MSI has the prescription for quiet and powerful gaming with their new MECH RX 570 and 580

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 7, 2018 - 03:24 PM |
Tagged: amd, RX 570, RX 580, msi, MECH 2 OC, factory overclocked

MSI have released two new Polaris cards, the MECH 2 versions of the RX 570 and 580.  The cards come factory overclocked and the Guru of 3D were able to push the clocks higher using Afterburner, with noticeable improvements in performance.  For those more interested in quiet performance, the tests show these two to be some of the least noisy on the market, with the 570 hitting roughly ~34 dBA under full load and the 580 producing ~38dBA.  Check out the full review and remember that picking one of these up qualifies you for three free games!

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"Join us as we review the MSI Radeon RX 570 and 580 MECH 2 OC with 8GB graphics memory. This all-new two slot cooled mainstream graphics card series will allow you to play your games in both the Full HD 1080P as well as gaming in WQHD (2560x1440) domain. The new MECH 2 series come with revamped looks and cooling."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: Guru of 3D

Star Control: Origins, Strange Brigade and Assassin's Creed Odyssey FREE with Radeon RX Vega, RX 580 or RX 570

Subject: General Tech | August 7, 2018 - 02:39 PM |
Tagged: amd, gaming, rx vega, RX 580, RX 570, Assassin's Creed Odyssey, Strange Brigade, Star Control: Origins

AMD is offering three free games with the purchase of one of their new GPUs between today, August 7th, and November 3, 2018 with the game codes being redeemable until December 31, 2018.  None of the three games are yet released, Strange Brigade comes on August 28, Star Control: Origins on September 20 and Assassin's Creed Odyssey coming October 5. 

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As you do get them all for free the usual pre-order advice would not apply and you should definitely take advantage of this deal if you have any inclination of picking up an AMD GPU in the near future. 

This announcement comes at the same time as the arrival of the new MECH 2 RX 570 and 580 series from MSI, with a reasonable overclock out of the box and an updated cooler design.  Look out for more news on those two GPUs very soon.

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Today, AMD announced that gamers can get the PC versions of the highly anticipated Assassin's Creed Odyssey, Star Control: Origins and Strange Brigade for FREE when they buy an AMD Radeon RX Vega, RX 580 or RX 570 graphics card, once the titles are released.
 
Fast-forward to the year 2086 to join the galactic community and feel the thrill of ship-to-ship battle in Star Control: Origins. Stand against an ancient forgotten evil power in Strange Brigade. And forge your destiny and define your own path in war-torn Ancient Greece as you live an epic adventure in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey.
 
Strange Brigade will be available on August 28, Star Control: Origins will be available on September 20 and Assassin's Creed Odyssey will be available on October 5. The promotional period begins August 7 and expires November 3, 2018. Games can be redeemed until December 31, 2018.
 
The promotion is available worldwide with the following exceptions: China, Cuba, North Korea, Syria, Sudan and Iran

Source: AMD

ASRock Enters Graphics Card Market With Phantom Gaming Series of AMD GPUs

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 29, 2018 - 05:45 PM |
Tagged: RX 580, RX 570, RX 560, RX 550, Polaris, mining, asrock, amd

ASRock, a company known mostly for its motherboards that was formerly an Asus sub-brand but is now an independent company owned by Pegatron since 2010 is now getting into the graphics card market with a new Phantom Gaming series. At launch, the Phantom Gaming series is comprised of four AMD Polaris-based graphics cards including the Phantom Gaming RX 550 2G and RX 560 2G on the low end and the Phantom Gaming X RX 570 8G OC and RX 580 8G OC on the mid/high end range.

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ASRock is using black shrouds with white accents and silver and red logos. The lower end Phantom Gaming cards utilize a single dual ball bearing fan while the Phantom Gaming X cards use a dual fan configuration. ASRock is using copper baseplates paired with aluminum heatsinks and composite heatpipes. The Phantom Gaming RX 550 and RX 560 cards use only PCI-E slot power while the Phantom Gaming X RX 570 and RX 580 cards get power from both the slot and a single 8-pin PCI-E power connector.

Video outputs include one HDMI 2.0, one DisplayPort 1.4, and one DL-DVI-D on the Phantom Gaming parts and one HDMI 2.0, three DisplayPort 1.4, and one DL-DVI-D on the higher-end Phantom Gaming X graphics cards. All of the graphics card models feature both silent and overclocked modes in addition to their out-of-the-box default clocks depending on whether you value performance or noise. Users can select which mode they want or perform a custom overclock or fan curve using ASRock's Phantom Gaming Tweak utility.

On the performance front, out of the box ASRock is slightly overclocking the Phantom Gaming X OC cards (the RX 570 and RX 580 based ones) and slightly underclocking the lower end Phantom Gaming cards (including the memory which is downclocked to 6 GHz) compared to their AMD reference specifications.

  ASRock RX 580 OC RX 580 ASRock RX 570 OC RX 570 ASRock RX 560 RX 560 ASRock RX 550 RX 550
Cores 2304 2304 2048 2048 896 896 512 512
GPU Clock (MHz) 1380 1340 1280 1244 1149 1275 1100 1183
GPU Clock OC Mode (MHz) 1435 - 1331 - 1194 - 1144 -
Memory (GDDR5) 8GB 8GB 8GB 8GB 2GB 2GB/4GB 2GB 2GB/4GB
Memory Clock (GHz) 8GHz 8GHz 7GHz 7GHz 6GHz 7GHz 6GHz 7GHz
Memory Clock OC Mode (MHz) 8320 - 7280 - 6240 - 6240 -
Texture Units 144 144 128 128 64 64 32 32
ROPs 32 32 32 32 16 16 16 16

The table above shows the comparisons between the ASRock graphics cards and their AMD reference card counterparts. Note that the Phantom Gaming RX 560 2G is based on the cut-down 14 CU (compute unit) model rather than the launch 16 CU GPU. Also, even in OC Mode, ASRock does not bring the memory up to the 7 GT/s reference spec. On the positive side, turning on OC mode does give a decent factory overclock of the GPU over reference. Also nice to see is that on the higher end "OC Certified" Phantom Gaming X cards, ASRock overclocks both the GPU and memory speeds which is often not the case with factory overclocks.

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ASRock did not detail pricing with any of the launch announcement cards, but they should be coming soon with 4GB models of the RX 560 an RX 550 to follow later this year.

It is always nice to have more competition in this space and hopefully a new AIB partner for AMD helps alleviate shortages and demand for gaming cards if only by a bit. I am curious how well the cards will perform as while they look good on paper the company is new to graphics cards and the build quality really needs to be there. I am just hoping that the Phantom Gaming moniker is not an allusion to how hard these cards are going to be to find for gaming! (heh) If the rumored Ethereum ASICs do not kill the demand for AMD GPUs I do expect that ASRock will also be releasing mining specific cards as well at some point.

What are your thoughts on the news of ASRock moving into graphics cards?

Also read:

Source: Tech Report

Free Champions Pack for Quake Champions for free with AMD GPUs and CPUs

Subject: Graphics Cards | September 12, 2017 - 03:12 PM |
Tagged: Vega, ryzen 7, ryzen 5, ryzen, RX 580, RX 570, RX 560, ruby, repetition, quake champions, amd

Remember Ruby, that animated heroine ATI used in tech demos many years back?  She has returned recently and is now playable in Quake Champions for those who claim their free key.  In addition to appearing in the game, she is also the centre of attention in this announcement from AMD.

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If you purchase a new Ryzen 5 or 7 APU, or a RX 560, 570 or 580 you can now claim the Champions pack for Quake Champions for free.  The Champions pack will retail for $40 and add access to all current and future characters to your game, including a custom Ruby skin for Nyx.  If you purchased one of these products after August 22nd you are eligible to claim your key over at AMDRewards.  The contest will run until October 29th or until the keys run out.

 

Source: AMD
Author:
Manufacturer: AKiTiO

A long time coming

External video cards for laptops have long been a dream of many PC enthusiasts, and for good reason. It’s compelling to have a thin-and-light notebook with great battery life for things like meetings or class, with the ability to plug it into a dock at home and enjoy your favorite PC games.

Many times we have been promised that external GPUs for notebooks would be a viable option. Over the years there have been many commercial solutions involving both industry standard protocols like ExpressCard, as well as proprietary connections to allow you to externally connect PCIe devices. Inspiring hackers have also had their hand with this for many years, cobbling together interesting solutions using mPCIe and M.2 ports on their notebooks which were meant for other devices.

With the introduction of Intel’s Thunderbolt standard in 2011, there was a hope that we would finally achieve external graphics nirvana. A modern, Intel-backed protocol promising PCIe x4 speeds (PCIe 2.0 at that point) sounded like it would be ideal for connecting GPUs to notebooks, and in some ways it was. Once again the external graphics communities managed to get it to work through the use of enclosures meant to connect other non-GPU PCIe devices such as RAID and video capture cards to systems. However, software support was still a limiting factor. You were required to use an external monitor to display your video, and it still felt like you were just riding the line between usability and a total hack. It felt like we were never going to get true universal support for external GPUs on notebooks.

Then, seemingly of out of nowhere, Intel decided to promote native support for external GPUs as a priority when they introduced Thunderbolt 3. Fast forward, and we've already seen a much larger adoption of Thunderbolt 3 on PC notebooks than we ever did with the previous Thunderbolt implementations. Taking all of this into account, we figured it was time to finally dip our toes into the eGPU market. 

For our testing, we decided on the AKiTio Node for several reasons. First, at around $300, it's by far the lowest cost enclosure built to support GPUs. Additionally, it seems to be one of the most compatible devices currently on the market according to the very helpful comparison chart over at eGPU.io. The eGPU site is a wonderful resource for everything external GPU, over any interface possible, and I would highly recommend heading over there to do some reading if you are interested in trying out an eGPU for yourself.

The Node unit itself is a very utilitarian design. Essentially you get a folded sheet metal box with a Thunderbolt controller and 400W SFX power supply inside.

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In order to install a GPU into the Node, you must first unscrew the enclosure from the back and slide the outer shell off of the device.

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Once inside, we can see that there is ample room for any graphics card you might want to install in this enclosure. In fact, it seems a little too large for any of the GPUs we installed, including GTX 1080 Ti models. Here, you can see a more reasonable RX 570 installed.

Beyond opening up the enclosure to install a GPU, there is very little configuration required. My unit required a firmware update, but that was easily applied with the tools from the AKiTio site.

From here, I simply connected the Node to a ThinkPad X1, installed the NVIDIA drivers for our GTX 1080 Ti, and everything seemed to work — including using the 1080 Ti with the integrated notebook display and no external monitor!

Now that we've got the Node working, let's take a look at some performance numbers.

Continue reading our look at external graphics with the Thunderbolt 3 AKiTiO Node!

Computex 2017: Dell Updates XPS 27 AIO with RX 570 for VR

Subject: Systems | May 29, 2017 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: RX 570, kaby lake, Intel, dell, AIO, amd

Dell has refreshed their XPS 27 All-in-one with two new models. Both of these have their GPU upgraded to the AMD RX 570 and their CPU refreshed to the Core i7-7700, which Dell highlights for its VR readiness. The difference between the two is that the lower-end model, $1999.99 USD, has a non-touch screen and a 2TB hard drive backed by 32GB of M.2 SATA SSD cache; the higher-end model, $2649.99 USD, has a touch screen and a 512GB, PCIe SSD, which makes it a quarter of the storage, but much faster. Both are loaded with 16GB of RAM, but they can be configured up to 64GB.

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About two weeks ago, Kyle Wiggers of Digital Trends had some hands-on time with the refreshed all-in-one. He liked the vibrant, 4K panel that was apparently calibrated to AdobeRGB (although I can’t find any listing for how much it covers). The purpose of that color space is to overlap with both non-HDR video and with the gamut of commercial printers, which is useful for multiple types of publishers.

The Dell XPS 27 All-in-one is available now.

Source: Dell

Report: AMD to Launch Radeon RX 500 Series GPUs in April

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 1, 2017 - 05:04 PM |
Tagged: video card, RX 580, RX 570, RX 560, RX 550, rx 480, rumor, report, rebrand, radeon, graphics, gpu, amd

According to a report from VideoCardz.com we can expect AMD Radeon RX 500-series graphics cards next month, with an April 4th launch of the RX 580 and RX 570, and subsequent RX 560/550 launch on April 11. The bad news? According to the report "all cards, except RX 550, are most likely rebranded from Radeon RX 400 series".

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AMD Polaris 10 GPU (Image credit: Heise Online)

Until official confirmation on specs arrive, this is still speculative; however, if Vega is not ready for an April launch and AMD will indeed be refreshing their Radeon lineup, an R9 300-series speed bump/rebrand is not out of the realm of possibility. VideoCardz offers (unconfirmed, at this point) specs of the upcoming RX 500-series cards, with RX 400 numbers for comparison:

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Chart credit: VideoCardz.com

The first graph shows the increased GPU boost clock speed of ~1340 MHz for the rumored RX 580, with the existing RX 480 clocked at 1266 MHz. Both would be Polaris 10 GPUs with otherwise identical specs. The same largely holds for the rumored specs on the RX 570, though this GPU would presumably be shipping with faster memory clocks as well. On the RX 560 side, however, the Polaris 11 powered replacement for the RX 460 might be based on the 1024-core variant we have seen from the Chinese market.

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Chart credit: VideoCardz.com

No specifics on the RX 550 are yet known, which VideoCardz says "is most likely equipped with Polaris 12, a new low-end GPU". These rumors come via heise.de (German language), who state that those "hoping for Vega-card will be disappointed - the cards are intended to be rebrands with known GPUs". We will have to wait until next month to know for sure, but even if this is the case, expect faster clocks and better performance for the same money.

Source: VideoCardz