm 57.6 x 74.1 x 7.8 mm 162.6 x 77.1 x 7.94 mm ?
Weight 150 g 157 g 175 g (glass) or 175 g (ceramic) 198 g ?
Price $749 $899 $999 $? $1980

Stepping down to the standard S10 model gets you a slightly small phone with a similar quality edge QHD+ AMOLED display albeit at 6.1". There is only one front facing camera here though, with the depth sensor being removed and only the 10MP dual pixel camera remaining. Bokeh effects in selfie portraits are still possible, but using the NPU to simulate it rather than doing it in hardware. Around back, the S10 matches the triple camera system of the S10+ model so you are not losing anything there. The smaller phone is also lighter at 157 grams vs 175+ on the S10+ and it comes in the same Prism color options sans the ceramics.

You lose some battery going with the smaller S10 though at just 3,400 mAh as well as hardware specifications with the smartphone maxing out at 8GB of RAM and either 128GB or 512GB of UFS 2.1 storage.

Samsung also introduced the S10e which is a new entry level tier to the Galaxy S series that gets you most of the features at a more affordable (for today's smartphones anyway) price with some compromises. The S10e is the smallest and lightest of the bunch and offers a 5.8" flat full HD+ display that is still Infinity-O Dynamic AMOLED and HDR10+ certified like the higher end models but is flat rather than curved. There is a single front-facing 10MP camera in the top right corner of the display and a dual camera system on the back of the phone which includes a 12MP wide angle and a 16MP ultra wide angle lens. There is no telephoto lens for optical zoom and the optical image stabilization is also of lower caliber. While the higher-end S10 and S10+ have ultrasonic fingerprint sensors embedded in the display, the budget S10e opts for an optical fingerprint reader integrated into the side power button which is not the end of the world so long as it's fast.

Specifications wise, the S10e retains the Snapdragon 855 (or Exynos 9820 depending on market) of the rest of the S series but RAM and storage options are limited to 6GB / 128GB or 8GB / 256GB respectively though there is still a micro SD card slot. You also lose a bit of battery at just 3,100 mAh but the loss is not as big as the gap between the S10 and S10+.

The S10+ comes in all of the same glossy Prism color as well as a Canary Yellow option with not all regions getting the same colors (if you want the yellow version you'll need to import it in the US, for example). The prism colors have a pearlescent look while the Canary Yellow is a solid flat but bright color.

According to Samsung, the various S10 models (which are all also IP68 rated) are the first smartphones with HDR10+ and Wi-Fi 6 certifications. The Snapdragon 855 offers 29% more CPU and 37% GPU performance versus last year's Galaxy S9. Samsung is using an intelligent battery algorithm to improve battery life by up to 25% by analyzing how you use apps and reducing CPU usage accordingly. The phones support wireless charging (Fast Wireless Charging 2.0) as well as reverse wireless charging with Powershare to charge other Qi devices (like the new Samsung Galaxy Buds (video), but that's a different story). All the S10 smartphones reportedly offer displays that can get very bright (850 to 1250+ nits) which should help a ton when trying to use it outdoors on sunny days. Other interesting tidbits of information that have come out include a heart rate/oxygen sensor on the back of the S10 and S10+, the S10+ (and only the plus version) using heat pipe / vapor cooling, and the ability to (finally) remap the Bixby button coming soon (for the S10 and older Galaxy devices).

The S10e, S10, and S10+ are slated for US availability on March 8th, with the Galaxy Fold coming sometime in April and the S10 5G making its debut over the summer.

Engadget got hands-on with the S10 5G at MWC 2019 on a test 5G network.

Samsung also showed off the "Galaxy S10 5G" which is an even larger Galaxy phone with a 6.7" display. The company did not reveal as much information about this 5G capable devices as it did about the others, but it is a bit of an odd duck. It has the same front facing camera setup and the rear camera system has been beefed up with a fourth sensor: a Time of Flight sensor that allows for more realistic depth of field as well as adjustable bokeh effects when recording video and taking portraits.

The S10 5G gets the Snapdragon 855 and the X50 modem along with a larger 4,500 mAh battery, but storage has been limited to 8GB of RAM and 256GB of storage. There is no microSD card support on this model.

Pricing and available colors are still an unknown though it is expected to launch this summer in the US.

Left: The Galaxy A30. Right: the Galaxy A50. (Image Credit: Samsung)

Finally, it is worth also mentioning that Samsung also announced two budget A tier Galaxy phones with the Galaxy A30 and Galaxy A50. These cheaper Galaxy devices use Samsung's notched Infinity-U displays at 6.4" (2340x1080 resolution) and a "3D Glasstic" body construction. The A50 gets a 25MP + 8MP ultra-wide + depth camera in back along with a single 25MP front camera while the A30 only have a dual rear camera system (16MP + 5MP wide angle) and a 16MP front camera. The Galaxy A50 is powered by an Exynos 9610 SoC, Mali G72 GPU, and either 4GB RAM / 64GB storage or 6GB RAM / 128GB storage. It uses a 4,000 mAh battery. The A50 will come in black, white, blue, and coral colors. Meanwhile the Galaxy A30 steps things down to a Exynos 7885 Octa and Mali-G71 GPU along with 3GB RAM / 32GB ROM or 4GB RAM / 64GB ROM. It will be available in black, white, or blue. While the A50 has an in-display fingerprint reader, the A30's fingerprint reader is mounted on the back of the phone. The A series is also IP68 dust and water resistant like its more expensive S siblings. These budget phones which are primarily going to launch in non-US markets (e.g. India, China, et al) are expected to be available in Q1.

What are your thoughts on Samsung's 2019 lineup? I think they did some interesting things and while I'm not sold on the Galaxy Fold (the front/cover display bezels are a bit much especially on an almost $2,000 phone!), I am looking forward to the reviews on the S10+ and the S10 5G with the video recording and photo/camera improvements they've made along with things like the laser cutout for the front cameras eliminating the need for a notch and the ultrasonic in-display fingerprint sensor (though I think I would still prefer the rear mounted sensor like my V30 has as the positioning seems more natural than at the bottom of the front face). The battery AI sounds cool, but how useful it will be in practice remains to be seen. If the reports of the much brighter displays is true though, that's going to be pretty huge as viewing OLED in direct sunlight is a pain.

Source:

PC Perspective Podcast #530 - New NVMe SSDs, RTX 2060 Overclocking, and AMD Q4 Earnings

Subject: General Tech | February 1, 2019 - 08:50 AM |
Tagged: wd black, W-3175X, TSMC, ssd, SFX, seasonic, samsung 970 evo, Samsung, RTX 2060, radeon vii, quarterly earnings, overclocking, NVMe, gtx 1660 ti, cooler master, benchmarks, podcast

PC Perspective Podcast #530 - 1/30/2019

This week on the show, we have reviews of two power supplies, two new NVMe SSDs from Samsung and Western Digital, a look at a new low-profile keyboard from Cooler Master, more RTX 2060 benchmarks and overclocking, Radeon VII rumors and leaked benchmarks, AMD's Q4 earnings, and more!

Subscribe to the PC Perspective Podcast

Check out previous podcast episodes: http://pcper.com/podcast

Show Topics
00:02:30 - Review: Seasonic SGX-650 PSU
00:04:13 - Review: Cooler Master MWE Gold 750W PSU
00:05:21 - Review: WD Black SN750 NVMe SSD
00:10:33 - Review: Samsung 970 EVO Plus NVMe SSD
00:18:18 - Review: Cooler Master SK630 Low Profile Keyboard
00:21:42 - Review: RTX 2060 1440p & Overclocking Benchmarks
00:27:57 - News: Trouble at TSMC?
00:31:00 - News: AMD Gonzalo APU & Next-Gen Console Specs
00:39:47 - News: Radeon VII Rumors & Benchmarks
00:44:15 - News: GTX 1660 Ti Rumors
00:46:50 - News: Samsung OLED Displays for Notebooks
00:50:14 - News: Backblaze HDD Longevity Report
00:52:44 - News: Intel 28-Core Xeon W-3175X
00:58:41 - News: Samsung 1TB eUFS Chip for Smartphones
01:01:56 - News: AMD Q4 Earnings
01:13:48 - Picks of the Week
01:20:59 - Outro

Picks of the Week
Jim: 36 Bottles of NyQuil
Jeremy: Legend of Zelda Total Conversion for Doom
Josh: Kindle Paperwhite
Sebastian: ShutUp10

Today's Podcast Hosts
Sebastian Peak
Josh Walrath
Jeremy Hellstrom
Jim Tanous

He's got the whole world (wide web) in his phone

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | January 30, 2019 - 12:40 PM |
Tagged: Terabyte, Samsung, eUFS, 1TB, smartphones

Samsung wants to make sure you don't run out of space on your phone by upping their game and providing 1TB of embedded Universal Flash Storage on a single chip.  The new chip is physically similar to the current 512GB version, so you won't have to buy a phablet to download all your 4K cat videos for offline viewing.  They have also increased speeds at the same time, as we have become accustomed to with other flash storage, with Ars Technica reporting sequential reads of up to 1,000Mbps

Rumour has it we might see this as a choice in the upcoming Galaxy S10.

YH1xBez.gif

"The 1TB eUFS is expected to play a critical role in bringing a more notebook-like user experience to the next generation of mobile devices," said Cheol Choi, executive vice president of Memory Sales and Marketing at Samsung."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Ars Technica

Samsung Begins Mass Production of 15.6-inch UHD OLED Panel in February

Subject: Displays | January 23, 2019 - 12:19 PM |
Tagged: UHD, Samsung, oled, notebook, mass production, laptop, displays, 4k, 15.6 inch

Samsung Display has announced development of a 15.6-inch 3840 x 2160 OLED display panel which they are calling "the world’s first UHD display for the notebook/laptop market". And mass production of the panel will begin in mid-February, "initially for use in premium notebooks produced by leading manufacturers".

Samsung_Display_UHD_15.6_OLED.jpg

"The new OLED panel, as unveiled by Samsung Display, is equipped with a wide range of cutting-edge functionality including a contrast ratio of exceptional quality, as well as extreme color accuracy, full HDR compatibility, a very wide color gamut, and remarkable outdoor visibility, all of which are considered essential specifications for tomorrow’s premium notebooks.

The new panel features a brightness level ranging from 0.0005 to 600 nits, and a dynamic contrast ratio of 120,000:1. Compared to LCDs, black color appears 200 times darker and whites twice as bright, maximizing the benefits of HDR to deliver the utmost in high-resolution video and images.

The new display provides a spectrum of 3.4 million colors (double that of similarly sized LCD panels), which allows for truly life-like images, with colors meeting the DCI (Digital Cinema Initiatives)-P3 standard, the specification best suited for video streaming. The 15.6-inch UHD panel is designed to keep the complete DCI-P3 color gamut fully intact while emitting significantly less blue wavelengths that can potentially be harmful to the eye, making images easier to view even after prolonged use."

Based on the mention of "a dynamic contrast ratio of 120,000:1" I have to wonder if this panel will function differently from OLED screens which as emissive displays have a black level of zero, and thus offer virtually infinite contrast (though "dynamic contrast" is an effect in the control panel of LG OLEDs, for instance). For a practical implementation of a technology that has been criticized in use as a computer monitor it will be interesting to see what - if any - concessions have been made to adapt OLED for use with laptops beyond what we initially saw from Lenovo with the X1 Yoga's OLED option.

For more about this new panel you can read the full press release available here.

Samsung's new 970 EVO is almost double Plus good

Subject: Storage | January 22, 2019 - 03:27 PM |
Tagged: storage, ssd, Samsung, NVMe, M.2 2280, M.2, IOPS, EVO, 970 EVO, 3d nand

Jim was not the only one who completed benchmarking Samsung's new 970 EVO Plus, The Tech Report also chewed on the new gum stick for a while.  Whereas we had the 1TB model, it was the 500GB model which they reviewed and while many of the specifications are the same there are some slight differences worth investigating.  Their custom RoboBench tests real performance and shows just how impressive this drives performance is.  Not only is this drive faster than the previous generations, the price is also much more attractive as we are supposed to see this 500GB drive sell for $130 and the 1TB for $250; let's hope that is the case!

samsung-970-evo-plus-front.jpg

"Samsung's 900-series EVO drives have been mainstays since NVMe went mainstream. The company has released a newly refreshed version of the 970 EVO that's so good they gave it a "Plus" suffix. We take it apart to see if it's as good as it sounds."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Author:
Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Samsung

Samsung today is launching a new member of its consumer-targeted family of NVMe SSDs, the Samsung 970 EVO Plus. Thanks to the upgrade from 64-layer to 96-layer V-NAND, this new drive promises significantly better write performance, a slight bump to overall responsiveness, and improved efficiency all in the same single-sided package at capacities up to 2TB.

samsung-970-evo-plus-box.jpg

This new drive, a mid-cycle refresh that keeps the well-regarded 970-series on the market, looks impressive on paper. But do those soaring advertised IOPS and insane write speeds hold up in reality? Check out our initial review of the Samsung 970 EVO Plus.