Podcast #509 - Threadripper 2950X/2990WX, Multiple QLC SSDs, and more!

Subject: General Tech | August 16, 2018 - 03:16 PM |
Tagged: xeon, video, Turning, Threadripper, ssd, Samsung, QLC, podcast, PA32UC, nvidia, nand, L1TF, Intel, DOOM Eternal, asus, amd, 660p, 2990wx, 2950x

PC Perspective Podcast #509 - 08/16/18

Join us this week for discussion on Modded Thinkpads, EVGA SuperNOVA PSUs, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano

Peanut Gallery: Ken Addison, Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:35:10

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. There is no 3
  2. Week in Review:
  3. News items of interest:
  4. Other stuff
  5. Picks of the Week:
  6. Closing/outro
 
 
Source:
Author:
Subject: Editorial
Manufacturer: ARM

Aggressively Pursuing New Markets

ARM has had a pretty fascinating history, but for most of its time on this Earth it has not been a very public facing company. After the release of the iPhone and ARM’s dominance in the mobile market, they decided to push their PR efforts up a few notches. Now we finally were able to see some of the inner workings of a company that was once a little known low power CPU designer that licensed cores out to third parties.

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The company was not always as aggressive as what we are seeing now. The mobile space for a long time was dominated by multiple architectures that all have eventually faded away. ARM held steady with design improvements and good customer relations that ensured that they would continue into the future. After the release of the original iPhone, the world changed. Happily for us, ARM changed as well. In previous years ARM would announce products, but they would be at least three years away and few people took notice of what they were up to. I originally started paying attention to ARM as I thought that their cores might have the ability to power mobile gaming and perhaps be integrated into future consoles so that there would be a unified architecture that these providers could lean upon. This was back when the 3DS and PSP were still selling millions of units.

This of course never came to pass as I had expected it to, but at least ARM did make it into the Nintendo Switch. ARM worked hard to quickly put faster, more efficient parts out the door. They also went on a buying spree and acquired several graphics startups that would eventually contribute to the now quite formidable Mali GPU family of products. Today we have an extensive lineup of parts that can be bundled into a tremendous amount of configurations. ARM has a virtual monopoly in the cellphone market because they have been willing to work with anyone who wants to license their designs, technologies, and architectures. This is actually a relatively healthy “monopoly” because the partners do the work to mix and match features to provide unique products to the marketplace. Architectural licensees like Apple, Qualcomm, and Samsung all differentiate their products as well and provide direct competition to the ARM designed cores that are licensed to other players.

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Today we are seeing a new direction from ARM that has never been officially explored. We have been given a roadmap of the next two generations of products from the company that are intended to compete in not only the cellphone market, but also in the laptop market. ARM has thrown down the gauntlet and their sights are set on Intel and AMD. Not only is ARM showing us the codenames for these products, but also the relative performance.

Click here to read the entire ARM Roadmap Editorial!

Samsung Begins Mass Production of QLC SATA SSDs for Consumers

Subject: General Tech | August 9, 2018 - 11:10 PM |
Tagged: V-NAND, sata ssd, Samsung, QLC, enterprise ssd

Earlier this week Samsung announced that it has begun mass production on its first consumer solid state drive based on QLC (4 bits per cell) V-NAND. According to the company, the initial drives will offer 4TB capacities and deliver equivalent performance to Samsung’s TLC offerings along with a three year warranty.

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Samsung claims that its fourth generation V-NAND flash in QLC mode (with 16 voltage states) with 64 layers is able to offer up to 1Tb per chip. The 4TB SATA SSD uses a 3-bit SSD controller, TurboWrite technology, and 32 1Tb QLC V-NAND chips and thanks to the write cache (running the V-NAND in SLC or MLC modes) Samsung is able to wring extra performance out of the drive though it’s obviously limited ultimately by the SATA interface. Specifically, Samsung is promising sequential reads of 540 MB/s and sequential writes of up to 520 MB/s with the new QLC SSD. For comparison, Samsung’s fourth generation V-NAND operating in TLC mode is able to offer up to 256Gb and 512Gb capacities depending on package. Moving to fifth generation V-NAND in TLC mode Samsung is offering 256Gb per chip capacities (using 96 layers). Scouring the internet, it appears that Samsung has yet to reveal what it expects to achieve from 5th generation V-NAND in QLC mode. It should be able to at least match the 1Tb of 4th generation QLC V-NAND with the improved performance and efficiencies of the newer generation (including the faster Toggle DDR 4.0 interface) though I would guess Samsung could get more, maybe topping out at as much as 1.5Tb (eventually and if they use 96 layers--I was finding conflicting info on this). In any event, for futher comparison, Intel and Micron have been able to get 1Tb QLC 3D NAND flash chips and Western Digital and Toshiba are working on 96 Layer BiCS4 which is expected to offer up to 1.33Tb capacities when run in 4-bits per cell mode (QLC).

It seems that Samsung is playing a bit of catch up when it comes to solid state storage using QLC though they do still have a bit of time to launch products this year along with the other players. Samsung claims that it will launch its 4TB 2.5” consumer SSD first with 1TB and 2TB models to follow later this year.

Interestingly (and more vaguely), Samsung mentioned in its press release that it plans to begin rolling out M.2 SSDs for the enterprise market and that it will begin mass producing fifth generation 4-bit V-NAND later this year.

I am looking forward to more details on Samsung’s plans for QLC and especially on the specifications of fifth generation 4-bit V-NAND and the drives that it will enable for both consumer systems and the data center markets.

What are your thoughts on Samsung’s QLC V-NAND?

Also read:

Source: Samsung

Your Android may suffer a Meltdown

Subject: General Tech | August 8, 2018 - 02:19 PM |
Tagged: Android, galaxy s7, Samsung, security, meltdown

Researchers in Austria have found a way to utilize Meltdown to hack Galaxy S7 smartphones, a bad sign for security.  It was previously discovered that ARM's Cortex A75 was susceptible to the vulnerability but this is the first time we have seen this exploit successfully used on a Snapdragon 820 or Exynos 8890 chipset.  Even better is that these researchers have discovered variants which can affect older chipsets, meaning that far more phones may be vulnerable than we ever imagined.  You can take a peek over at The Inquirer, if you are looking to ruin your day.

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"IF YOU LIVE IN THE PAST then best pick your ears up as researchers have found Samsung's Galaxy S7 is vulnerable to hacking due to a chip security flaw."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

64 layers of EVOlutionary growth from Samsung

Subject: Storage | August 2, 2018 - 04:24 PM |
Tagged: 860 evo, Samsung, sata, ssd, 64-layer TLC

Samsung have updated their popular SATA SSD series with 64-layer TLC and The Tech Report takes a look at it here.   As you may remember from Al's review back in January, the drive did not show real improvements over the 850 EVO and was occasionally slower at certain tasks.  It has been a while, so has the performance changed over time?  Find out in the full review.

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"Samsung has replaced the longtime reigning champion of the mainstream SSD market. We test out the 860 EVO to see whether doubling V-NAND layers doubles the fun."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

 

The whole DRAM market is changing

Subject: General Tech | July 26, 2018 - 12:58 PM |
Tagged: SK Hynix, Samsung, micron, DRAM

According to this story out of DigiTimes we may finally be hitting peak DRAM demand and that supplies and prices may start to decline.  This seems somewhat counter intuitive, the drop in sales of smartphones and cryptomining will reduce the demand somewhat but we should expect to see a surge in demand from auto manufacturers as our cars become more and more complex ... and possibly intelligent.  The counterpoint would be the maturation of current process tech and the numerous plants coming online over the next year or so.  Samsung, Micron, SK Hynix, Innotron and even Jin Hua will be facing a lot of changes over the coming months.  Let us hope part of the changes are a downwards trend in price.

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"Samsung Electronics and SK Hynix would be forced to overhaul their current profit-oriented business strategy as both firms believe that the booming memory market, which has continued for 2-3 years, is likely to be over by the end of 2018, according to a Korea-based Digital Times report."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: DigiTimes

Notice a big data bill and a bunch of the photos on your Samsung device are now all over the internet?

Subject: General Tech | June 29, 2018 - 04:31 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, samsung messenger, oops

The newer models of Samsung mobile devices feature an interesting ability, they can send your entire gallery of pictures to contacts on your Samsung Messenger app, without your knowledge or consent.  Samsung has yet to admit there is an error, let alone release a fix for this new feature but The Inquirer offers you a workaround.  In the settings of your Samsung Messenger app, disable the apps ability to access your phone's storage; this will prevent you from sending pictures you intended to send but it is probably best for everyone if you do this until a fix is release.

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"The Samsung Galaxy S9, Galaxy S9+ and Note 8 have all shown evidence of the glitch, which is causing the Samsung Messages app to send photos - sometimes one, sometimes the entire ruddy gallery - on, sometimes before you've even noticed it's happening."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Podcast #504 - SilverStone Redline, GIGABYTE Designare EX, and more!

Subject: General Tech | June 21, 2018 - 02:52 PM |
Tagged: x299, video, steam, Silverstone, Samsung, podcast, i7-8086k, gigabyte, freesync, blackberry, alienware

PC Perspective Podcast #504 - 06/21/18

Join us this week for discussion on SilverStone Redline, GIGABYTE’s Designare EX, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Ken Addison

Peanut Gallery: Alex Lustenberg

Program length: 1:11:04

Podcast topics of discussion:
  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Picks of the Week:
    1. 1:00:15 Ryan: Samsung Q6FN 55” TV
  4. Closing/outro
 
Source:

Samsung's C32HG70, FreeSync + HDR = FreeSync 2

Subject: Displays | June 20, 2018 - 03:54 PM |
Tagged: C32HG70, Samsung, freesync, freesync 2, hdr, quantum dots, 144hz

There is a lot to parse in Guru 3D's review of the Samsung C32HG70 a 32", 1440p, 144Hz curved VA panel as they delve into details about HDR and FreeSync as well as discussing the merits of 4k versus 2560x1440 or 3440x1440.  If you are already familiar with those topics you can jump into the meat of their review of this impressive panel.  The display offers great SDR performance but truly shines when you enable HDR and install the latest firmware updates, after which you can test your experience in Ultimate FreeSync which offers a dynamic range of 48-144Hz or in Standard which limits the range to 120-144Hz to prevent tearing which might occur in some setups.   There is a lot to go through in this review, so you might as well get started.

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"This Quantum Dot 2560x1440 monitor can do 144Hz combined with FreeSync and FreeSync2. That eliminates stutter and tearing while gaming in HDR. The Samsung C32HG70 is fitted with a VA panel offering proper image quality, connectivity, and features."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Source: Guru of 3D

Why we can't have nice things, part infinity ... Samsung escapes security support

Subject: General Tech | June 1, 2018 - 12:41 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, security, lawyers

It is unlikely you spend much time following Dutch court cases; thankfully The Register had an ear out though as this particular case is of interest to many.  The Dutch Consumers Association launched a case which would have made Samsung legally responsible for providing security updates to phones for up to four years after launch, two years after sale.  A judgment in favour of this would have meant an appeal, of course, but could eventually have meant Android updates for all as it would be a bizarre decision on Samsung's part to geographically limit security updates.  We should expect to see more cases, hopefully somewhere is a judge that does not consider a maximum of six years of security updates unacceptably onerous for Samsung to provide.

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"The case could have had far-reaching impacts, since there's little point in writing software for only one market. The Consumentenbond wanted the court to force the smartphone giant to provide security updates for four years after a product was launched, and/or two years after a product was sold."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: The Register